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221 - 230 of 462 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 180: Science, Technology, and Gender

Why is engineering often seen as a masculine profession? What have women's experiences been in entering fields of science and technology? How has gender been defined by scientists? Issues: the struggles of women in science to negotiate misogyny and cultural expectation (marriage, children), reproductive issues (surrogate motherhood, visual representations of the fetus, fetal surgery, breast feeding, childbirth practices), how the household became a site of consumerism and technology, and the cultural issues at stake as women join the ranks of scientists.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2009 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 180A: Sex and Power (FEMGEN 180A)

From hook-up culture to pornography and sex work and even Beyoncé's latest album, "Lemonade," our struggles with consent, betrayal, and violence evince collective confusions about the relationship between sex and power in our societies. A quick Google search for news articles on the topic reveals that we must communally brace ourselves, usually through a Public Service Announcement pun, Let's Talk About Sex, and then a warning, Talking about sex can be hard. Cultural and social analyses can help us un-brace ourselves and get closer to meaningfully, and respectfully, talking about how cultural difference and social hierarchies fuel, and our fueled by, ideologies about sex and sexuality. This course examines sex as a nexus of socio-cultural, economic, and political relations of power for individuals and groups across local and global and national and transnational boundaries. And because a lot of the difficulties in talking about sex entail difficulties about ¿seeing¿ sex, this class relies on visual culture and documentary filmmaking alongside ethnographies and theoretical scholarship.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 181A: Gender in the Middle East: Iran, Turkey, and Egypt (FEMGEN 181A)

This course explores the construction of gender in the Middle East. Drawing on the historical, sociological and anthropological research in the region, the course aims to question the stereotypes about the subordination of Muslim women and to offer students a systematic reading and analytical discussion of the political, economic and cultural structures that inform gender relations and practices in the region. The course starts with an examination of early Islam and religious sources with regard to women¿s status, then moves on to nationalist and modernization movements in the 19th and 20th centuries, and finally explores women¿s and men¿s lives in contemporary Egypt, Turkey and Iran. In this framework, we will pay special attention to Islamist mobilizations, family and sexual relations, as well as women's changing livelihoods and labor.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2014 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 182: An Anthropology of Annihilation: Tobacco at the Turn of the Millennium

The cigarette as the world's greatest weapon of mass destruction: 100 million dead worldwide from cigarettes during the 20th century, one billion expected to die in the 21st century. How to understand this toll, its production, management, politicization, and depoliticization? What can anthropological and allied perspectives disclose? How does the catastrophe challenge key precepts within anthropology and other branches of the academy?
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2011 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 182A: Down and Out: Marginal Lives and Institutional Technologies (ANTHRO 282A)

This course examines the neglect and management of socially marginalized persons including the mentally ill, youth runaways, child wards of the state, drug addicts and prisoners. In this course, we will approach the concept of marginality by investigating the spaces and institutions of decay, neglect and rehabilitation to which unwanted and indigent individuals are relegated. Readings are focused on qualitative research conducted within institutions of health, welfare, and reform. There will be two comparative public mental health sections in this course: one focused on South Asia and the second on Africa. This course is relevant for students interested in medical anthropology, applied anthropology, public health policy, or clinical careers in medicine, psychology, or social work.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2013 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 182D: Knowledge and Violence in the Middle East (ANTHRO 282D, CSRE 182C, HISTORY 282D, HISTORY 382D, SOC 182H)

In this colloquium, we will think about the various ways in which knowledge shapes violence and violence shapes knowledge in the modern Middle East. Recent works in various subfield of Middle Eastern studies, including history, anthropology, sociology and science and technology studies address this topic from different disciplinary perspectives. We will investigate how violence has been harnessed, theorized and narrated in influential works in these subfields. The course focuses on a set of key themes and questions that have been central to such writings: the nature of violence and the question of accountability and responsibility, shifting technologies of warfare, including technologies of representation, and the aftermath of violence. The questions that drive this colloquium, include, how do we define violence? What is its role in shaping the history and historiography of the modern Middle East? What is the relationship between war and the production of knowledge about war?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Zakar, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 182N: Smoke and Mirrors in Global Health

A few years ago, health experts began calling out tobacco as engendering a global health crisis, categorizing the cigarette as the world's greatest weapon of mass destruction. A "global health crisis"? What merits that title if not tobacco use? A hundred million people were killed by tobacco in the 20th century, and ten times that number ¿ a billion people ¿ are predicted to die prematurely from exposure to cigarette smoke over the next hundred years. How has tobacconcome to be labeled a global health crisis over the last decade and what has been the political response? From whence does activism and ongoing complacency regarding tobacco arise? How are they created in different cultural contexts?nnThis course aims to provide students conceptual tools to tackle two specific thought projects: (1) to understand how institutional actors compete to define a situation in the world today as a problem of global health, and (2) to understand the sociocultural means by which something highly dangerous to health such as the cigarette is made both politically contentious and inert. On both fronts, special attention will be given to the ways global health activism and complacency unfold in the U.S. and China.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 183B: Human Mobility and Adaptability (ANTHRO 283B)

Mobility, whether in the form of seasonal or permanent migration, is an ancient practice necessary for many subsistence strategies, including hunting-and-gathering and pastoralism. Many new forms of mobility have emerged and now it is nearly impossible to consider a patch of human society that is not engaged in or directly impacted by habitual, patterned geographic mobility. Today, almost everywhere in the world, people can get farther, faster; urbanization, environmental degradation, and civil unrest are driving groups of people who do not have a cultural tradition of nomadic migration to adopt a mobile lifestyle¿sometimes permanently, sometimes temporarily¿in search of new economic or resource opportunities. In this seminar course, we will explore modern patterns of human mobility and migration as adaptive strategies for predictably and unpredictably changing environments. Using a framework of biological and cultural adaptation, we will discuss the major types of current human mobility (e.g. nomadism, immigration, migrant labor, displacement) and how they influence and are influenced by social systems, resource access, and health.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2016 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 184: Spirituality and Healing

The puzzle of symbolic healing. How have societies without the resources of modern medicine approached healing? Why do these rituals have common features around the world? Shamanism, spirit possession, prayer, and the role of placebos in modern biomedicine. Students do ethnographic work and practical explorations along with more traditional scholarly approaches to learning.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2013 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 185: Medical Anthropology of Contemporary Africa (ANTHRO 285)

In this course we will examine the place of Africa in global health discourses while reading in-depth histories and ethnographies of the varied causes and consequences of some of the most difficult problems facing African countries today. We will study the effects of colonialism and conflict on health, explore the military and humanitarian connections in the fight against HIV/AIDS, weigh the risks and benefits of population genetic studies on African populations, examine biomedical interventions on, and erasures of, local health problems, and query the role of violence, memory, insecurity, and power in daily life on the continent.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2014 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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