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21 - 30 of 60 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 144B: The Buddhist Body in East Asia: Charisma, Gender, and the Gift of the Body (ANTHRO 244B)

This course introduces Buddhist practices and texts of embodiment as a subject of the anthropology of the body. We draw on research in social/cultural anthropology, history, and religious studies, and examine a selection of approaches to the Buddhist body: the body of power in Buddhist charisma, the gender of the bodhisattva¿s and monastic body, the techniques of the body in meditation and martial arts, healing and cultivation, and the gift of the body in bioethics and medical education. We draw on examples in different traditions of Buddhism in a range of societies with a special focus on Chinese Buddhism.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Huang, C. (PI)

ANTHRO 145: Race and Power (ANTHRO 245, CSRE 145F)

This course examines how race is made. We will pay close attention to how people engage with material, economic, scientific, and cultural forces to articulate human group difference as a given, and even natural. In this seminar, we will look at the construction of race as a literally made phenomenon, where historical, colonial, bodily, market, and humanitarian constituent elements both circulate and sediment racial understandings. To focus our readings and discussions we will divide this vast terrain into three units: race and the colonial encounter, race and biopower, and race and capital.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

ANTHRO 146B: Global Heritage, World Heritage: History and Intersections in Contemporary Society (ARCHLGY 146B)

This Course will provide an overview of global heritage by focusing on the UNESCO World Heritage Program, which is based on an international treaty, the 1972 Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage. The first part of the course will provide an historical overview on the development of the international preservation movements, the second part of the course will concentrate on how anthropology can contribute to the study of intergovernmental organizations and cultural bureaucracies, the third part and will discuss specific issues related to heritage by providing case studies from the World Heritage. This course will provide theoretical and empirical interpretations of contemporary issues in heritage and will give students a critical understanding of the complexities related to various uses of past in the present.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Liuzza, C. (PI)

ANTHRO 173: Human Dimensions of Global Environmental Change: Resilence, Vulnerability, and Environmental Justice (HUMBIO 111)

The complexity of social and political issues surrounding global environmental change. Emphasis is on synergies precipitated by human-induced climatic change. Case studies and scenarios to explore the vulnerability and resilience in households, communities, regions, and nationmstates most affected by extreme weather conditions. Their concerns, livelihood changes, and diverse responses of rural smallholders, indigenous communities, the state, and local and regional migrants. Central theme is environmental justice.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

ANTHRO 176: Cultures, Minds, and Medicine (ANTHRO 276)

This workshop aims to bring together scholars from the social sciences, humanities, medicine and bio-science and technology to explore the ways that health and illness are made through complex social forces. We aim for informal, interactive sessions, full of debate and good will. Dates of meetings will be listed in the notes section in the time schedule.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Luhrmann, T. (PI)

ANTHRO 178: Evolution and Conservation in Galapagos (ANTHRO 278)

The contribution of research in the Galapagos Islands to our current understanding of evolution and conservation. Writings from Darwin to Dawkins, as they reveal patterns and processes of evolution including selection, adaptation, speciation, and coevolution. Current conservation strategies in the archipelago, and urgent measures needed today before unique species and adaptations are lost.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

ANTHRO 186: Culture and Madness (ANTHRO 286)

'Madness' lends insight into the construction of the normal and abnormal; the boundaries of reason and unreason; the epistemological relation of mind and body, and the management of difference and disease. Taking an interdisciplinary perspective, this course explores the fundamental questions madness poses to subjectivity, culture and modernity.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 193: Anthropology Capstone: Contemporary Debates in Anthropology

Do you know what an anthropological perspective is? Can you describe some of the key assumptions and questions within the discipline? nA major in Anthropology is composed of many specialized courses in different tracks, different emphases and seemingly a never-ending multiplication of perspectives and ethnographies. However, Anthropology is also an ongoing intellectual conversation with foundational questions, some of longstanding and some new. These foundational questions have stimulated different responses and answers and thus have also led to constant renewal of the discipline in the midst of profound disagreement. In this Anthropology Capstone course students across tracks and emphases will address some of the critical debates that have been central to the discipline as it has developed. We will feature three debate questions in the class. Preparation for each debate will be through class discussion of critical readings as well as extra-mural reading and preparation with one¿s debating partners.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

ANTHRO 206A: Incas and their Ancestors: Peruvian Archaeology (ANTHRO 106, ARCHLGY 102B)

The development of high civilizations in Andean S. America from hunter-gatherer origins to the powerful, expansive Inca empire. The contrasting ecologies of coast, sierra, and jungle areas of early Peruvian societies from 12,000 to 2,000 B.C.E. The domestication of indigenous plants which provided the economic foundation for monumental cities, ceramics, and textiles. Cultural evolution, and why and how major transformations occurred.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Bautista, S. (PI)

ANTHRO 209A: Archaeology of the Modern World (ANTHRO 109A, ARCHLGY 109A)

Historical archaeology, also called the archaeology of the modern world, investigates the material culture and spatial history of the past five centures. As a discipline, historical archaeology has been characterized by (1) a methodological conjunction between history and archaeology; (2) a topical focus on the ¿three Cs¿: colonization, captivity, and capitalism ¿ forces which arguably are constitutive of the modern world; and (3) an epistemological priority to recovering the perspectives of ¿people without history.¿ Each of these three trends is widely debated yet they continue to profoundly shape the field. This seminar provides an in-depth examination of the emergence and development of this historical archaeology, with a focus on current issues in theory and method. For undergraduates, the prerequisite is Anthro 3 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Voss, B. (PI)
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