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171 - 180 of 472 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 147: Nature, Culture, Heritage (ANTHRO 247)

Seminar. Shared histories of natural and cultural heritage and their subsequent trajectories into the present. How thought about archaeological sites and natural landscapes have undergone transformations due to factors including indigenous rights, green politics, and international tourism. The development of key ideas including conservation, wilderness, sustainability, indigenous knowledge, non-renewability and diversity. Case studies draw on cultural and natural sites from Africa, the Americas and Australia.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2013 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 147B: World Heritage in Global Conflict (ANTHRO 247B, ARCHLGY 147B)

Heritage is always political, it is typically said. Such a statement might refer to the everyday politics of local stakeholder interests on one end of the spectrum, or the volatile politics of destruction and erasure of heritage during conflict, on the other. If heritage is always political then one might expect that the workings of World Heritage might be especially fraught given the international dimension. In particular, the intergovernmental system of UNESCO World Heritage must navigate the inherent tension between state sovereignty and nationalist interests and the wider concerns of a universal regime. The World Heritage List has over 1000 properties has many such contentious examples, including sites in Iraq, Mali, Syria, Crimea, Palestine and Cambodia. As an organization UNESCO was born of war with an explicit mission to end global conflict and help the world rebuild materially and morally, but has found it¿s own history increasingly entwined with that of international politics and violence.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 148: Health, Politics, and Culture of Modern China (ANTHRO 248, CHINA 155A, CHINA 255A)

One of the most generative regions for medical anthropology inquiry in recent years has been Asia. This seminar is designed to introduce upper division undergraduates and graduate students to the methodological hurdles, representational challenges, and intellectual rewards of investigating the intersections of health, politics, and culture in contemporary China.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kohrman, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 149: South Asia: History, People, Politics (ANTHRO 249)

The South Asian subcontinent (comprising of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan and Sri Lanka) is one of the most diverse and densely populated regions in the world and increasingly prominent in new global political and cultural economies. South Asia has also provided the inspiration for cutting edge theories about the colonial state, postcolonial studies, democracy, popular culture, and religious conflict. The course will provide an overview of major historical events and social trends in contemporary South Asia and focus on themes such as gender, religion, caste, migration and movement, new technologies, the urban and rural, the state, and new forms of consumption among others.Thus, the course will give students historically and theoretically informed perspectives on contemporary South Asia, as well as how to apply insights learned to larger debates within the political and social sciences.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2014 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 149A: Cities and Citizens in the Middle East (URBANST 144)

This course will explore historical formation of cities and citizens in the Eastern Mediterranean since the 19th century.We will explore urban development, economy, social classes and local politics with a focus Egypt and Turkey and in particular two world-historical cities, Cairo and Istanbul. Drawing on history, cultural anthropology, geography and sociology disciplines, we will examine how urban space in Egypt and Turkey have reconfigured through histories of colonialism, nationalism, developmentalism and globalization. Rural to urban immigration, informality, gendered places, consumption, urban regeneration, local politics and branding the city will be the themes of our discussion. We will study these themes in relation to two main questions: How do spatial changes engender new social practices and redefine cultural difference?; How do power struggles at the intersection of local and global interests shape urban change? It will be of interest for urban studies majors and other students at all levels who would like to study urban struggles and change in Turkey, Egypt, the Middle East and the Global South.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2014 | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 150: The Ordinary: The History of a Concept (ANTHRO 250)

The ordinary has today acquired something like a cultic status in contemporary culture. `Ordinary¿ citizens are the touchstone and essence of political democracy; the holy grail of effective marketing, the byword for earthy ethical judgment. In social science, the ordinary has blended in with the `normal¿ and the statistical mean. In Anthropology, ordinary life has all but replaced `cultural practice¿ as the epistemic gold standard of evidence. But this was not always so, and the ordinary has many, varied and contradictory meanings across the world.nThis course will (a) trace the historical emergence of the ordinary as a central ideological and metaphysical concept in modern thought and practice; (b) trace how the ordinary and the everyday have acquired unprecedented authority in anthropology; (3) trace the varies meanings and connotations of `the ordinary¿ in different socio-historical contexts from Asia, Africa and Euro-America.nThe literature will consist of ethnographies, and works of philosophical and historical scholarship.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 150B: Fire: Social and Ecological Contexts of Conflagration

Over 1 million acres burned from California wildland fires in 2018, yet conservative estimates suggest that four times as many acres burned annually in California preceding European colonialism. In this course we will explore how climate, land management, urban development, and human social institutions contribute to contrasts in wild and prescribed (intentional anthropogenic) fire patterns worldwide. We will investigate the socio-ecological values and harms associated with different fire and land-use policies and practices, ranging from Indigenous and small-scale contexts, conservation projects, and large-scale fire suppression efforts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 151A: Contemporary Chinese Society Through Independent Documentary Film (ANTHRO 251A)

An overview of social issues in contemporary China as seen through its emerging independent documentary film movement. Topics covered include representations of history, political power and accountability in the reform era, human rights, urbanization, the environment, homelessness and inequality, sexualities, addiction, and the role of media in society. Each viewing is accompanied by readings in media theory or the anthropological/sociological study of contemporary China. Can be taken with or without research component. Films include English subtitles.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2014 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 152: Ritual, Politics, Power (SOC 156)

Our everyday lives are made up of multiple routines, some consciously staged and imagined and others unconscious and insidious. Anthropologists call these rituals. Rituals shape every aspect of our lives, creating our symbolic universes and governing the most minute of our practices. nnFor early anthropologists and for those interested in religious and symbolic life, rituals and rites were seen as both one of the most universal features of human existence, and, as that which enables us to reflect upon our human existence. A prominent example are that of the ¿rites de passage¿ found in every culture, from puberty initiation rites, weddings or funerals, which socially signal the change from one status to another. While initially for anthropologists, rituals marked the difference between the sacred and the profane, soon scholars began to see the ubiquity of ritual and the symbolic in shaping even the most mundane activity such as the structure of a meal and why one is not meant to eat dessert before the main course. The first half of the class examines these different debates surrounding the meaning and effects of rituals and rites. The second half of the class takes these debates to think about the question of power and politics. We return to the question of how our symbolic universes are staged and imagined by us through ritual forms such as the annual Presidential ¿pardoning the turkey¿ at Thanksgiving. The question of power however pushes us even further to ask why it is that we obey particular kinds of authority, consent to particular actions, and find ourselves doing things we haven¿t consciously decided to do. Many have argued that these kinds of political questions about how we respond and are shaped by power have something to do with our symbolic worlds and ritual, from the most obvious (the monarchy) to the most subtle (listening in a classroom). Throughout the course, these abstract questions will be grounded in cross-cultural examples and analysis.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 152A: Urban Poverty and Inequality in Contemporary China

Experiences of poverty and inequality and their relationship to gender, space development, post-socialism, and globalization. How processes of class-making in China's cities are bound up with transformations in the country's sociopolitcal landscape.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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