2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

41 - 50 of 60 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 310G: Introduction to Graduate Studies

Required graduate seminar. The history of anthropological theory and key theoretical and methodological issues of the discipline. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

ANTHRO 322: From Biopolitics to Necropolitics and Beyond

Scholarship produced and informed by Michel Foucault. Focus is on the final period of Foucault¿s life; how his discussions of biopolitics, subjectification, governmentality, and death have served as touchstones for recent empirical research. Key interventions initially made under these rubrics; how anthropologists and others have applied, challenged, and extended them. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Kohrman, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 328: Making

The politics of visuality, social imagination, and the ethics of visual production and consumption in the current moment. Sources include anthropology, art history, and philosophy. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Malkki, L. (PI)

ANTHRO 345A: Race and Power: The Making of Human Difference in History, Biology and Capital

This course examines how race is made. We will pay close attention to how people engage with material, economic, scientific, and cultural forces to articulate human group difference as a given, and even natural. In this seminar, we will look at the reality of race as a literally constructed phenomenon, where historical, colonial, bodily, market, penal, and humanitarian constituent elements both circulate and sediment racial understandings. To focus our readings and discussions we will divide this vast terrain into three units: race and the colonial encounter, race and biopower, and race in systems of capital accumulation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

ANTHRO 351: The Ordinary: The History of a Concept

The ordinary has today acquired something like a cultic status in contemporary culture. `Ordinary¿ citizens are the touchstone and essence of political democracy; the holy grail of effective marketing, the byword for earthy ethical judgment. In social science, the ordinary has blended in with the `normal¿ and the statistical mean. In Anthropology, ordinary life has all but replaced `cultural practice¿ as the epistemic gold standard of evidence. But this was not always so, and the ordinary has many, varied and contradictory meanings across the world.nThis course will (a) trace the historical emergence of the ordinary as a central ideological and metaphysical concept in modern thought and practice; (b) trace how the ordinary and the everyday have acquired unprecedented authority in anthropology; (3) trace the varies meanings and connotations of `the ordinary¿ in different socio-historical contexts from Asia, Africa and Euro-America.nThe literature will consist of ethnographies, and works of philosophical and historical scholarship.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

ANTHRO 363A: Anthropology of Environmental Conservation

Graduate seminar focused on key works by anthropologists on environmental conservation. We will discuss both classics (ie, works by Ostrom, Lansing, Bray) as well recent debates regarding communities, neoliberalism and conservation. Students will present on topics of particular interest or relevance to their research.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Durham, W. (PI)

ANTHRO 364: EcoGroup: Current Topics in Ecological, Evolutionary, and Environmental Anthropology

Seminar; restricted to graduate students. Topics vary with instructor. How to ask appropriate questions, how to derive research hypotheses from theory, how to design methodologies for testing hypotheses, and how to present results by reading and critiquing key contemporary papers in the field. Ph.D. students enrolling in this course to fulfill the department review course requirement must enroll in 5 units. Graduate students enrolling in this course to participate in a topical forum may enroll in 2 units. Course may be repeated for 2 units. Prerequisites: by consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Curran, L. (PI)

ANTHRO 367B: The Intellectual and Political Career of Stuart Hall and British Cultural Studies from 1960 to 2014

The seminar traces the trajectory of Stuart Hall and British Cultural Studies, beginning with the first New Left in 1960; then the Birmingham Centre period, Thatcherism and Gramscian analysis; race, gender, and identity politics; global and diasporic approaches; New Times, neo-liberalism, and the problem of historicizing the present conjuncture. Case studies from other parts of the world will put cultural studies tools to the test.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Clifford, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 400: Dissertation Writers Seminar

Required of fifth-year Ph.D. students returning from dissertation field research and in the process of writing dissertations and preparing for professional employment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Jain, S. (PI)

ANTHRO 401A: Qualifying Examination: Topic

Required of second- and third-year Ph.D. students writing the qualifying paper or the qualifying written examination. May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints