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221 - 230 of 483 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 176: Cultures, Minds, and Medicine (ANTHRO 276)

This workshop aims to bring together scholars from the social sciences, humanities, medicine and bio-science and technology to explore the ways that health and illness are made through complex social forces. We aim for informal, interactive sessions, full of debate and good will. Dates of meetings will be listed in the notes section in the time schedule.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 178: Evolution and Conservation in Galapagos (ANTHRO 278)

The contribution of research in the Galapagos Islands to our current understanding of evolution and conservation. Writings from Darwin to Dawkins, as they reveal patterns and processes of evolution including selection, adaptation, speciation, and coevolution. Current conservation strategies in the archipelago, and urgent measures needed today before unique species and adaptations are lost.
Last offered: Spring 2017

ANTHRO 178A: Culture, Narrative, and Medicine

This course examines the ways in which medicine is practiced in diverse cultural contexts with narrative skills of recognizing, interpreting and being moved by the stories of illness. It is an examination of the human experience of illness and healing through narratives as presented in literature, film, and storytelling. We explore how cultural resources enable and empower healing and how narrative medicine can guide the practice of culturally competent medical care.
Last offered: Autumn 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-CE, WAY-ED

ANTHRO 178B: History of Medicine

This seminar course will examine medical successes and failures to better understand the politics, economics, and sociality of medicine as a practice and a culture. Examples will be drawn from technical developments such as vaccines; methodological innovations such as randomized control trials; and the study of specific diseases such as yellow fever, cancer, hepatitis, and HIV/AIDS.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Jain, S. (PI)

ANTHRO 179: Cultures of Disease: Cancer and HIV/AIDS (ENGLISH 179)

History, politics, science, and anthropology of cancer; political and economic issues of disease and health care in the U.S., including the ethics and economics of health care provision, the pharmaceutical industry, carcinogen production, and research priorities.
Last offered: Spring 2016

ANTHRO 179A: Health, Illness, and Healing in South Asia (ANTHRO 279A)

This course has three related goals pertinent to medicine and healing in South Asia. The first is to understand the experiences of illness, and therapy in ordinary South Asian communities. How do social and economic inequality, religious commitments, available healing traditions, and community and family contexts shape the experience of illness and healing? The second goal is to think about South Asian medical systems using a broad historical perspective. How had biomedicine been used during the colonial period to manage the health of native populations? What is the legacy of this colonial history on current practices? What happens when South Asian medical traditions (such as Ayurveda) become global? Third, we will explore crucial health problems in South Asia from the perspective of medical anthropology. Possible topics for the third portion of the course include: child birth and maternal health, sex-selection technologies, malnutrition, metabolic diseases, the selling of organs, medical tourism, tuberculosis, HIV, suicide, and schizophrenia.
Last offered: Spring 2013

ANTHRO 179B: Culture of Disease: The Social History of Vaccines

This course will detail the history and develop of vaccines, specifically examining critical issues such as personal choice v. public health, the use of experimental subjects, population-wide medical trials, and the use of animal tissues in vaccine development.
Last offered: Spring 2018

ANTHRO 180: Science, Technology, and Gender

Why is engineering often seen as a masculine profession? What have women's experiences been in entering fields of science and technology? How has gender been defined by scientists? Issues: the struggles of women in science to negotiate misogyny and cultural expectation (marriage, children), reproductive issues (surrogate motherhood, visual representations of the fetus, fetal surgery, breast feeding, childbirth practices), how the household became a site of consumerism and technology, and the cultural issues at stake as women join the ranks of scientists.
Last offered: Winter 2009 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender

ANTHRO 180A: Sex and Power (FEMGEN 180A)

From hook-up culture to pornography and sex work and even Beyoncé's latest album, "Lemonade," our struggles with consent, betrayal, and violence evince collective confusions about the relationship between sex and power in our societies. A quick Google search for news articles on the topic reveals that we must communally brace ourselves, usually through a Public Service Announcement pun, Let's Talk About Sex, and then a warning, Talking about sex can be hard. Cultural and social analyses can help us un-brace ourselves and get closer to meaningfully, and respectfully, talking about how cultural difference and social hierarchies fuel, and our fueled by, ideologies about sex and sexuality. This course examines sex as a nexus of socio-cultural, economic, and political relations of power for individuals and groups across local and global and national and transnational boundaries. And because a lot of the difficulties in talking about sex entail difficulties about ¿seeing¿ sex, this class relies on visual culture and documentary filmmaking alongside ethnographies and theoretical scholarship.
Last offered: Spring 2017

ANTHRO 181: Religion and Science in the Amazon and Elsewhere (ANTHRO 281, RELIGST 270X, RELIGST 370X)

The conversion of native peoples to Christianity, especially Evangelical Christianity, is today a global phenomenon. This course looks to understand the reasons for religious conversion and its consequence in the everyday and ritual practices of Amazonians and their traditional practice of shamanism. We then turn to a question seldom addressed in the literature on conversion: the relationship between religion and science. We will explore the way conversion to Christianity produces changes in conceptions of the world and the person similar to those produced by access to scientific knowledge, which occurs primarily through schooling.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Luhrmann, T. (PI)
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