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ANTHRO 345W: Indigeneity

In recent decades, the emergence and proliferation of transnational Indigenous movements have foregrounded the socio-cultural survival and legal-political resurgence of Indigenous peoples in contemporary global society. Many Western academic disciplines and fields, including anthropology, understand Indigeneity as a historical positioning situated within particular regimes of governance under the sovereignty of the modern state in the liberal international order. Scholars debate the limits and possibilities of Indigenous resistance to decolonize entrenched power structures and dynamics of colonial rule that continue into the present. This graduate seminar introduces students to current interdisciplinary scholarship on Indigenous peoples, with a focus on anthropological research and engagement. Students will examine the evolution of anthropological theory and method for academic knowledge production on the situation of colonized peoples across contexts, scales, and processes. Students w more »
In recent decades, the emergence and proliferation of transnational Indigenous movements have foregrounded the socio-cultural survival and legal-political resurgence of Indigenous peoples in contemporary global society. Many Western academic disciplines and fields, including anthropology, understand Indigeneity as a historical positioning situated within particular regimes of governance under the sovereignty of the modern state in the liberal international order. Scholars debate the limits and possibilities of Indigenous resistance to decolonize entrenched power structures and dynamics of colonial rule that continue into the present. This graduate seminar introduces students to current interdisciplinary scholarship on Indigenous peoples, with a focus on anthropological research and engagement. Students will examine the evolution of anthropological theory and method for academic knowledge production on the situation of colonized peoples across contexts, scales, and processes. Students will also consider enduring and contentious questions on whether and how anthropologists should intervene in and shape native formations, particularly Indigenous communities with collective status and rights to territory, autonomy, and self-determination. The course will review case studies from different world regions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Callejas, H. (PI)
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