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181 - 190 of 472 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 153: Asylum: Knowledge, Politics, and Population

This course draws from ethnography, social theory, media and literature to examines the place of the asylum in the constitution of knowledge, politics, and populations. An ancient juridical concept, asylum has been used to describe a fundamental political right, medical and penal institutions, as well as emergent spaces of care and safety. As such, thus course invites students to think of critical issues associated with asylum, including: illness, trauma, violence, immigration, displacement, human rights, sanctuary, and testimony.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Garcia, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 153A: Population and social trends in Japan (ANTHRO 253A)

Anthropological theories and concepts as applied to Japan. Postwar demographic trends. Delayed marriage.  Declining nuclear family.  Re-structuring of education and workplace. Problems for the seniors.  Foreign laborers shaking fundamentals of Japan.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2013 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 154: Anthropology of Drugs: Experience, Capitalism, Modernity (ANTHRO 254B, CSRE 154)

This course examines the significant role ¿drugs¿ play in shaping expressions of the self and social life; in the management populations, and in the production of markets and inequality. It engages these themes through cultural representations of drugs and drug use, analyses of scientific discourse, and social theory. Topics include: the social construction of the licit and illicit; the shifting boundaries of deviance, disease and pleasure; and the relationship between local markets and global wars.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 154C: Animism, Gaia, and Alternative Approaches to the Environment (ANTHRO 254C, ARCHLGY 154, ARCHLGY 254, DLCL 254, REES 254)

Indigenous knowledges have been traditionally treated as a field of research for anthropologists and as mistaken epistemologies, i.e., un-scientific and irrational folklore. However, within the framework of environmental humanities, current interest in non-anthropocentric approaches and epistemic injustice, animism emerged as a critique of modern epistemology and an alternative to the Western worldview. Treating native thought as an equivalent to Western knowledge will be presented as a (potentially) decolonizing and liberating practice. This course may be of interest to anthropology, archaeology and literature students working in the fields of ecocriticism and the environmental humanities/social sciences, students interested in the Anthropocene, geologic/mineral, bio-, eco- and geosocial collectives, symbiotic life-forms and non-human agencies. The course is designed as a research seminar for students interested in theory of the humanities and social sciences and simultaneously helping students to develop their individual projects and thesis.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2019 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 155: Research Methods in Ecological Anthropology (ANTHRO 255)

The course prepare students for the methodological and practical aspects of doing ecologically oriented, quantitative anthropological field research. The primary goal is to explore what it means to ask anthropological questions in a systematic way. We will focus on understanding what can constitute an interesting question, how to frame a question in way that facilitates investigation, and how to design methods to begin investigating a question. In turn, the course will provide a format to refine research projects in preparation for doing more extensive fieldwork.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2015 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 156: Japanese Anthropology (ANTHRO 256)

This is an advanced reading seminar in the field of Japanses Anthropology. nIt will explore the historical development of the field and the contemporary issues and topics taken up by scholars of Japanese anthropology. Prior knowledge of Japanese language, history, and, society is required.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2019 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 156B: Environment, Nature and Race (CSRE 156J)

Environment, nature and race: Politics of belonging, exclusion, and embodiment. Scientific and popular understandings of race and ethnicity remain deeply entangled with ideas about "nature" and the "environment". This course will introduce students to some of the many ways that nature, environment, and race have been and remain intertwined, for better or for worse. What does it mean to claim race is "natural"? To what extent is race shaped by environment and vice versa? How are the politics of race linked to the politics of environmentalism? The class will begin with a brief treatment of current critical consensus on the biology of race and the cultural politics of race and nature, and move on to a theoretical discussion of how humans and "nature" interact. From there, the course moves into historical and ethnographic examples of the politics of race and the environment: the racialized and racializing character of particular environments; the ways that racial politics shape natural environments; and the politics of exclusion and belonging in environmental movements. Case studies will be both rural and urban and draw from anthropology, geography, history, and biology. The course will end by considering the recent resurgence of the race concept in biology.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2015 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 157: Japanese Popular Culture (ANTHRO 257)

This seminar focuses on the intersection between politics and popular culture in contemporary Japan. It will survey a range of social and political implications of practices of popular culture. Topics include J-pop, manga, anime, and other popular visual cultures, as well as social media. Students will be introduced to theories of popular culture in general, and a variety of contemporary anthropological studies on Japanese popular culture in particular. Prior knowledge of cultural anthropology is required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Inoue, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 158: The Anthropology of Social Class (ANTHRO 258)

Course introduces social theory concepts and paradigms for the understanding of class. It then extends and revises those concepts and paradigms by considering anthropological approaches in different cultural and historical settings that consider the entanglements of class with other social hierarchies, especially race, caste, and ideas of "civilization" and "development".
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ferguson, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 159C: Ecological Humanities (ANTHRO 259C, DLCL 259C, REES 259C)

What sort of topics, research questions, approaches, theories and concepts lead to an integration of various kinds of knowledges? Ecological Humanities provides a conceptual platform for a merger of humanities and social sciences with earth and life sciences, soil science and forensic sciences. The course will discuss such selected topics as the Anthropocene, geologic/mineral and exhumed subjects/personae, bio- and geosocial collectives, symbiotic life-forms, non-human agencies, and forensic landscapes as examples of this merger.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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