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11 - 20 of 47 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 137D: Political Exhumations. Killing Sites Research in Comparative Perspective (ARCHLGY 137, ARCHLGY 237, REES 237)

The course discusses the politics and practices of exhumation of individual and mass graves. The problem of exhumations will be considered as a distinct socio-political phenomenon characteristic of contemporary times and related to transitional justice. The course will offer analysis of case studies of political exhumations of victims of the Dirty War in Argentina, ethnic cleansing in former Yugoslavia, the Holocaust, communist violence in Poland, the Rwandan genocide, and the Spanish Civil War. The course will make use of new interpretations of genocide studies, research of mass graves, such as environmental and forensic approaches.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Domanska, E. (PI)

ANTHRO 138: Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise (ANTHRO 238, CSRE 138)

This course will explore historical as well as current market transformations of medical ethics in different global contexts. We will examine various aspects of the research enterprise, its knowledge-generating and life-saving goals, as well as the societal, cultural, and political influences that make medical research a site of brokering in need of oversight and emergent ethics.nThis seminar will provide students with tools to explore and critically assess the various technical, social, and ethical positions of researchers, as well as the role of the state, the media, and certain publics in shaping scientific research agendas. We will also examine how structural violence, poverty, global standing, and issues of citizenship also influence issues of consent and just science and medicine.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 157: Japanese Popular Culture (ANTHRO 257)

This seminar focuses on the intersection between politics and popular culture in contemporary Japan. It will survey a range of social and political implications of practices of popular culture. Topics include J-pop, manga, anime, and other popular visual cultures, as well as social media. Students will be introduced to theories of popular culture in general, and a variety of contemporary anthropological studies on Japanese popular culture in particular. Prior knowledge of cultural anthropology is required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Inoue, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 158: The Anthropology of Social Class (ANTHRO 258)

Course introduces social theory concepts and paradigms for the understanding of class. It then extends and revises those concepts and paradigms by considering anthropological approaches in different cultural and historical settings that consider the entanglements of class with other social hierarchies, especially race, caste, and ideas of "civilization" and "development".
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ferguson, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 166A: Semiotics for Ethnography (ANTHRO 266A)

This workshop-style seminar introduces students to core theories and concepts in linguistic and semiotic anthropology. Examining current theoretical innovations in this field of study, the course explores the multivalent relationships between language and political authority, discourse and technology, and speech and material infrastructures. Emphasis is placed on how semiotic approaches provide tools for ethnographic analysis, and students will learn how to use semiotic concepts for their own research projects.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 182D: Knowledge and Violence in the Middle East (ANTHRO 282D, CSRE 182C, HISTORY 282D, HISTORY 382D, SOC 182H)

In this colloquium, we will think about the various ways in which knowledge shapes violence and violence shapes knowledge in the modern Middle East. Recent works in various subfield of Middle Eastern studies, including history, anthropology, sociology and science and technology studies address this topic from different disciplinary perspectives. We will investigate how violence has been harnessed, theorized and narrated in influential works in these subfields. The course focuses on a set of key themes and questions that have been central to such writings: the nature of violence and the question of accountability and responsibility, shifting technologies of warfare, including technologies of representation, and the aftermath of violence. The questions that drive this colloquium, include, how do we define violence? What is its role in shaping the history and historiography of the modern Middle East? What is the relationship between war and the production of knowledge about war?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Zakar, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 186: Culture and Madness: Anthropological and Psychiatric Approaches to Mental Illness (ANTHRO 286, HUMBIO 146, PSYC 286)

Unusual mental phenomena have existed throughout history and across cultures. Taught by an anthropologist and psychiatrist, this course explores how different societies construct the notions of "madness": What are the boundaries between "normal" and "abnormal", reason and unreason, mind and body, diversity and disease? nnOptional: The course will be taught in conjunction with an optional two-unit discussion section or engaged learning component.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 199: Senior and Master's Paper Writing Workshop (ANTHRO 299)

Techniques of interpreting data, organizing bibliographic materials, writing, editing and revising. Preparation of papers for conferences and publications in anthropology. Seniors register for 199; master's students register for 299.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Can, S. (PI)

ANTHRO 238: Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise (ANTHRO 138, CSRE 138)

This course will explore historical as well as current market transformations of medical ethics in different global contexts. We will examine various aspects of the research enterprise, its knowledge-generating and life-saving goals, as well as the societal, cultural, and political influences that make medical research a site of brokering in need of oversight and emergent ethics.nThis seminar will provide students with tools to explore and critically assess the various technical, social, and ethical positions of researchers, as well as the role of the state, the media, and certain publics in shaping scientific research agendas. We will also examine how structural violence, poverty, global standing, and issues of citizenship also influence issues of consent and just science and medicine.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 257: Japanese Popular Culture (ANTHRO 157)

This seminar focuses on the intersection between politics and popular culture in contemporary Japan. It will survey a range of social and political implications of practices of popular culture. Topics include J-pop, manga, anime, and other popular visual cultures, as well as social media. Students will be introduced to theories of popular culture in general, and a variety of contemporary anthropological studies on Japanese popular culture in particular. Prior knowledge of cultural anthropology is required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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