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1 - 10 of 390 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 1: Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 201)

Crosscultural anthropological perspectives on human behavior, including cultural transmission, social organization, sex and gender, culture change, technology, war, ritual, and related topics. Case studies illustrating the principles of the cultural process. Films.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 1S: Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 101S)

Crosscultural anthropological perspectives on human behavior, including cultural transmission, social organization, sex and gender, culture change, technology, war, ritual, and related topics. Case studies illustrating the principles of the cultural process. Films.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 3: Introduction to Prehistoric Archeology (ARCHLGY 1)

Aims, methods, and data in the study of human society's development from early hunters through late prehistoric civilizations. Archaeological sites and remains characteristic of the stages of cultural development for selected geographic areas, emphasizing methods of data collection and analysis appropriate to each.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Rick, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 4: Language and Culture (ANTHRO 204)

Comparative approach, using examples from many languages. Emphasis is on generally non-Western speech communities. Topics include: the structure of language; the theory of signs; vocabulary and culture; grammar, cognition, and culture (linguistic relativism and determinism); encodability of cultural information in language; language adaptiveness to social function; the ethnography of speaking; registers; discourse (conversation, narrative, verbal art); language and power; language survival and extinction; and linguistic ideology (beliefs about language).
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
Instructors: Fox, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 10A: The Archaeology of Home (ARCHLGY 10)

Homes evoke powerful emotions about place and also highlight the dynamic and complex nature of people, their relationships, and the broader society they live in. Focus on the ways that material traces from the past shed light on the diversity of domestic life, which includes household organization, economic strategies, diet and status, rituals, and identity. Archaeological case studies to see how archaeologists identify reoccurring patterns in material culture found in homes or domestic dwellings to reconstruct household patterns and social relations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Bautista, S. (PI)

ANTHRO 13A: Islamic Routes: Archaeology and Heritage of Muslim Societies (ARCHLGY 13, HISTORY 7E, HISTORY 107E)

How has archaeology changed our knowledge of the spread of Islam and past Muslim societies? How does archaeology shape heritage debates, conflicts and ideas about Islam today? Topics include the city and urban change, secular and religious life, gender, economy, and globalization. These topics are explored using archaeological and critical heritage approaches. Focus is on examples drawn from Syria-Palestine, Egypt, Iraq, Arabian Peninsula, India, and Africa. Sources include archaeological data and material culture, historical texts in translation, and photography.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Simpson, I. (PI)

ANTHRO 15: Sex and Gender

Commonality and diversity of gender roles in crosscultural perspective. Cultural, ecological, and evolutionary explanations for such diversity. Theory of the evolution of sex and gender, changing views about men's and women's roles in human evolution, conditions under which gender roles vary in contemporary societies, and issues surrounding gender equality, power, and politics.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 22N: Ethnographies of North America: An Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology

Preference to freshmen. Ethnographic look at human behavior, including cultural transmission, social organization, sex and gender, culture change, and related topics in N. America. Films.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

ANTHRO 24N: Maya Hieroglyphic Writing

Preference to freshmen. Decipherment of classic Maya writing. Principles of archaeological decipherment. Maya calendrical, astronomical, historical, mythological, and political texts on stone, wood, bone, shell, murals, ceramics, and books (screenfold codices). Archaeology and ethnohistory of Maya scribal practice and literacy. Related Mesoamerican writing systems. The evolution of writing and the relevance of writing to theories of culture and civilization.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom

ANTHRO 28N: Secularism and its Critics

Secularism is often taken to be a necessary prerequisite for democracy in the modern world. The separation of religion and politics is often written into constitutions as a fundamental priority. Yet around the world, growing numbers of religious movements have sought to dispute the legitimacy of secularism. Social scientists, including anthropologists, are beginning to research the forms of domination and political violence that have been justified in the name of secularism. This course seeks to make sense of this global debate about secularism. It does so by taking up an anthropological perspective: much as anthropologists might study culture, religion, or kinship, we will interrogate secularism as a comparative social artifact, constituted by historically specific repertoires of signs, identities, everyday practices, and institutional powers. The course focuses on case studies in the United States, Western Europe, the Middle East, and South Asia.
| UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
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