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431 - 440 of 483 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 363A: Anthropology of Environmental Conservation

Graduate seminar focused on key works by anthropologists on environmental conservation. We will discuss both classics (ie, works by Ostrom, Lansing, Bray) as well recent debates regarding communities, neoliberalism and conservation. Students will present on topics of particular interest or relevance to their research.
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 364: EcoGroup: Current Topics in Ecological, Evolutionary, and Environmental Anthropology

Seminar; restricted to graduate students. Topics vary with instructor. How to ask appropriate questions, how to derive research hypotheses from theory, how to design methodologies for testing hypotheses, and how to present results by reading and critiquing key contemporary papers in the field. Ph.D. students enrolling in this course to fulfill the department review course requirement must enroll in 5 units. Graduate students enrolling in this course to participate in a topical forum may enroll in 2 units. Course may be repeated for 2 units. Prerequisites: by consent of instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 364A: EcoGroup: Problems in Ecological and Evolutionary Anthropology

Seminar; restricted to graduate students. Topics vary with instructor. How to ask appropriate questions, how to derive research hypotheses from theory, how to design methodologies for testing hypotheses, and how to present results by reading and critiquing key contemporary papers in the field. Ph.D. students enrolling in this course to fulfill the department review course requirement must enroll in 5 units. Graduate students enrolling in this course to participate in a topical forum may enroll in 2 units. Course may be repeated for 2 units. Prerequisites: by consent of instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2011

ANTHRO 365: The Theory of the Modern Subject

This course traces the emergence of a coherent theory of the modern subject through readings of philosophical works and social theory from 18th century to the 20th century. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor
Last offered: Spring 2013

ANTHRO 365A: Emancipation: Theories and Experiences

Concepts of emancipation have been treated in a wide variety of historical, political, regional and social perspectives. In the US, emancipation and post emancipation societies are primarily understood around histories of enslavement. In the class, while taking inspiration and also covering work on enslavement and emancipation, we will endeavor to discuss theories, ideas and experiences that have been understood as potentially emancipatory from a globally and historically wide-ranging set of ideas. Issues of race, caste, class and gender are axiomatic themes within the class.nEmancipation has frequently been understood as an emancipation from oppression and an impetus towards a form of freedom or new order. While theoretically this is formally understood and discussed, often with historical examples that use experiences to illustrate failures or successes, in this class we will try to understand the texture of practices as the primary means by which ideas about emancipation circulate, more »
Concepts of emancipation have been treated in a wide variety of historical, political, regional and social perspectives. In the US, emancipation and post emancipation societies are primarily understood around histories of enslavement. In the class, while taking inspiration and also covering work on enslavement and emancipation, we will endeavor to discuss theories, ideas and experiences that have been understood as potentially emancipatory from a globally and historically wide-ranging set of ideas. Issues of race, caste, class and gender are axiomatic themes within the class.nEmancipation has frequently been understood as an emancipation from oppression and an impetus towards a form of freedom or new order. While theoretically this is formally understood and discussed, often with historical examples that use experiences to illustrate failures or successes, in this class we will try to understand the texture of practices as the primary means by which ideas about emancipation circulate, imagined, are discussed, are disappointed and so on. We will try and see what an anthropological and historically textured discussion can bring to theoretical discussions of emancipation. We will examine theoretical, historical, sociological and anthropological writings on emancipation, freedom, enslavement and servitude, political mobilization and revolution. Fundamentally this course tries to get students to think globally about multiple and different systems of persisting and enduring oppression and inequality through an emphasis on political thought, political imaginations and concrete political organizations and movements.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

ANTHRO 366: Material Semiotics

This seminar will focus on the emerging body of literature on the materiality of the production, circulation, and mediation of paperwork as constituitive of modern forms of governance. We will discuss specific genres of paperworks¿notes, memos, files, documents, as well as archives and other mnemonic technologies¿both as cultural practices and reflexive objects, and examine how they produce modern social epistemologies of accountability, evidence, the fact, and truth in the fields of law, business, and public administration, as well as in civil society generally. Readings will include works by Max Weber, Bruno Latour, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Cornelia Vismann, Ann Stoler, and others. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Inoue, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 366W: Semiotics for Ethnography (EDUC 366W)

This workshop-style seminar will introduce students to a range of semiotic and linguistic anthropological approaches and tools for ethnographic analysis. A group of (linguistic) anthropologists from other universities will be invited to offer workshops, through which students will learn 1. how to teach semiotics in anthropology courses and 2. how to use semiotic concepts for their own research projects.
Last offered: Winter 2019

ANTHRO 367: The Anthropology of Science: Global Politics and Laboratory Life

Science and technology are important cultural products that often dramatically reorganize various aspects of human life. In this course we will explore how recent innovations in the life sciences and biomedicine may reconfigure crucial elements of social institutions, lend new structures to identity politics, and often change the way we interact with and conceive of nature. We will examine these issues in various global settings to explore how everyday politics shape politics of life in different locales.
Last offered: Spring 2018

ANTHRO 367B: The Intellectual and Political Career of Stuart Hall and British Cultural Studies from 1960 to 2014

The seminar traces the trajectory of Stuart Hall and British Cultural Studies, beginning with the first New Left in 1960; then the Birmingham Centre period, Thatcherism and Gramscian analysis; race, gender, and identity politics; global and diasporic approaches; New Times, neo-liberalism, and the problem of historicizing the present conjuncture. Case studies from other parts of the world will put cultural studies tools to the test.
Last offered: Autumn 2015

ANTHRO 368: Dynamics of Coupled Human-Natural Systems

This is a graduate research seminar on the interdisciplinary approach to the study of the dynamics of what is known as ¿coupled human-natural systems.¿ We will take a critical perspective on such systems, asking to what extent the idea of coupling of discrete subsystems is intellectually profitable and what defines a ¿human¿ vs. a ¿natural¿ system? We will explore concepts such as coupling, nonlinearity, threshold behavior, feedback, complexity, resilience, and catastrophes. Case studies will be drawn from the literature on human ecology, population dynamics, disease ecology, and social dynamics. Emphasis will be on developing a working knowledge of mathematical and computational models of coupled systems embedded within a rigorous empirical framework of biosocial data collection.
Last offered: Winter 2014
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