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171 - 180 of 427 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 161A: Human Ecology: Adaptations to Climate and Climate Change (ANTHRO 261A)

Humans face essentially the same adaptive challenges as all organisms but are unique for having successfully adapted to virtually every environment on Earth. The resulting diversity of phenotypes and cultures¿past and present¿is key to understanding how interactions with environments shape the economic, social, and cultural lives of hunter-gatherers, pastoralists and agriculturalists. This course surveys the range of human adaptations from an ecological and evolutionary perspective to understand human adaptive capacity and vulnerability to climate change.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 162: Indigenous Peoples and Environmental Problems (ANTHRO 262)

The social and cultural consequences of contemporary environmental problems. The impact of market economies, development efforts, and conservation projects on indigenous peoples, emphasizing Latin America. The role of indigenous grass roots organizations in combating environmental destruction and degradation of homeland areas.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Durham, W. (PI)

ANTHRO 163: Conservation and Evolutionary Ecology (ANTHRO 263)

Environmental degradation resulting from human behavior, and what can be done about it. Patterns of interaction between people and environments, and why they vary over time and space. Topics include adaptation and behavior, resource acquisition and utilization, conflicts of interest, collective action problems, conspicuous consumption, waste, land management, and public policy.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 163A: Endangered Languages and Language Revitalization (ANTHRO 263A, LINGUIST 163A, LINGUIST 263, NATIVEAM 163)

Languages around the world are dying at such a rapid rate that the next century could see half of the world's 6800 languages and cultures become extinct unless action is taken now. This course looks at how and why languages die, and what is lost from a culture when that occurs. We will investigate how this trend can be reversed by methods of language documentation and description, the use of innovative technologies, multimodal fieldwork, writing dictionaries and grammars for different audiences, language planning, and data creation, annotation, preservation, and dissemination. We will focus on a number of current programs around the world to revitalize languages. Finally, the course will examine ethical modes of fieldwork within endangered language communities, and the possibilities of successful collaborations and capacity building, focusing especially on Northern California Indian peoples and their languages.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 164: Natural Resource Extraction: Use and Development: Assessing Policies, Practices and Outcomes (ANTHRO 264)

This interdisciplinary course explores natural resource extraction from multiple conceptual perspectives. Logging and non-timber resource harvesting practices are examined through ecological dynamics of species and community life histories, natural and anthropogenic disturbance regimes and resilience and recovery to diverse perturbations through alternative stable states. Using a political ecology lens, we then examine historical and current policies and practices aimed to manage terrestrial resource use and extraction: maximum sustained yield, community-based forest management, certification systems, payment for ecosystem services and Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD). Through problem sets and lab/field exercises, we employ quantitative ecological measurements and experiments coupled with quantitative and qualitative methods and analyses used to assess socio-economic drivers and ecological impacts. Diverse benefits/costs imparted throughout the supply chain - from extraction to consumer ¿ are explored across temporal and spatial scales with local to global agents. No Prerequisites: course or foundation in Ecology, Community Ecology, and/or Ecosystem Ecology strongly suggested.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 164A: Anthropology of Ecotourism

Ecotourism has been touted as a win-win scenario for both biodiversity conservation and the well-being of local residents. In practice, these lofty ideals of ecotourism have proven difficult to implement. The rapid development of ecotourism over the last two decades. Focus is on the scholarly literature relating to ecotourism from both supporting and critical perspectives.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 164B: Anthropology of Tourism

As ¿the largest scale movement of goods, services, and people that humanity has ever seen,¿ tourism is an immense phenomenon and is currently the world¿s most immense industry, reaching some of the most remote people and places on the planet. Yet scholars have only begun to focus on the topic in recent decades. This seminar-style course will focus on the key anthropological and social science literature relating to tourism from both supporting and critical perspectives; however, tourism is an inherently multi-disciplinary subject and students from all disciplines are encouraged to enroll. After providing an initial overview of this phenomenon and field of study, later sections of the course will focus on emerging sub-types of tourism including sustainable tourism, ecotourism, agritourism, and geotourism to name just a few.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 165: Parks and Peoples: The Benefits and Costs of Protected Area Conservation

Seminar. Emphasis is on the social impact of parks and reserves. Integrated conservation and development projects (ICDPs) based on protected areas; alternative ways to derive local social benefits from them. Cases include Yellowstone, Manu, Galápagos, Ngorongoro, and Guanacaste.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 165A: People and Parks: Management of Protected Areas

As resources become scarcer, parks increasingly serve as ideological battlegrounds for contested core human values and often put livelihoods at stake. Their historical development and the complex array of present-day issues associated with the formal protection of biodiversity. The ideas behind parks and the evolution of these ideas.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 166: Political Ecology of Tropical Land Use: Conservation, Natural Resource Extraction, and Agribusiness (ANTHRO 266)

Seminar. The state, private sector, development agencies, and NGOs in development and conservation of tropical land use. Focus is on the socioeconomic and political drivers of resource extraction and agricultural production. Case studies used to examine the local-to-global context from many disciplines. Are maps and analyses used for gain, visibility, accountability, or contested terrain? How are power dynamics, land use history, state-private sector collusion, and neoliberal policies valued? What are the local and extra-local responses?
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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