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91 - 100 of 462 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 113B: Religious Practices in Archaeological Cultures (ANTHRO 213B, ARCHLGY 113B)

According to Hawkes (1954), religion or ideology is the most difficult part of social life to access archaeologically. Luckily, not all scholars agree; according to Fogelin (2008) 'religion is not something people think about, but something people do¿. Thus, archaeology, an inherently multidisciplinary subject that studies material culture, is well suited to delve into religion and its underpinnings.nThis course will explore religious practices, as they can be defined and interpreted from archaeological contexts spanning the Paleolithic to historic periods. Definitions of religion differ from author to author but they mostly agree that religion is a fully integrated and thus integral part of human social life. Politics, economics, identity and social class influence religion, and religion influences how these forces play out in society. Thus, the course will also examine the significance of ritual and religion in a variety of social contexts.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2016 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 114: Prehistoric Stone Tools: Technology and Analysis (ANTHRO 214, ARCHLGY 114)

Archaeologists rely on an understanding of stone tools to trace much of what we know about prehistoric societies. How to make, illustrate, and analyze stone tools, revealing the method and theory intrinsic to these artifacts.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2016 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 114A: Introduction to South Asian Archaeolgy (ANTHRO 214A, ARCHLGY 114A)

This seminar will survey the archaeology of South Asia, beginning with animal and plant domestication in the early Holocene and ending with the late Medieval Period. Given its chronological breadth and spatial scope, the class will interrogate a variety of social and historical contexts that contribute to a broad range of anthropological research concerns¿including the intersections of authority, ritual, alterity and landscape¿and at the same time critically consider the epistemological bases for their analyses through archaeological remains.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2016 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 114B: Landscape Archaeology and Global Information Systematics (ANTHRO 214B)

This course is meant to lay groundwork for analysis of archaeological landscapes using the methods of GIS. Throughout, we consider the various understandings of landscape, from the biographical to the biological. The course explores the history of various typologies of landscape, incorporating the cultural, the topographical, the ecological, and the topological; reviews different types of landscape data and analysis, including aerial imagery, stratigraphic excavations, and specialized analyses; addresses how to integrate different sorts of data sets and carry out analytical assessment of interrelated "layers" as dynamic constituents of landscape; considers implications of landscape studies in modern policy and management. Students will create interpretive frameworks for a public audience as a component of the final project.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2014 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 115: The Social life of Human Bones (ANTHRO 215, ARCHLGY 115)

Skeletal remains serve a primary function of support and protection for the human body. However, beyond this, they have played a range of social roles once an individual is deceased. The processes associated with excarnation, interment, exhumation and reburial all speak to the place that the body, and its parts, play in our cultural as well as physical landscape.n This course builds on introductory courses in human skeletal anatomy by adding the social dynamics that govern the way humans treat other humans once they have died. It draws on anthropological, biological and archaeological research, with case studies spanning a broad chronological and spatial framework to provide students with an overview of social practice as it relates to the human body.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 115B: Peoples and Cultures of Ancient Mesoamerica (ANTHRO 215B)

This course engages with the world of ancient Mesoamerica, focusing on the Mixtec, Aztec, Maya, Zapotec, Chichimec, Olmec, and Teotihuacan peoples. We address how questions about the past are framed through ethnographic and ethnohistoric accounts of daily life, how diverse scientific methods and theoretical perspectives are used to address these questions, how interpretations of daily life in the ancient Mesoamerican world are formulated, and how these interpretations are marshaled in contemporary politics and policies. We explore different scales of Mesoamerican communities, and compare the diverse material culture and lifeways represented in Mesoamerica at different time periods. Students will create interpretive frameworks for a public audience as a component of the final project.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2014 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 116: Data Analysis for Quantitative Research (ANTHRO 216)

An introduction to numeric methods in Anthropology and related fields employing the Data Desk statistics package to test hypotheses and to explore data. Examples chosen from the instructor¿s research and other relevant projects. No statistical background is necessary, but a working knowledge of algebra is important. Topics covered include: Frequency Distributions; Measures of Central Tendency, Dispersion, and Variability; Probability and Probability Distributions; Statistical Inference, Comparisons of Sample Means and Standard Deviations; Analysis of Variance; Contingency Tables, Comparisons of Frequencies; Correlation and Regression; Principal Components Analysis; Discriminant Analysis; and Cluster Analysis. Grading based on take-home problem sets.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Klein, R. (PI)

ANTHRO 116B: Anthropology of the Environment (ANTHRO 216B)

This seminar interrogates the history of anthropology's approach to the environment, beginning with early functionalist, structuralist, and Marxist accounts of human-environment relationships. It builds towards more recent developments in the field, focusing on nonhuman and relational ontologies as well as current projects on the intersections of nature, capital, politics, and landscape histories. At the end of this class, students will be familiar with the intellectual histories of environmental anthropology and contemporary debates and tensions around questions of ethics, agency, environment, and historical causality.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 116C: Native Americans in the 21st Century: Encounters, Identity, and Sovereignty in Contemporary America (ANTHRO 16, ARCHLGY 16, NATIVEAM 16)

What does it mean to be a Native American in the 21st century? Beyond traditional portrayals of military conquests, cultural collapse, and assimilation, the relationships between Native Americans and American society. Focus is on three themes leading to in-class moot court trials: colonial encounters and colonizing discourses; frontiers and boundaries; and sovereignty of self and nation. Topics include gender in native communities, American Indian law, readings by native authors, and Indians in film and popular culture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Wilcox, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 117: Thinking Through Animals (ANTHRO 217)

The human-animal relationship is dynamic, all encompassing and durable. Without exception, all socio-cultural groups have evidenced complex interactions with the animals around them, both domesticated and wild. However, the individual circumstances of these interactions are hugely complicated, and involve much more than direct human-animal contact, going far beyond this to incorporate social, ecological and spiritual contexts. This course delves into this complexity, covering the gamut of social roles played by animals, as well as the methods and approaches to studying these, both traditional and scientific. While the notion of `animals as social actors¿ is well acknowledged, their use as proxies for human autecology (the relationship between a species and its environment) is also increasingly recognised as a viable mechanism for understanding our cultural and economic past. The module presents an overview covering a broad timespan from the Pleistocene to the modern day. It will piece together the breadth of human-animal relationships using a wide geographic range of case studies.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2014 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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