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401 - 410 of 462 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 353: Landscape

This seminar offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of landscape, noting the various processes and projects that have help create them. Readings draw together a broad range of theoretical approaches that are attentive to human-non-human interactions and the overlapping and divergent spatial and temporal questions of the exchanges between landscapes and humans. The readings will also draw attention to representational and non-representational ways that material and symbolic aspects of landscapes help constitute the making of place. The aim of the seminar is to explore the various methodologies for what they offer for the study of place.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2016 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 355: Cities in Global Perspective

Interdisciplinary approach to examining global cities. The concept of the global city, and the interdependent processes that help produce urban spaces. Situating the transformation of urban spaces within globalization and its differential effects; current explanatory frameworks that pay attention to multiple scales of spatial and economic articulation. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2012 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 356: The Anthropology of Development

Multidisciplinary. Topics vary annually. Areas include Africa, S. Asia, and Latin America. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 356A: The Universal and the Vernacular. The Global Life of Concepts and Social Forms

Mapping and understanding vernacular concepts and terminologies has always been central to the anthropological quest to understand societies from `a native point of view'. This has often been accompanied by a critique of universalist and Euro-centric assumptions in the social sciences and in social theory. As a result, the convention has become to treat the `universal¿ (ideas, frames, institutions) as external, often imposed by colonial powers, while the `vernacular¿ conventionally is seen as local and authentic, and the proper site of anthropology.nThis course seeks to rethink this spatial and historical distinction between the universal and the vernacular. Instead we ask: how, and when, do concepts, or practices, become embedded in a vernacular world? Reversely, instead of assuming that universals all originate in Euro-America, we ask: how do concepts and practices become both global and universal? We will trace how impactful ideologies, social forms and institutions have travelled i more »
Mapping and understanding vernacular concepts and terminologies has always been central to the anthropological quest to understand societies from `a native point of view'. This has often been accompanied by a critique of universalist and Euro-centric assumptions in the social sciences and in social theory. As a result, the convention has become to treat the `universal¿ (ideas, frames, institutions) as external, often imposed by colonial powers, while the `vernacular¿ conventionally is seen as local and authentic, and the proper site of anthropology.nThis course seeks to rethink this spatial and historical distinction between the universal and the vernacular. Instead we ask: how, and when, do concepts, or practices, become embedded in a vernacular world? Reversely, instead of assuming that universals all originate in Euro-America, we ask: how do concepts and practices become both global and universal? We will trace how impactful ideologies, social forms and institutions have travelled in time to become perceived as elements of vernacular cultures. nDrawing on ethnographic and historical examples across the world, each week will trace the universal and vernacular lives of important concepts such as: `tradition¿, `the individual¿, `community¿, `the people¿; `humanity¿, `dignity¿; `equality¿, `sacrifice¿, `cosmopolitanism¿, `civility¿.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hansen, T. (PI)

ANTHRO 357: Other Minds: Puzzles in Psychiatric and Psychological Anthropology

Problems in the way anthropologists explore other minds anthropologically and the ways in which anthropologists seek to understand the models of other minds held by the people observed. Topics include theory of mind, witchcraft, belief, empathy, psychosis, trauma, Freud, Vygotsky, and cognitive dissonance. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Under grads cannot take this class without permission of the instructor.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2010 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 358: Anthropology and the Limit of Experience

In this course, we will examine the concept of the ¿limit¿ in relation to questions of experience. Taking an interdisciplinary perspective, we will explore how the limit (as border, threshold, other, transgression, liminality, etc.) frames and disrupts discourses of experience in ethnography, philosophy and literature.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2014 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 359: Copies, Collections, and Commodities

In this class we will grapple with multiple questions that arise with reproduction. On the one hand, reproduciblity is good: we want generic drugs to work as well as the originals, we want trial subjects to adequately stand in for the people likely to be having a treatment, and we want a cartographic map to describe the landscape that unfolds before us. On the other hand, the copy threatens the value the object it is meant to imitate or represent, and to take on a life of its own. A series of classic and new ethnographies will be organized around these issues.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2014 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 360A: Archival Research for Social Science: A Practicuum

Since the 1980s, the necessity of historicizing cultural and social formations has become established as integral to anthropological research. Every ethnography and dissertation has historical sections, derived primarily from secondary sources, commentaries within other ethnographies and published historical work. Most students attempt to conduct archival research in local or national archives alongside ethnographic fieldwork, most often in an ad hoc manner, collecting and analyzing archival material on a trial and error basis. This class is conceived as a practicum that addresses students who need to and want to do archival research as part of their anthropological and sociological fieldwork, but find themselves at a loss for how to think about, begin, and, do archival work.nnThe base layer of the class is methodological and practical: students will be engaged in the practical activities of becoming acquainted with archives, developing archival research questions, learning techniques more »
Since the 1980s, the necessity of historicizing cultural and social formations has become established as integral to anthropological research. Every ethnography and dissertation has historical sections, derived primarily from secondary sources, commentaries within other ethnographies and published historical work. Most students attempt to conduct archival research in local or national archives alongside ethnographic fieldwork, most often in an ad hoc manner, collecting and analyzing archival material on a trial and error basis. This class is conceived as a practicum that addresses students who need to and want to do archival research as part of their anthropological and sociological fieldwork, but find themselves at a loss for how to think about, begin, and, do archival work.nnThe base layer of the class is methodological and practical: students will be engaged in the practical activities of becoming acquainted with archives, developing archival research questions, learning techniques of recording, coding, and thinking historically. The second layer will be conceptual. Students will be reading and discussing concepts of the archive, reading and analyzing different styles of historical ethnographies, and thinking about how to organize and conceptualize cultural categories historically.nnStudents will be asked to conduct archival research at the archives available at Stanford Libraries and the Hoover Institution archives and write a research paper based on this archival work. We will have weekly meetings divided into two sessions. The first half will discuss set readings and intellectual concern. In the second half, we will discuss methodological concerns, problems encountered in the archives and bounce ideas off each other. We will also have regular guest speakers who will give talks and answer questions, intellectual and methodological about archival research.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 361: Life and Death in Contemporary Latin America: An Anthropological Inquiry

This seminar explores life and death in contemporary Latin America. We will address anthropological understanding of the role of colonialism, migration, violence, urbanization, democratic transition and neoliberalism as they configure the experience of, and threshold between, vital and deadly processes. nnThis is not a standard survey course, covering the region as a whole however. Instead, we will critically engage several recent ethnographies that explore, for example: the politics and practices of memory; border thinking and living; the political economy of death and desire; state violence and social movements; the relationship between the laboring city and body. We will supplement ethnographies with contemporary Latin American critical theory, film, and literary texts. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2013 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 362: Human Spatial Dynamics: Seminar in Communicating Contemporary Science

This seminar is designed to bring together all students and faculty currently working on issues related to human use of land and spatially defined resources. The focus is to provide a forum for reporting on recent results and question development, providing students with vital skills in designing and communicating the results of research. Under grads by permission of instructor.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2010 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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