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161 - 170 of 472 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 142A: Youth in the Global South: Beyond Active Subjects and Passive Objects (CSRE 124A)

In this course, we will explore the wide variety of ways youth has been culturally constructed (as well as dynamically experienced) across the Global South. Youth is an enduring and powerful concept for understanding competing forms of cultural contestations and political transformations. In the wake of global economic inequality, political instabilities and the emergence of new indigenous movements and social demands, youth is simultaneously associated with discourses over ¿crisis¿ and ¿possibilities.¿
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2016 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 142B: Anthropology of the Internet

This course provides students with an introduction to anthropological approaches to the Internet as an object, and site, of study. Special attention is paid to the ways in which online media are changing the practices and materiality of politics. By reading recently published ethnographic analyses alongside classic anthropological and social theory texts students will come to a better understanding of the co-constitution of the Internet and contemporary social and political life.nnThough many Internet phenomena and websites are celebrated and discussed for their novelty, the questions and issues they present resonate with topics of longstanding anthropological concern. Each week of the course will be dedicated to bringing established anthropological frameworks to bear on a different aspect of the sociality and materiality of the net. How, for example, can anthropological theorizations of citizenship and publics help us make sense of ¿fake news¿ and ¿Twitter revolutions¿? How can Anderson¿s work on the role of the printing press in the emergence of the nation help us understand the ways in which blogs and online discussion boards facilitate transnational ¿imagined communities¿?
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 143: Title Social Change in Contemporary China: Modernity and the Middle Kingdom (ANTHRO 243)

Over the last twenty years, residents of the People¿s Republic of China have experienced dramatic changes in nearly every facet of life. This undergraduate seminar introduces students to contemporary China through an examination of various types of social transformation. We will analyze how PRC residents of different backgrounds are confronting such processes as economic liberalization, migration, kinship transformation, sexual commodification, media proliferation, industrialization, and transnationalism? Priority is placed on reading, discussing and assessing research that uses qualitative methods and that situates political economy in dialogue with lived experience.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 143B: Anthropology and International Development

International development as a set of projects, policies, and controversies has been a major force in shaping the world over the past seventy years. Throughout, the discipline of anthropology has been involved¿both as participant and as critical observer. After a brief overview of development theory and history, this course will discuss (1) the ways in which anthropology has contributed to development projects and ideas and (2) how the discipline has critiqued development practice over the past three decades. What has anthropology offered to those who work towards social and economic development¿and how has development shaped the discipline itself? Readings will include detailed ethnographic and historical case studies from across the developing world.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2014 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 144: Art and the Repair of the Self (ANTHRO 244)

Engaging the body/mind and its senses in the making of images and things has long been considered to have potentially great therapeutic significance. This course is a close examination of making as a form of therapy, as a form of communication, and, vitally, as a form of knowing. As such, it suggests new, analytically powerful possibilities for anthropological practice.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2019 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 144B: The Buddhist Body in East Asia: Charisma, Gender, and the Gift of the Body (ANTHRO 244B)

This course introduces Buddhist practices and texts of embodiment as a subject of the anthropology of the body. We draw on research in social/cultural anthropology, history, and religious studies, and examine a selection of approaches to the Buddhist body: the body of power in Buddhist charisma, the gender of the bodhisattva¿s and monastic body, the techniques of the body in meditation and martial arts, healing and cultivation, and the gift of the body in bioethics and medical education. We draw on examples in different traditions of Buddhism in a range of societies with a special focus on Chinese Buddhism.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2015 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 145: Race and Power (ANTHRO 245, CSRE 145F)

This course examines how race is made. We will pay close attention to how people engage with material, economic, scientific, and cultural forces to articulate human group difference as a given, and even natural. In this seminar, we will look at the construction of race as a literally made phenomenon, where historical, colonial, bodily, market, and humanitarian constituent elements both circulate and sediment racial understandings. To focus our readings and discussions we will divide this vast terrain into three units: race and the colonial encounter, race and biopower, and race and capital.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2015 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 145B: Reinventing the Other: Greeks, Romans, Barbarians

Ancient ethnography was a highly conventionalized tradition stretching from "the father of History," Herodotus, to the last historian of the ancient world, Procopius. We will read selections of these two authors' works as well as of Sallust, Tacitus, and lesser known ones. Within various theoretical frameworks'rhetorical, anthropological, structuralist we will reconstruct the shifting images of The Other, explore what they tell us about their producers, and reflect on what ancient ethnography contributed to its modern descendant.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2013 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 146A: Anthropology of Youth

This course will be a survey of classical texts and contemporary research on youth and generations. We will explore the historical and cultural construction of `youth¿ and youth practices across regions over time. We will pay special attention to the organization of contemporary capitalism, its effect in producing marginality and exclusion, and issues underlying youth political movements.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 146B: Global Heritage, World Heritage: History and Intersections in Contemporary Society (ARCHLGY 146B)

This Course will provide an overview of global heritage by focusing on the UNESCO World Heritage Program, which is based on an international treaty, the 1972 Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage. The first part of the course will provide an historical overview on the development of the international preservation movements, the second part of the course will concentrate on how anthropology can contribute to the study of intergovernmental organizations and cultural bureaucracies, the third part and will discuss specific issues related to heritage by providing case studies from the World Heritage. This course will provide theoretical and empirical interpretations of contemporary issues in heritage and will give students a critical understanding of the complexities related to various uses of past in the present.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2015 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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