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251 - 260 of 472 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 206A: Incas and their Ancestors: Peruvian Archaeology (ANTHRO 106, ARCHLGY 102B)

The development of high civilizations in Andean S. America from hunter-gatherer origins to the powerful, expansive Inca empire. The contrasting ecologies of coast, sierra, and jungle areas of early Peruvian societies from 12,000 to 2,000 B.C.E. The domestication of indigenous plants which provided the economic foundation for monumental cities, ceramics, and textiles. Cultural evolution, and why and how major transformations occurred.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Rick, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 209: Archaeology: World Cultural Heritage (ANTHRO 109)

Focus is on issues dealing with rights to land and the past on a global scale including conflicts and ethnic purges in the Middle East, the Balkans, Afghanistan, India, Australia, and the Americas. How should world cultural heritage be managed? Who defines what past and which sites and monuments should be saved and protected? Are existing international agreements adequate? How can tourism be balanced against indigenous rights and the protection of the past?
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 209A: Archaeology of the Modern World (ANTHRO 109A, ARCHLGY 109A)

Historical archaeology, also called the archaeology of the modern world, investigates the material culture and spatial history of the past five centures. As a discipline, historical archaeology has been characterized by (1) a methodological conjunction between history and archaeology; (2) a topical focus on the ¿three Cs¿: colonization, captivity, and capitalism ¿ forces which arguably are constitutive of the modern world; and (3) an epistemological priority to recovering the perspectives of ¿people without history.¿ Each of these three trends is widely debated yet they continue to profoundly shape the field. This seminar provides an in-depth examination of the emergence and development of this historical archaeology, with a focus on current issues in theory and method. For undergraduates, the prerequisite is Anthro 3 or consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 210: Environmental Archaeology (ANTHRO 110, ARCHLGY 110)

This course investigates the field of environmental archaeology. Its goals are twofold: 1) to critically consider the intellectual histories of environmental archaeology, and, 2) to survey the various techniques and methods by which archaeologists assess historical environmental conditions through material proxies. The course will include lab activities.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 210A: Neandertals and Modern Humans: Origin, Evolution, Interactions (ANTHRO 110A)

The expansion out of Africa of our species represents the last spectacular step in the course of Human Evolution. It resulted in the colonization of the whole planet and the replacement of archaic forms of humans in Eurasia. One way to investigate why Homo sapiens has been such a successful species is to compare its evolution with that of its closest relative, the Neandertals. Exploring the bio-cultural processes at work in the two lineages leads to examine some of the main issues in Paleoanthropology and the most recent methodological advances in the field.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2011 | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 210B: Examining Ethnographies (ANTHRO 110B)

Eight or nine important ethnographies, including their construction, their impact, and their faults and virtues.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2019 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 211A: Archaeology of the Andes of Argentina (ANTHRO 111A)

The aim of this course is to provide a panorama of the archaeology of the andean region of Argentina, along some main topics of past and current researches. North andean Argentina has been considered for a long time as subordinated to the major developments in the central Andes and Puna, as if it were in a marginal position that mirrored their history. More than a hundred years of research in the area have produced different insights, which put that affirmation in relative terms. nThe course will give an overview of major historical contributions and contemporary trends in the archaeological thinking in relation to themes such as time, the space, people, things and nature. An overview of the conceptions and construction of time. Space seen as cultural area; natural environment and built landscape; archaeological areas as national territory. Historical conceptions of people; bodies; social inequality; the past and present others in the archaeological research. Artefacts, classifications and typologies; material archaeological contexts as cultural units; from artefacts to things; past ontologies. Nature and environment; domestication; ecological approaches; agropastoralism; nature/culture. nIt is expected that by the end of the course students will gain a panorama of the major problems of the archaeology of andean Argentina with historically and theoretically informed perspectives.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2013 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 212: Public Archaeology: Market Street Chinatown Archaeology Project (ANTHRO 112, ASNAMST 112)

This internship-style course centers on the practice and theory of historical archaeology research and interpretation through a focused study of San Jose's historic Chinese communities. The course includes classroom lectures, seminar discussion, laboratory analysis of historic artifacts, and participation in public archaeology events. Course themes include immigration, urbanization, material culture, landscape, transnational identities, race and ethnicity, gender, cultural resource management, public history, and heritage politics. The course includes required lab sections, field trips, and public service. Transportation will be provided for off-site activities.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2014 | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 213: Culture and Epigenetics: Towards A Non-Darwinian Synthesis (ANTHRO 113, ARCHLGY 113)

The course examines the impact of new research in epigenetics on our understanding of long-term cultural change. The course examines the various attempts that have been made over recent decades to find a synthesis between cultural and biological evolution. These approaches, often termed neo-Darwinian, include memes, dual inheritance theory, theories of cultural selection and transmission, niche construction theory and macro-evolutionary approaches. Research in all these areas will be examined, with particular reference to explanations for the origins of agriculture, but also including other transformations, and critiqued. New research in epigenetics offers an alternative non-Darwinian evolutionary perspective that avoids many of the problems and pitfalls in the neo-Darwinian approaches. Cultural evolution comes to be viewed as cumulative, directional and Lamarckian, since heritable epigenetic variation can underlie evolutionary change. Epigenetics opens the way for human cultural entanglements to become the drivers for evolutionary change, thus allowing the full range of social processes studied in the social and cultural sciences to take their place in the study and analysis of long-term change.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2018 | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 213B: Religious Practices in Archaeological Cultures (ANTHRO 113B, ARCHLGY 113B)

According to Hawkes (1954), religion or ideology is the most difficult part of social life to access archaeologically. Luckily, not all scholars agree; according to Fogelin (2008) 'religion is not something people think about, but something people do¿. Thus, archaeology, an inherently multidisciplinary subject that studies material culture, is well suited to delve into religion and its underpinnings.nThis course will explore religious practices, as they can be defined and interpreted from archaeological contexts spanning the Paleolithic to historic periods. Definitions of religion differ from author to author but they mostly agree that religion is a fully integrated and thus integral part of human social life. Politics, economics, identity and social class influence religion, and religion influences how these forces play out in society. Thus, the course will also examine the significance of ritual and religion in a variety of social contexts.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2016 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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