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21 - 30 of 59 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 199: Senior and Master's Paper Writing Workshop (ANTHRO 299)

Techniques of interpreting data, organizing bibliographic materials, writing, editing and revising. Preparation of papers for conferences and publications in anthropology. Seniors register for 199; master's students register for 299.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Bozcali, F. (PI)

ANTHRO 216B: Anthropology of the Environment (ANTHRO 116B)

This seminar interrogates the history of anthropology's approach to the environment, beginning with early functionalist, structuralist, and Marxist accounts of human-environment relationships. It builds towards more recent developments in the field, focusing on nonhuman and relational ontologies as well as current projects on the intersections of nature, capital, politics, and landscape histories. At the end of this class, students will be familiar with the intellectual histories of environmental anthropology and contemporary debates and tensions around questions of ethics, agency, environment, and historical causality.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Bauer, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 217B: Monuments and Landscapes: An Archaeological Perspective (ANTHRO 117B, ARCHLGY 117B)

The landscape is a result of the action and interaction of human and natural factors. Communities have altered their landscapes for a variety of reasons, including the subsistence practices; as a consequence of economic growth; to express a social ideology, and as a consequence of political and religious drivers. Accordingly, landscapes enable physical and provide psychological sustenance to people, and the human need to relate to our surroundings is part of the way in which identities are created and disputed. Within the humanities, landscape is being conceptualized as a process, a practice and as performance, and monuments within a given landscape have an equally important role, not to mention history. They are often the most durable and well-known evidence of the ancient civilizations, and should be observed jointly with the landscape. How did the landscape predefine the monument and how did the monument complement, emphasize or devalue the landscape? What philosophy channeled the construction of the monuments within the landscapes? Whether ephemeral or permanent, the human agency left traces in the landscape; thus, both monuments and landscapes are the key indicators for understanding the ideology of a particular culture. Archaeology, through its interdisciplinary nature, provides a unique perspective, as well as tools, for examining the formation processes of all man-made elements, within both natural and cultural landscapes. nnThe course will address the multifaceted issues of the ways that people have consciously and unconsciously shaped the land around them through time. It will look into diverse, geographically and periodically influenced concepts of a monument and landscape. The course will be divided into two parts, with the first one covering the theory and methodological approaches and the second part the conceptual characteristics, modifications and changeability in various archaeological and historical periods and cultural frameworks.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Caval, S. (PI)

ANTHRO 256: Japanese Anthropology (ANTHRO 156)

This is an advanced reading seminar in the field of Japanses Anthropology. nIt will explore the historical development of the field and the contemporary issues and topics taken up by scholars of Japanese anthropology. Prior knowledge of Japanese language, history, and, society is required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Inoue, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 262: Indigenous Peoples and Environmental Problems (ANTHRO 162)

The social and cultural consequences of contemporary environmental problems. The impact of market economies, development efforts, and conservation projects on indigenous peoples, emphasizing Latin America. The role of indigenous grass roots organizations in combating environmental destruction and degradation of homeland areas.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Durham, W. (PI)

ANTHRO 271: The Biology and Evolution of Language (ANTHRO 171, HUMBIO 145L)

Lecture course surveying the biology, linguistic functions, and evolution of the organs of speech and speech centers in the brain, language in animals and humans, the evolution of language itself, and the roles of innateness vs. culture in language. Suitable both for general education and as preparation for further studies in anthropology, biology, linguistics, medicine, psychology, and speech & language therapy. Anthropology concentration: CS, EE. No prerequisites.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Fox, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 272B: Anthropology of Gender/Sexuality: Eco-Feminist Persepctives (ANTHRO 172B)

This course takes an eco-feminist approach to anthropology, investigating the different meanings of ¿eco¿ in eco-nomy and eco-logy. The term, ¿eco¿, from the Greek, ¿oikos,¿ means ¿household,¿ ¿house,¿ or ¿family¿, laying the foundation for examining women¿s roles in changing forms of kinship, beyond and within the concept of the human.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

ANTHRO 276: Cultures, Minds, and Medicine (ANTHRO 176)

This workshop aims to bring together scholars from the social sciences, humanities, medicine and bio-science and technology to explore the ways that health and illness are made through complex social forces. We aim for informal, interactive sessions, full of debate and good will. Dates of meetings will be listed in the notes section in the time schedule.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Luhrmann, T. (PI)

ANTHRO 298C: Digital Methods in Anthropology (ANTHRO 98C)

The course provides an introduction to a broad range of digital tools and techniques for anthropological research. It is geared towards those interested in exploring such methodologies for their research and wanting to add hands-on experience with state-of-the-art digital tools to their skill set. Students will learn to work with some of the most common tools used to collect and manage digital data, and to perform various types of analysis and visualization.nUndergraduate students register for 5 Units, Graduate students can register for 5 or 3 units.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Engel, C. (PI)

ANTHRO 299: Senior and Master's Paper Writing Workshop (ANTHRO 199)

Techniques of interpreting data, organizing bibliographic materials, writing, editing and revising. Preparation of papers for conferences and publications in anthropology. Seniors register for 199; master's students register for 299.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Bozcali, F. (PI)
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