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51 - 60 of 112 results for: ANTHRO ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

ANTHRO 156: Japanese Anthropology (ANTHRO 256)

This is an advanced reading seminar in the field of Japanses Anthropology. nIt will explore the historical development of the field and the contemporary issues and topics taken up by scholars of Japanese anthropology. Prior knowledge of Japanese language, history, and, society is required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Inoue, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 166: Political Ecology of Tropical Land Use: Conservation, Natural Resource Extraction, and Agribusiness (ANTHRO 266)

Seminar. The state, private sector, development agencies, and NGOs in development and conservation of tropical land use. Focus is on the socioeconomic and political drivers of resource extraction and agricultural production. Case studies used to examine the local-to-global context from many disciplines. Are maps and analyses used for gain, visibility, accountability, or contested terrain? How are power dynamics, land use history, state-private sector collusion, and neoliberal policies valued? What are the local and extra-local responses?
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Curran, L. (PI)

ANTHRO 175: Human Skeletal Anatomy (ANTHRO 275, BIO 174, BIO 274, HUMBIO 180)

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual¿s age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Klein, R. (PI)

ANTHRO 176: Cultures, Minds, and Medicine (ANTHRO 276)

This workshop aims to bring together scholars from the social sciences, humanities, medicine and bio-science and technology to explore the ways that health and illness are made through complex social forces. We aim for informal, interactive sessions, full of debate and good will. Dates of meetings will be listed in the notes section in the time schedule.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 182D: Knowledge and Violence in the Middle East (ANTHRO 282D, CSRE 182C, HISTORY 282D, HISTORY 382D, SOC 182H)

In this colloquium, we will think about the various ways in which knowledge shapes violence and violence shapes knowledge in the modern Middle East. Recent works in various subfield of Middle Eastern studies, including history, anthropology, sociology and science and technology studies address this topic from different disciplinary perspectives. We will investigate how violence has been harnessed, theorized and narrated in influential works in these subfields. The course focuses on a set of key themes and questions that have been central to such writings: the nature of violence and the question of accountability and responsibility, shifting technologies of warfare, including technologies of representation, and the aftermath of violence. The questions that drive this colloquium, include, how do we define violence? What is its role in shaping the history and historiography of the modern Middle East? What is the relationship between war and the production of knowledge about war?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Zakar, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 188: Matter and Mattering: Transdisciplinary Thinking about Things (ANTHRO 288, APPPHYS 188, ARCHLGY 188, ARTSINST 198, ARTSINST 298)

Things sit at the nexus of cross-cutting heterogeneous processes; tracing the entanglements of any prominent thing or class of things demands a transdisciplinary approach that recruits expertise from the natural sciences, social sciences and humanities. For example, carbon is a key factor in global warming for reasons that are as much socio-historical as bio-physical, and we could not begin to sketch the full significance of carbon without considering such diverse frames of reference. Our growing appreciation in the social sciences and humanities of the agency, polyvalence and catalytic role of things has given rise to The New Materialist and Post-Humanist movements, which in turn raise questions about intra-action and observational perspective that are echoed in the modern physical and life sciences. In this class we will explore these theoretical convergences in considering themes such as `things-in-themselves¿, networks and open systems, assemblages and entanglements. We will also examine specific examples such as oil, metal (guns), dams, viruses, electricity, mushrooms; each thing will be explored both in terms of its social and ethical entanglements and in terms of its material properties and affordances. There will also be hands-on encounters with objects in labs and a couple of local field trips. The key question throughout will be `why and how does matter matter in society today?¿
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5

ANTHRO 193: Anthropology Capstone: Contemporary Debates in Anthropology

Do you know what an anthropological perspective is? Can you describe some of the key assumptions and questions within the discipline? nA major in Anthropology is composed of many specialized courses in different tracks, different emphases and seemingly a never-ending multiplication of perspectives and ethnographies. However, Anthropology is also an ongoing intellectual conversation with foundational questions, some of longstanding and some new. These foundational questions have stimulated different responses and answers and thus have also led to constant renewal of the discipline in the midst of profound disagreement. In this Anthropology Capstone course students across tracks and emphases will address some of the critical debates that have been central to the discipline as it has developed. We will feature three debate questions in the class. Preparation for each debate will be through class discussion of critical readings as well as extra-mural reading and preparation with one¿s debating partners.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

ANTHRO 199: Senior and Master's Paper Writing Workshop (ANTHRO 299)

Techniques of interpreting data, organizing bibliographic materials, writing, editing and revising. Preparation of papers for conferences and publications in anthropology. Seniors register for 199; master's students register for 299.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Can, S. (PI)

ANTHRO 201: Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 1)

This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and presents the discipline¿s distinctive perspective on society and culture. The power of this perspective is illustrated by exploring vividly-written ethnographic cases that show how anthropological approaches illuminate contemporary social and political issues in a range of different cultural sites.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Ferguson, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 206A: Incas and their Ancestors: Peruvian Archaeology (ANTHRO 106, ARCHLGY 102B)

The development of high civilizations in Andean S. America from hunter-gatherer origins to the powerful, expansive Inca empire. The contrasting ecologies of coast, sierra, and jungle areas of early Peruvian societies from 12,000 to 2,000 B.C.E. The domestication of indigenous plants which provided the economic foundation for monumental cities, ceramics, and textiles. Cultural evolution, and why and how major transformations occurred.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Muro, L. (PI)
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