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121 - 130 of 462 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 124N: Maya Mythology and the Popol Vuh

Shortly after the Spanish conquest of Highland Guatemala, an anonymous Quiché Mayan noble translated a sacred text of his people, Popol Vuh (¿Council Book¿), and committed the Mayan to Spanish letters. His book, with its account of creations and destructions of the world by the gods, the descent of the Hero Twins into the Underworld and their ball games with its lords, and a history of the ruling clan of the Quiché state, is a grand apology for the values and world of the Quiché Maya, but it is no drab political treatise. It relates the daily life of the Quiché to their natural world (including the skies) and to the underworld journey that they expected in death, and is a compilation crafted to instruct and entertain at several levels of interpretation, from those of sophisticated scholars to children.n In the 1970¿s, we began to realize that many of the ceramic vessels unearthed from the tombs of the Classic Lowland Maya, originally intended to accompany their owners on their perilous journey through the underworld, actually illustrate scenes described in Popol Vuh. More recently, it has been possible to relate the mythology to texts newly deciphered from Mayan inscriptions as well as vases. The Popol Vuh has thus been shown to be a survival of a much older and more widespread culture. Like most survivals, though, it had been re-crafted in the image of the contemporary Quiché culture. When are mythological similarities sufficient to imply relatedness of the stories through common descent? How can mythical similarities imply universals of mind and culture? How have myths been used as state political instruments?n This is an exciting combination of archaeology, linguistics, cultural anthropology, art, and literature. Students will analyze the text critically, examine Mayan art, and help develop a web site. No prerequisites.
Last offered: Winter 2015

ANTHRO 125: Language and the Environment (ANTHRO 225)

Lecture course on vocabulary and grammar as keys to peoples¿ understanding and use of the environment. Ethnobotany, ethnobiology, and ethnosemantics in the analysis of the language of place, plants and animals, the earth, the body, and disease. Terminological gaps and gluts and what they imply. Language as a strategic resource in environmental management. Language contact and conflict in the modern global environment, with particular attention to the vocabularies of capitalism and property. Language extinction and its environmental implications. Anthropology concentration: CS, EE. No prerequisites.
Last offered: Autumn 2015

ANTHRO 125A: International Criminal Courts and the Question of Global Justice

What are the cultural, legal and political implications of the global extrapolation of our understanding of the rule of law, in general, and criminal law, in particular? This course will look at the theory and practice of the new international criminal courts, the criminalization and individualization (or humanization) of international law, and the broader system of cosmopolitan order that it presupposes, with special reference to how it differs from earlier projects for international order (international law, war crimes, human rights, and the UN system). Case studies will follow the historical development of the key institutions, individuals and legal precedents that have been determinative for the new international criminal jurisdiction, including Nuremberg and Tokyo, the ad hoc (Yugoslavia, Rwanda) and hybrid tribunals (Liberia, Sierra Leone, Lebanon, Cambodia) and now the International Criminal Court (DRC, northern Uganda, Sudan, Libya and Kenya).nn
Last offered: Winter 2014

ANTHRO 125S: International Criminal Courts and the Question of Global Justice

What are the cultural, legal and political implications of the globalization of our understanding of the rule of law, in general, and criminal law, in particular? This course will look at the theory and practice of the new international criminal courts, the criminalization and individualization (or humanization) of international law, and the broader system of cosmopolitan order that it presupposes, with special reference to how it differs from earlier projects for international order (international law, war crimes, human rights, and the UN system). Case studies will follow the historical development of the key institutions, individuals and legal precedents that have been determinative for the new international criminal jurisdiction, including Nuremberg and Tokyo, the ad hoc (Yugoslavia, Rwanda) and hybrid tribunals (Liberia, Sierra Leone, Lebanon Cambodia) and now the International Criminal Court (DRC, northern Uganda, Sudan, Libya and Kenya).
Last offered: Summer 2014

ANTHRO 126: Urban Culture in Global Perspective (URBANST 114)

Core course for Urban Studies majors. We will study urban space both historically and cross-culturally. Urban Studies, by definition, is an interdisciplinary field, where the methodological approaches draw upon a diverse set of analytic tools. Disciplines that occupy a prominent place in this class are geography, cultural anthropology, sociology, history, media studies, and literature. In this context, we will discuss the importance of cities around the world to the economic, cultural, and political well-being of modern societies and examine how forces such as industrialization, decentralization, and globalization affect the structure and function of cities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 126A: Politics of the Past (ANTHRO 226A, ARCHLGY 126A)

The past is never dead, William Faulkner once wrote. It's not even past. This seminar explores the contested meanings of history in the political present. It particularly focuses on how archaeological work and heritage becomes entangled in larger questions of identity, belonging, belief, economics, and the stories we tell about ourselves. Students will gain an expansive and in-depth perspective on why humans so value what has come before us, and why making meaning from the past is a process suffused with power.
Last offered: Spring 2017

ANTHRO 127: City and Sounds

How do people experience modern cities and urban public cultures through auditory channels? How does sound mediate and constitute urban space? How to listen to and write about culture through sound. Students carry out narrative interviews and sound fieldwork in the Bay Area. Readings include urban anthropology, semiotics, art history, social studies of science and technology, media studies, and musicology.

ANTHRO 127A: Cities and the Future: Utopias, Dystopias, and Other Urbanisms to Come

What sort of futures are being imagined for the cities of the twenty-first century? An interdisciplinary seminar, this course will critically analyze how the future of cities, and the cities of the future, are being thought about and acted upon in the present. It is designed for graduate students and advanced undergraduates with experience in the social sciences and humanities and who also have a keen interest in urban studies. Its primary objective is to develop sophisticated ways of thinking about the future of cities, since doing so has real significance for the kind of city we want to, and eventually will, ourselves inhabit.

ANTHRO 127D: HERITAGE POLITICS (ARCHLGY 127, ARCHLGY 227)

Heritage is a matter of the heart and not the brain, David Lowenthal once said. It does not seek to explore the past, but to domesticate it and enlist it for present causes. From the drafting of the first royal decrees on ancient monuments in the 17th century, political interests have had a hand in deciding which traditions, monuments and sites best represent and best serve the needs of the nation. The sum of these domestication efforts, the laws, institutions and practices established to protect and manage heritage, is what we call heritage governance. In this seminar you will learn about the politics of 21st century heritage governance at national and international level. Students will become familiar with key conventions and learn about the functioning of heritage institutions. We will also examine the hidden practices and current political developments that impact heritage governance: how UNESCO heritage sites become bargaining tools in international relations, how EU heritage policies are negotiated in the corridors of Brussels, and how the current re-nationalization of Western politics can affect what we come to know as our common past.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 128: Visual Studies

Drawing on anthropology, art history, cultural studies, and other fields, this course explores how and why one might want to think critically about the politics of visuality, social imagination, the politics of making and consuming images and things, iconophonia and iconophilia, the classification of people and things into ¿artists¿ and ¿art¿, and cultural production more generally.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II
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