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121 - 130 of 472 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 126: Urban Culture in Global Perspective (URBANST 114)

Core course for Urban Studies majors. We will study urban space both historically and cross-culturally. Urban Studies, by definition, is an interdisciplinary field, where the methodological approaches draw upon a diverse set of analytic tools. Disciplines that occupy a prominent place in this class are geography, cultural anthropology, sociology, history, media studies, and literature. In this context, we will discuss the importance of cities around the world to the economic, cultural, and political well-being of modern societies and examine how forces such as industrialization, decentralization, and globalization affect the structure and function of cities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hansen, T. (PI)

ANTHRO 126A: Politics of the Past (ANTHRO 226A, ARCHLGY 126A)

The past is never dead, William Faulkner once wrote. It's not even past. This seminar explores the contested meanings of history in the political present. It particularly focuses on how archaeological work and heritage becomes entangled in larger questions of identity, belonging, belief, economics, and the stories we tell about ourselves. Students will gain an expansive and in-depth perspective on why humans so value what has come before us, and why making meaning from the past is a process suffused with power.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 127: City and Sounds

How do people experience modern cities and urban public cultures through auditory channels? How does sound mediate and constitute urban space? How to listen to and write about culture through sound. Students carry out narrative interviews and sound fieldwork in the Bay Area. Readings include urban anthropology, semiotics, art history, social studies of science and technology, media studies, and musicology.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 127A: Cities and the Future: Utopias, Dystopias, and Other Urbanisms to Come

What sort of futures are being imagined for the cities of the twenty-first century? An interdisciplinary seminar, this course will critically analyze how the future of cities, and the cities of the future, are being thought about and acted upon in the present. It is designed for graduate students and advanced undergraduates with experience in the social sciences and humanities and who also have a keen interest in urban studies. Its primary objective is to develop sophisticated ways of thinking about the future of cities, since doing so has real significance for the kind of city we want to, and eventually will, ourselves inhabit.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 127C: Anthropology of Sport and the Body

This course will use the work of anthropology and critical studies to analyze modern sport and how it shapes the body. We will begin by looking at various ways in which theorists have proposed studying sport, and then use these theoretical frameworks to examine contemporary sport, from individual practice to global spectacle. We will look too at how sport has historically been used as a technique of both control and resistance. We will read several anthropologists work on sport across the world. We will conclude the course with a sustained discussion of the Olympic Games, using the tools we have studied to think through this massive spectacle of global import. nThis course is ideally suited for anyone interested in how sport can be examined as a form of culture and social exchange and, more broadly, how theory can be used to break open contemporary culture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 127D: HERITAGE POLITICS (ARCHLGY 127, ARCHLGY 227)

Heritage is a matter of the heart and not the brain, David Lowenthal once said. It does not seek to explore the past, but to domesticate it and enlist it for present causes. From the drafting of the first royal decrees on ancient monuments in the 17th century, political interests have had a hand in deciding which traditions, monuments and sites best represent and best serve the needs of the nation. The sum of these domestication efforts, the laws, institutions and practices established to protect and manage heritage, is what we call heritage governance. In this seminar you will learn about the politics of 21st century heritage governance at national and international level. Students will become familiar with key conventions and learn about the functioning of heritage institutions. We will also examine the hidden practices and current political developments that impact heritage governance: how UNESCO heritage sites become bargaining tools in international relations, how EU heritage policies are negotiated in the corridors of Brussels, and how the current re-nationalization of Western politics can affect what we come to know as our common past.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2019 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 128: Visual Studies

Drawing on anthropology, art history, cultural studies, and other fields, this course explores how and why one might want to think critically about the politics of visuality, social imagination, the politics of making and consuming images and things, iconophonia and iconophilia, the classification of people and things into ¿artists¿ and ¿art¿, and cultural production more generally.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 128A: The Boundaries of Humanity: Humans, Animals and Machines in the Age of Biotechnology

Advances in research and technology are blurring the boundaries between humans, animals, and machines, challenging conventional notions of human nature. Seminar explores the question of what it now means to be human and the personal, social, and ethical implications of our advancing technologies through the lens of various disciplines, including anthropology, cognitive psychology, neuroscience, genetics, evolutionary biology, biotechnology, and artificial intelligence. Includes guest speakers from fields and industries where important questions are being raised.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2016 | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 130A: Interpreting Space and Place: An Introduction to Mapmaking

How mapmaking, geographical information systems (GIS), and spatial tools can be applied in social research. Qualitative and quantitative approaches in the use of geospatial information. Methodologies and case examples.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 130B: Introduction to GIS in Anthropology (ANTHRO 230B)

How GIS and spatial tools can be applied in social research. Case studies and student projects address questions of social and cultural relevance using real data sets, including the collection of geospatial data and building of spatial evidence. Analytical approaches and how they can shape a social and cultural interpretation of space and place.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2013 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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