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111 - 120 of 462 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 120F: Buying Black: Economic Sovereignty, Race, and Entrepreneurship in the USA (AFRICAAM 120F, CSRE 120F)

This seminar examines how communities of color have critiqued and transformed capitalism in America through concepts of economic independence, entrepreneurship, and sovereignty. By tracing concepts such as the double-duty dollar, casino/tribal capitalisms, retail boycotts, and buying black, the course traces ethnic entrepreneurialism in America. Students will also consider the international context of such US-based movements, particularly in relation to American imperialism and global supply-chain capitalism.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 121: Language and Prehistory (ANTHRO 221)

Language classification and its implications for human prehistory. The role of linguistic data in analyzing prehistoric populations, cultures, contact, and migrations. Comparison of linguistic and biological classifications. Reconstruction, proto-vocabularies, and culture. Archaeological decipherment and the origins and evolution of writing. Archaeological and genetic evidence for human migrations. (DA-A; HEF II,III)
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2016 | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 121A: Hip Hop, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language (AFRICAAM 121X, AMSTUD 121X, CSRE 121X, EDUC 121, LINGUIST 155)

Focus is on issues of language, identity, and globalization, with a focus on Hip Hop cultures and the verbal virtuosity within the Hip Hop nation. Beginning with the U.S., a broad, comparative perspective in exploring youth identities and the politics of language in what is now a global Hip Hop movement. Readings draw from the interdisciplinary literature on Hip Hop cultures with a focus on sociolinguistics and youth culture.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2013 | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 121B: Vital Infrastructures: The Foundations of Modern Life

Infrastructure describes the material grids that exist beneath society, economy and culture: the foundation upon which everyday life rests and depends. While meant to remain invisible, out of sight and out of mind, diverse infrastructures have become lightning rods for political protest and demands for justice, rights, and a good life. From anti-dam activism in India, to campaigns for clean drinking water in South Africa, to transportation networks in urban Bolivia, and to the energy networks of the United States, infrastructure reveals the connections and disconnections of the globalized world. Taking an anthropological perspective, this course asks: why has infrastructure taken on vital importance to the modern nation-state? What do infrastructural histories reveal about the vital political ideals like freedom, development, equality, and nature? When does infrastructure take on a life of its own, undermining even the best laid plans? What happens when infrastructures fail? Through multi-disciplinary readings and exploratory assignments, this course challenges students see the world beneath their feet in new ways and to trace the material connections that define and sustain modern life itself.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 122A: Race and Culture in Mexico and Central America (ANTHRO 222A)

This course addresses the role of racial ideologies in the historical configuration of multiple hierarchies of inequality that determine the place of everyone in society in Mexico and Central America. Based on readings from the humanities and social sciences, we will discuss the cultural and racial politics of authoritarianism and indigenous insurgency, emphasizing narratives of laziness and vagrancy that have been central to the discipline of labor that shapes local processes of regressive modernization and nation building. We will analyze the hegemony of dictatorship as political necessity, the relationship between local racisms and global Whiteness, and the emergence of new local and transnational contestations to the multiple hierarchies that determine the place of everyone in society.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2015 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 122C: Research in Maya Hieroglyphic Writing (ANTHRO 222C)

Workshop. Current issues in the decipherment and analysis of Maya hieroglyphic writing and literacy.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2015 | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 123: Readings in Linguistic Anthropology (ANTHRO 223)

One or two major related works on language in its cultural context. Works for 2007-08 involve attempts to correlate linguistic and non-linguistic data for analysis of prehistoric human contact and migrations. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 123A: Debating Repatriation (ANTHRO 223A, ARCHLGY 123A)

The debates over the return of cultural property have raged for centuries. At stake are key questions about the rights of Indigenous peoples, intellectual freedom, nationalism, globalization, heritage management, the meaning of history, and the purpose of museums in the world. This seminar examines these vital discussions that intersect law and morality, science and religion, culture and politics. Discussions will be informed by cross-cultural, legal, ethical perspectives, exploring both the philosophical and practical implications of the repatriation debates. This course will provide students with a nuanced historical viewpoint of museum collections, heritage policies, and legal dimensions that underpin contests over cultural property.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 123B: Government of Water and Crisis: Corporations, States and the Environment

As the Flint, Michigan water situation began to attract attention and condemnation, Michigan State Representative, Sheldon Neeley, describing the 200 troops on the ground and the Red Cross distributing water bottles, said that the Governor had ¿turned an American city into a Third World country [¿] it¿s terrible what he¿s done [¿] no fresh water.¿ Then at the first Congressional hearing, the Chairman of the House Oversight & Government Reform Committee, Jason Chaffetz, said, ¿This is the United States of America ¿ this isn't supposed to happen here. We are not some Third World country.¿nnWhat is a `third world problem¿? And is the `water problem¿ the same across the world? This course examines how water is governed in a time that is increasingly seen as one of crisis. We will examine how crises are imagined, constructed, sought to be averted, and the governance regimes they give rise to. And how does water, whether as natural resource, public good, a human right, or commodity, determin more »
As the Flint, Michigan water situation began to attract attention and condemnation, Michigan State Representative, Sheldon Neeley, describing the 200 troops on the ground and the Red Cross distributing water bottles, said that the Governor had ¿turned an American city into a Third World country [¿] it¿s terrible what he¿s done [¿] no fresh water.¿ Then at the first Congressional hearing, the Chairman of the House Oversight & Government Reform Committee, Jason Chaffetz, said, ¿This is the United States of America ¿ this isn't supposed to happen here. We are not some Third World country.¿nnWhat is a `third world problem¿? And is the `water problem¿ the same across the world? This course examines how water is governed in a time that is increasingly seen as one of crisis. We will examine how crises are imagined, constructed, sought to be averted, and the governance regimes they give rise to. And how does water, whether as natural resource, public good, a human right, or commodity, determine the contours of such regimes? We will focus mostly on ethnographies, but also examine texts produced by government bodies and aid and environmental organizations, as well as case law. The course will show what anthropology can contribute to the conversation on state and corporate bureaucracies, and their relation with water.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hayat, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 124: Maya Mythology and the Popol Vuh

The mythology and folklore of the ancient Maya, emphasizing the relationship between the 16th-century Quiché Maya mythological epic Popol Vuh (Book of the Council) and classic lowland Maya art, architecture, religion, and politics. General Mesoamerican mythology. Anthropological and other theories of mythology. Class participates in the creation of a web project on the Popol Vuh.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2010 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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