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201 - 210 of 232 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 367: The Anthropology of Science: Global Politics and Laboratory Life

Science and technology are important cultural products that often dramatically reorganize various aspects of human life. In this course we will explore how recent innovations in the life sciences and biomedicine may reconfigure crucial elements of social institutions, lend new structures to identity politics, and often change the way we interact with and conceive of nature. We will examine these issues in various global settings to explore how everyday politics shape politics of life in different locales.
Last offered: Spring 2018

ANTHRO 368A: Time and Temporality

This course explores the social and political organization of time. Anthropology has long been critical of the narratives of progress that are embedded in concepts of modern politics, such as development, citizenship, secularism, and sovereignty. How do social actors respond to the perceived failures of such narratives? How do they re-articulate historical pasts to political futures in the aftermath of modernization? In this course we will read studies that examine lived experiences of the passing of time. How is memory linked to anticipation? How is consciousness of the past structured by expectations of a future to come? We will pay particular attention to the material aspects of these temporal relations, including their social, economic, and infrastructural conditions. Drawing from current debates in anthropology, queer theory, and post-colonial studies, we will critically interrogate theories of ruination, crisis, hope, and utopia.
Last offered: Autumn 2019

ANTHRO 371: Living and Dying in the Contemporary World

This seminar explores how biological, political and social conditions transform and conjoin experiences of living and dying in the world today. Engaging contemporary ethnographies and social theory, we will examine how life and death, the natural and the social, the individual and the collective, are braided together in ways that challenge conclusions about what constitutes care, community, health, rights, and violence, among other issues. We will also reflect on whether and how the braiding together of these domains leaves room for the recognition of their singularity. Thus, an abiding question for this seminar is the relation of history to the present. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

ANTHRO 372: Urban Ecologies

At the intersections of urbanism and environmental studies, political ecology, postcolonial theory and the new materialism, new fields are in formation. This seminar explores scholarship that connects cities with countrysides rough questions of resources and infrastructures. We will consider questions id inequality access and community as well as unexpected urban ecologies
Last offered: Autumn 2017

ANTHRO 373: Things: An Archaeology of the Relationships Between Humans and Things

This course examines a variety of approaches that claim to explore the relationships between humans and things. Some of the approaches include Marx and material culture studies; Heidegger; cognitive and phenomenological; Actor Network Theory. But there is a need also to examine behavioral and ecological and Darwinian approaches. Many of these approaches do not adequately deal with the physicality of things as objects and there is a need to seek a way to incorporate such aspects of things into social theory. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

ANTHRO 374: Archaeology of Colonialism/Postcolonialisms

Advanced graduate seminar focused on the archaeology of colonial and postcolonial contexts, both prehistoric and historic. Emphasis on intersections between archaeological research and and subaltern, postcolonial, and transnational feminist/queer theory. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

ANTHRO 376: Archaeology: The Emergence of a Discipline

This course explores the key thinkers and practitioners who have founded the discipline of archaeology. Reaching back into the nineteenth century, the course examines in depth the key figures, their preoccupations and projects that shaped the way that archaeology grew through the 20th and into the 21st century. Global in scope, the emphasis will be on field projects and practical problems that stimulated the intellectual development of archaeology as an independent discipline closely tied to geology, history, anthropology, and the natural sciences. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Last offered: Winter 2018

ANTHRO 378: Dynamics of Coupled Human-Natural Systems

This is a graduate research seminar on the interdisciplinary approach to the study of the dynamics of what is known as "coupled human-natural systems." We will take a critical perspective on such systems, asking to what extent the idea of coupling of discrete subsystems is intellectually profitable and what defines a "human" vs. a "natural" system? We will explore concepts such as coupling, nonlinearity, threshold behavior, feedback, complexity, resilience, and catastrophes. Case studies will be drawn from the literature on human ecology, population dynamics, disease ecology, and social dynamics. Emphasis will be on developing a working knowledge of mathematical and computational models of coupled systems embedded within a rigorous empirical framework of biosocial data collection.

ANTHRO 378A: History of Vaccines

This graduate seminar will examine the history of vaccine development focusing on technical, political, zoonotic, and ethical issues. Readings will be drawn from history, anthropology, literature, and biology. Prerequisite: consent of instructor
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: Jain, S. (PI)

ANTHRO 378B: Culture, Mind and Emotion : Anthropological and Psychological Approaches

How does culture shape the experience of thinking and feeling, the way humans relate to the world and to others? This graduate level course, taught by a psychologist who studies emotion (Jeanne Tsai) and an anthropologist who studies mind (Tanya Marie Luhrmann), explores the way that living in social worlds deeply shapes what seem to be basic processes. We explore what we know about the cultural variations in emotional experience, and about the effect of different representations of minds. We also what can be learned about the way culture shapes experience through different methods.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 5 units total)
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