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11 - 20 of 60 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 106: Incas and their Ancestors: Peruvian Archaeology (ANTHRO 206A, ARCHLGY 102B)

The development of high civilizations in Andean S. America from hunter-gatherer origins to the powerful, expansive Inca empire. The contrasting ecologies of coast, sierra, and jungle areas of early Peruvian societies from 12,000 to 2,000 B.C.E. The domestication of indigenous plants which provided the economic foundation for monumental cities, ceramics, and textiles. Cultural evolution, and why and how major transformations occurred.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Bautista, S. (PI)

ANTHRO 108A: The Formation of Political State in the Peruvian Andes

This course provides a panorama of the prehistory and history of the political state developed in Peruvian Andes. The Peruvian Andes is a rich cultural area in South America the first generations of Andean state societies developed. Beginning in Formative times with Chavin Culture we have an important development of different forms of state from theocratic to military, and most importantly, the Inca Empire. This richness and diversity of state societies was a consequence of an interesting relationship between societies of different levels of development, economies, and of course, the related diverse ecologies of the region. In 1532, Spanish conquerors came to the Inca Empire and introduced their new vision of politics and economics, and created corresponding new institutions in the Andes. The ensuing colonial age had an interesting development and brought new tensions to this New World. Native ways of work and thought survive in colonial times, creating a distinctive political and ideological scenario including deep ethnic and economic differences. These political tensions established the foundations for revolutionary movements based in indigenous belief as for example ¿Taky Onkoy¿ (dancing sickness) or ¿Neo-Incanism¿. Finally, with independence from Spain, a new republic is established from Lima but many problems in the native structures conditioned the development of new liberal politics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

ANTHRO 109A: Archaeology of the Modern World (ANTHRO 209A, ARCHLGY 109A)

Historical archaeology, also called the archaeology of the modern world, investigates the material culture and spatial history of the past five centures. As a discipline, historical archaeology has been characterized by (1) a methodological conjunction between history and archaeology; (2) a topical focus on the ¿three Cs¿: colonization, captivity, and capitalism ¿ forces which arguably are constitutive of the modern world; and (3) an epistemological priority to recovering the perspectives of ¿people without history.¿ Each of these three trends is widely debated yet they continue to profoundly shape the field. This seminar provides an in-depth examination of the emergence and development of this historical archaeology, with a focus on current issues in theory and method. For undergraduates, the prerequisite is Anthro 3 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Voss, B. (PI)

ANTHRO 125: Language and the Environment (ANTHRO 225)

Lecture course on vocabulary and grammar as keys to peoples¿ understanding and use of the environment. Ethnobotany, ethnobiology, and ethnosemantics in the analysis of the language of place, plants and animals, the earth, the body, and disease. Terminological gaps and gluts and what they imply. Language as a strategic resource in environmental management. Language contact and conflict in the modern global environment, with particular attention to the vocabularies of capitalism and property. Language extinction and its environmental implications. Anthropology concentration: CS, EE. No prerequisites.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Fox, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 126: Urban Culture in Global Perspective (URBANST 114)

Core course for Urban Studies majors. We will study urban space both historically and cross-culturally. Urban Studies, by definition, is an interdisciplinary field, where the methodological approaches draw upon a diverse set of analytic tools. Disciplines that occupy a prominent place in this class are geography, cultural anthropology, sociology, history, media studies, and literature. In this context, we will discuss the importance of cities around the world to the economic, cultural, and political well-being of modern societies and examine how forces such as industrialization, decentralization, and globalization affect the structure and function of cities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 130D: Spatial Approaches to Social Science (ANTHRO 230D, POLISCI 241S, URBANST 124)

This multidisciplinary course combines different approaches to how GIS and spatial tools can be applied in social science research. We take a collaborative, project oriented approach to bring together technical expertise and substantive applications from several social science disciplines. The course aims to integrate tools, methods, and current debates in social science research and will enable students to engage in critical spatial research and a multidisciplinary dialogue around geographic space.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 133B: Covering Islam: On What We Learn to See, Think and Hear about Islam & Muslims (AFRICAST 133B, CSRE 133B)

In this course, students will think critically about how knowledge about Islam, Muslims, and Muslim Societies is produced and circulated. As a class, we will consider why and how certain kinds of ideas about Islam and Muslims become representative (i.e., authoritative discourse) while others ideas do not. This is an interdisciplinary class; course material will draw on readings from anthropology, literary criticism, history, sociology and media and cultural studies. We will also be engaging with other kinds of material, including news articles, editorials, documentaries, and films.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Ghani, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 134B: Conflict and Change in the Middle East

Following the Arab Spring, the hope for political and social change has been widely raised and celebrated in the Middle East. This hope, however, has been shattered alongside the recent cycles of violence and conflict in different parts of the region, from Syria and Iraq to Egypt. This course examines political violence, change, and boundary making in the modern Middle East. By taking a historical and anthropological look at the political conflict and change, this course will explore how particular political, economic, and social narratives, encounters, and contradictions have accompanied the conflict and change in the region. The course will focus on the cases from Turkey, Iraq, Syria, Iran, Egypt, Morocco, and Israel/Palestine.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Bozcali, F. (PI)

ANTHRO 138: Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise (ANTHRO 238, CSRE 138)

This course will explore historical as well as current market transformations of medical ethics in different global contexts. We will examine various aspects of the research enterprise, its knowledge-generating and life-saving goals, as well as the societal, cultural, and political influences that make medical research a site of brokering in need of oversight and emergent ethics.nThis seminar will provide students with tools to explore and critically assess the various technical, social, and ethical positions of researchers, as well as the role of the state, the media, and certain publics in shaping scientific research agendas. We will also examine how structural violence, poverty, global standing, and issues of citizenship also influence issues of consent and just science and medicine.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-ER

ANTHRO 140: Ethnography of Africa

This course is an exploration of some central themes and issues in contemporary African society through close readings of a selection of recent ethnographies. It aims to understand Africa as a place where many of the most challenging issues of a modern, globalized world are being thought about in exciting and creative ways, both by ethnographers and by the people about whom they write. Among the key issues that the course seeks to address are: the history and politics of colonial domination; the ways that medicine and government intersect; the increasing use of humanitarian frames of reference in understanding African realities; the changing meanings of HIV/AIDS, sex, and love; and the role of mass media in enabling cultural and imaginative production to take form.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
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