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181 - 190 of 238 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 330A: The Archive: Form, Practice, Thought

This seminar offers a wide-ranging exploration of the `archive.' Drawing from ethnography, social theory, philosophy, photography and literature, we will examine the archive's diverse material, narratological and structural dimensions, its epistemological, political and representational functions, processes of archivisation and recuperation, and related domains of experience, memory, absence and loss. Prerequisite: consent of instructor
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

ANTHRO 331: Populism

This course examines the concept of populism. Course readings include works in political theory and recent ethnographies. We will ask how these texts reframe core problems in anthropology, including the affective dimensions of social life, relations of friend and enemy, and theories of language and signification.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Tambar, K. (PI)

ANTHRO 332: Anthropology of Ethics

Recent decades have witnessed what some scholars have termed an ethical turn in anthropology. This course explores the emergence of this field of study, asking the following questions: What has motivated a renewed anthropological interest in the subject of ethics? How has a focus on ethics enabled the development of new theoretical currents in the discipline? To what extent have anthropological studies of ethics provided new understandings of traditional topics, concerning social hierarchy, power relations, embodiment, and subject-formation?
Last offered: Spring 2018

ANTHRO 337: VOICES

This course takes an anthropological perspective on psychotic voices, voices of resistance (mad and sane), voices of authority, voices of spirit, the sense of communication from another seen or unseen. We end with the writer's voice and how students can cultivate their own voice. We read first person examples and a range of theory, including Bakhtin, Lacan, Willy Apollon, Piaget and Vygotsky, and Elyn Saks, Zora Neale Hurston, Zadie Smith and EB White. Texts may shift depending on student input.nPrerequisite: Instructor approval
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Luhrmann, T. (PI)

ANTHRO 338B: History and Memory

How are history and memory important in the making of collective and public memory? This seminar draws together an interdisciplinary collection of readings with an aim to provide a foundation for seminar participants¿ projects, both historical and contemporary projects. We will explore critiques of the practice of gathering material, i.e., archival and oral histories as well as delve into experimental forms that combine improvisational approaches to history and critique in an effort to develop a methodological tool kit that allows for a push beyond established projects.
Last offered: Winter 2018

ANTHRO 339: Anthropology of Religion (RELIGST 343X)

This course presents classic and contemporary work on the anthropology of religion: Durkheim Elementary Forms of the Religious Life; Levy-Bruhl; Primitive Mentality; Douglas Purity and Danger; Evans Pritchard Nuer Religion; and recent ethnographies/scholarly work by Robbins, Keane, Keller, Boyer, Barrett, and others. Prerequisite: consent of instructor
Last offered: Spring 2020

ANTHRO 340A: Fit: The Anthropology of Sports, Medicine, and Debility

Sport has long been a domain in which everyday people, medical professionals and political authorities have interfaced with the making of institutional definitions and social norms regarding fitness and debility. This course will challenge students to reflect on that interface through consideration of recent research findings within sociocultural anthropology and allied fields.
Last offered: Winter 2020

ANTHRO 341: Entitlement: Kinship, Property and Inheritance

This graduate seminar explores anthropological approaches to property, kinship and inheritance. It approaches property and kinship as social relations among people and as such call for analyses of the dynamic and unstable processes through which they are constituted, reproduced, and changed over time. Rather than accept conventional distinctions between tangible and intangible property, private and public property, nature and commodities, this course scrutinizes the cultural and social processes through which these categories themselves are constructed and along with them relations of inequality, entitlement, and difference. It investigates the ways in which people (both individuals and communities) are constituted in relation to their claims on things. At a time when new forms and claims of property are increasingly asserted and challenged in a variety of contexts, an understanding of the different bases upon which property rights can be claimed and upon which they can be distinguished from other types of social obligation is a central component of anthropological analyses of the production of new inequalities and differentiations globally.

ANTHRO 342B: Cultural Heritage in Global Perspective

This seminar will explore the ideas surrounding the theories, discourses, and practices surrounding cultural heritage. Heritage has become inscribed in the planning of urban and rural landscapes, designed as tourist destinations, and considered a universal good in global cosmopolitan society. But it would be well to ask: what kind of "culture" has been labeled as heritage? What kind of organizations, economics, and politics are necessary to sustain it? How are these put in place? By whom? For whom? How can we study this global phenomenon? Over the course of the quarter, students will engage with readings that discuss how cultural heritage is communicated to the public, the relationship between academic critique and pragmatic social engagement, and methodologies for research about heritage. nn Pre-requisite by instructor consent.
Terms: Win | Units: 5

ANTHRO 345: New Visions in Medical Anthropology

Recent experimental histories of the field. Emphasis is on how, working within anthropology's classic format, the ethnographic monograph, authors have innovatively responded to the challenges of representing amorphous, unspoken, and often violent relationships between the body and social change. The authors' expository techniques, and how they engage and extend theoretical debate. How to assess works within medical anthropology and its allied fields. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Last offered: Winter 2018
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