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81 - 90 of 238 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 140C: Mobilizing Nature

From Brazil's Landless Worker's Movement (MST) to Water Wars of Cochabamba to Standing Rock, these moments of protest have turned into movements. This seminar will examine how theoretical framings of movements have shifted from claims about political rights to environmental ones. We will address two overarching questions: How are notions of ethnicity, gender, and class constructed in relation to the environment? And how do people understand these relationships in such a way that motivates them to mobilize? Students will explore what kinds of ecological claims are being made, who is making, how, and who benefits from them. The objective is to ultimately understand how movements not only reflect, but also (re)shape political and social practices around the environment.
Last offered: Autumn 2017

ANTHRO 142B: Anthropology of the Internet

This course provides students with an introduction to anthropological approaches to the Internet as an object, and site, of study. Special attention is paid to the ways in which online media are changing the practices and materiality of politics. By reading recently published ethnographic analyses alongside classic anthropological and social theory texts students will come to a better understanding of the co-constitution of the Internet and contemporary social and political life.nnThough many Internet phenomena and websites are celebrated and discussed for their novelty, the questions and issues they present resonate with topics of longstanding anthropological concern. Each week of the course will be dedicated to bringing established anthropological frameworks to bear on a different aspect of the sociality and materiality of the net. How, for example, can anthropological theorizations of citizenship and publics help us make sense of ¿fake news¿ and ¿Twitter revolutions¿? How can Anderson¿s work on the role of the printing press in the emergence of the nation help us understand the ways in which blogs and online discussion boards facilitate transnational ¿imagined communities¿?

ANTHRO 143: Title Social Change in Contemporary China: Modernity and the Middle Kingdom (ANTHRO 243)

Over the last twenty years, residents of the People¿s Republic of China have experienced dramatic changes in nearly every facet of life. This undergraduate seminar introduces students to contemporary China through an examination of various types of social transformation. We will analyze how PRC residents of different backgrounds are confronting such processes as economic liberalization, migration, kinship transformation, sexual commodification, media proliferation, industrialization, and transnationalism? Priority is placed on reading, discussing and assessing research that uses qualitative methods and that situates political economy in dialogue with lived experience.
| UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 144: Art and the Repair of the Self (ANTHRO 244)

Engaging the body/mind and its senses in the making of images and things has long been considered to have potentially great therapeutic significance. This course is a close examination of making as a form of therapy, as a form of communication, and, vitally, as a form of knowing. As such, it suggests new, analytically powerful possibilities for anthropological practice.
Last offered: Spring 2019

ANTHRO 147B: World Heritage in Global Conflict (ANTHRO 247B, ARCHLGY 147B)

Heritage is always political, it is typically said. Such a statement might refer to the everyday politics of local stakeholder interests on one end of the spectrum, or the volatile politics of destruction and erasure of heritage during conflict, on the other. If heritage is always political then one might expect that the workings of World Heritage might be especially fraught given the international dimension. In particular, the intergovernmental system of UNESCO World Heritage must navigate the inherent tension between state sovereignty and nationalist interests and the wider concerns of a universal regime. The World Heritage List has over 1000 properties has many such contentious examples, including sites in Iraq, Mali, Syria, Crimea, Palestine and Cambodia. As an organization UNESCO was born of war with an explicit mission to end global conflict and help the world rebuild materially and morally, but has found it¿s own history increasingly entwined with that of international politics and violence.
Last offered: Winter 2018

ANTHRO 148: Health, Politics, and Culture of Modern China (ANTHRO 248, CHINA 155A, CHINA 255A)

One of the most generative regions for medical anthropology inquiry in recent years has been Asia. This seminar is designed to introduce upper division undergraduates and graduate students to the methodological hurdles, representational challenges, and intellectual rewards of investigating the intersections of health, politics, and culture in contemporary China.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 150: The Ordinary: The History of a Concept (ANTHRO 250)

The ordinary has today acquired something like a cultic status in contemporary culture. `Ordinary¿ citizens are the touchstone and essence of political democracy; the holy grail of effective marketing, the byword for earthy ethical judgment. In social science, the ordinary has blended in with the `normal¿ and the statistical mean. In Anthropology, ordinary life has all but replaced `cultural practice¿ as the epistemic gold standard of evidence. But this was not always so, and the ordinary has many, varied and contradictory meanings across the world.nThis course will (a) trace the historical emergence of the ordinary as a central ideological and metaphysical concept in modern thought and practice; (b) trace how the ordinary and the everyday have acquired unprecedented authority in anthropology; (3) trace the varies meanings and connotations of `the ordinary¿ in different socio-historical contexts from Asia, Africa and Euro-America.nThe literature will consist of ethnographies, and works of philosophical and historical scholarship.

ANTHRO 150B: Fire: Social and Ecological Contexts of Conflagration (EARTHSYS 150B)

Over 1 million acres burned from California wildland fires in 2018, yet conservative estimates suggest that four times as many acres burned annually in California preceding European colonialism. In this course we will explore how climate, land management, urban development, and human social institutions contribute to contrasts in wild and prescribed (intentional anthropogenic) fire patterns worldwide. We will investigate the socio-ecological values and harms associated with different fire and land-use policies and practices, ranging from Indigenous and small-scale contexts, conservation projects, and large-scale fire suppression efforts.
Last offered: Autumn 2019

ANTHRO 151D: Art/Design/Craft

Key texts from art theory, design theory, and recent work in craft theory will be set in conversation with anthropological understandings of cultural production and creative expression in order to explore why art, design, and craft have so long been differently valued. Examines why ¿art¿ is associated with ¿vision¿, intellect, and creative expression, while ¿craft¿ is associated with ¿mere¿ skill, manual labor, and domesticity. Contemporary social and political implications are explored.
Last offered: Winter 2020

ANTHRO 152A: Urban Poverty and Inequality in Contemporary China

Experiences of poverty and inequality and their relationship to gender, space development, post-socialism, and globalization. How processes of class-making in China's cities are bound up with transformations in the country's sociopolitcal landscape.
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