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201 - 210 of 462 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 167A: A Wilderness Empire: The Political Ecology of California

This course traverses the historical and geographic space of California to explore the intersection of nature, economy and politics in the making of the contemporary American West. The course links popular historical accounts of the state to related core theoretical literature from anthropology, preparing students to use the analytic tools of anthropology to pursue questions about the people, processes and landscapes that are part of our taken for granted lived experience in California. The class draws theoretically from cultural anthropology, ecological anthropology, cultural and economic geography, and literature to develop a holistic understanding of the historical and social co-production of nature and economy in California and the American West.
Last offered: Winter 2014

ANTHRO 167B: Networks in Anthropology

¿Social network¿ may now be a household term but network concepts long predate the internet age. In fact, networks are an important part of some of the earliest (and most enduring) theoretical ideas in anthropology and sociology. Starting from the premise that relationships between individuals provide the raw material for the emergence of social structure, this course focuses on how network analysis can be used to examine and explain both system-level patterning and outcomes for individuals. In addition to the theoretical foundations of social network analysis, students will learn basic techniques for collecting, analyzing, and visualizing network data, through workshops in class and hands-on assignments. We will also explore contemporary applications of network analysis in economic anthropology, kinship studies, human evolutionary studies, and epidemiology, among other topics. Prerequisite: None. Students will be expected to learn some mathematical concepts.
Last offered: Winter 2016

ANTHRO 168: Everest: Extreme Anthropology

Using Mt. Everest as a touch point, this class will examine the anthropology of nature, specifically focusing on exploration and adventure travel.
Last offered: Spring 2014

ANTHRO 168A: Risky Environments: The Nature of Disaster (ANTHRO 268A)

This seminar explores topics including environmental movements and countercultures, human agency and geoengineering ecotourism, and indigenous perspectives of changing climates to query how humans view `nature¿ in terms of stability, instability, risk and disaster in the 21st century. Case studies draw upon a broad range of geographical regions including the Arctic, Iceland, Australia, and the Americas. Discussions will draw upon film portrayals and interviews with researchers in addition to readings.
Last offered: Winter 2011

ANTHRO 169: The Ecology of Cuisine: Food, Nutrition, and the Evolution of the Human Diet (ANTHRO 269)

This course is an interdisciplinary approach to understanding human food consumption and nutrition, incorporating biological, evolutionary, ecological and social perspectives. Topics include a broad survey of primate diets and their physiological and behavioral correlates; fossil and archaeological evidence for early human diets; adaptations to dietary shifts since the Neolithic; infant and early child feeding practices and their role in shaping human social arrangements, metabolic syndrome, food security, food taboos; the origins of spices; cultural diversity in the social uses and meanings of food and the sharing of food; gathering, hunting and locavorism as high hipster cuisine. Emphasis is on understanding the diversity of human foodways through time and space: how biology, culture, and ecology interact to shape the food we eat, and how the food we eat shapes us.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, WAY-SMA

ANTHRO 169A: New Citizenship: Grassroots Movements for Social Justice in the U.S. (CHILATST 168, CSRE 168, FEMGEN 140H)

Focus is on the contributions of immigrants and communities of color to the meaning of citizenship in the U.S. Citizenship, more than only a legal status, is a dynamic cultural field in which people claim equal rights while demanding respect for differences. Academic studies of citizenship examined in dialogue with the theory and practice of activists and movements. Engagement with immigrant organizing and community-based research is a central emphasis.
Last offered: Winter 2014

ANTHRO 170: Australian Ecosystems: Human Dimensions and Environmental Dynamics (ANTHRO 270, EARTHSYS 172)

This cross-disciplinary course surveys the history and prehistory of human ecological dynamics in Australia, drawing on geology, climatology, archaeology, geography, ecology and anthropology to understand the mutual dynamic relationships between the continent and its inhabitants. Topics include anthropogenic fire and fire ecology, animal extinctions, aridity and climate variability, colonization and spread of Homo sapiens, invasive species interactions, changes in human subsistence and mobility throughout the Pleistocene and Holocene as read through the archaeological record, the totemic geography and social organization of Aboriginal people at the time of European contact, the ecological and geographical aspects of the "Dreamtime", and contemporary issues of policy relative to Aboriginal land tenure and management.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

ANTHRO 170A: Multispecies Ethnography: Human, Animal, Plant, Mineral, and Microbe (ANTHRO 270A)

This course explores new modes of writing and researching in anthropology. Multispecies ethnography considers nonhuman life as objects of analysis¿animals, plants, fungi, bacteria, and viruses¿as having political lives and import. By studying how these nonhuman entities, including metals, interact with and shape human existence, multispecies ethnographers who study ¿life¿ ¿ from the human down to the microbe, must engage in multiple worlds: from the jungle to the laboratory, from the field to the desk. This course will incorporate readings on ¿zoe¿ and ¿bios¿, the making of species categories, relationships between the human and nonhuman, current debates on breaking with the species concept and ¿the rights of mother earth.¿ We will read the conceptual works in conjunction with current multispecies ethnographies to give grounding to the theory.
Last offered: Winter 2016

ANTHRO 171: The Biology and Evolution of Language (ANTHRO 271, HUMBIO 145L)

Lecture course surveying the biology, linguistic functions, and evolution of the organs of speech and speech centers in the brain, language in animals and humans, the evolution of language itself, and the roles of innateness vs. culture in language. Suitable both for general education and as preparation for further studies in anthropology, biology, linguistics, medicine, psychology, and speech & language therapy. Anthropology concentration: CS, EE. No prerequisites.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

ANTHRO 171A: Linguistic Field Methods

Workshop applying methods for gathering and analyzing linguistic data in the field, i.e., from consultants who are native speakers of a language essentially unknown to the investigator. Principles of language documentation. Students will do local field projects and work on these both in and out of class. Format involves lectures, discussion, working with native speakers, and student presentations. Topics include: choosing a language; planning the project; computerized collection, storage, and analysis of linguistic data; field recording equipment; interviews and elicitation; diagnostic vocabulary lists and grammatical schedules; field study of everyday communication and discourse; area surveys and the ethnography of communication; ethics, reflexivity, and bias; working with human subjects and governments. Prerequisite: a course in linguistics or in anthropological field methods.
Last offered: Spring 2015
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