2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

391 - 400 of 408 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 388: Anthropology of the Extraordinary: Ontologies and Phenomenologies

In the last few years anthropology has taken what has come to be called an ¿ontological turn¿ in which the ways an object or experience is felt to be real is explored from different perspectives. Often this involves exploring phenomena (like ghosts, talking trees and humans who become jaguars) which could be called ¿extraordinary¿ and which challenge secular, western expectations of what is real. There has also been a ¿phenomenological turn¿ in which anthropologists have become interested in classifying and categorizing human experience in particular detail. The class will explore the scholarship in this area. Readings will include an introduction to classic philosophical writing (William James, Karl Jaspers, Martin Heidegger) and more recent work such as David Hufford, The Terror that Comes in the Night; Eduardo Kohn How Forests Think; Morton Pederson Not Quite Shamans; Ann Taves Religious Experience Reconsidered; Annemarie Mol, The Body Multiple; Roger Lohmann Dream Travelers, and others.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2015 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 389: Ethnographic Writing and Beyond

In this class we analyze anthropological writing that has examined and pushed the bounds of the discipline. We will focus on how writing itself is a practice in anthropology, and how styles of writing impact argument, affect, and ultimately, the discipline itself. Students will also work in different genres of writing to better understand writing as a craft, a discipline, and a means of communication.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2015 | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 390: Psychological Anthropology

Introduction to psychological anthropology as a subfield. We read through ethnographies on the anthropology of childhood, of emotion, of human relationship and of cognition, drawing analytic tools not only from anthropology but also from psychoanalysis, developmental psychology, and cognitive science. We will read some earlier classic work but focus on more contemporary theory. Prerequisite, by instructor consent.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2016 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 391: Subjectivity

This seminar considers subjectivity as a central category of social, cultural, psychological, historical and political analysis. Through a critical and collaborative examination of ethnographic works and psychoanalytic theory, we will identify the processes by which subjectivities are produced, explore subjectivity as a locus of social change, and examine how emerging subjectivities remake social worlds. Some of the questions this seminar will pose include: what is the relation between subjectivity and subjection? How to account for the effects of the social in terms of subject formation without succumbing to social determinism? What else is the subject other than the outcome of a complex constellation of discursive, material, institutional, and historical factors?
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Garcia, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 398B: Race, Ethnicity, and Language: Writing Race, Ethnicity, and Language in Ethnography (EDUC 389B, LINGUIST 254)

This methods seminar focuses on developing ethnographic strategies for representing race, ethnicity, and language in writing without reproducing the stereotypes surrounding these categories and practices. In addition to reading various ethnographies, students conduct their own ethnographic research to test out the authors' contrasting approaches to data collection, analysis, and representation. The goal is for students to develop a rich ethnographic toolkit that will allow them to effectively represent the (re)production and (trans)formation of racial, ethnic, and linguistic phenomena.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 400: Cultural and Social Dissertation Writers Seminar

Required of fifth-year Ph.D. students returning from dissertation field research and in the process of writing dissertations and preparing for professional employment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 401A: Qualifying Examination: Topic

Required of second- and third-year Ph.D. students writing the qualifying paper or the qualifying written examination. May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ANTHRO 401B: Qualifying Examination: Area

Required of second- and third-year Ph.D. students writing the qualifying paper or the qualifying written examination. May be repeated for credit one time.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ANTHRO 440: Teaching Assistantship

Supervised experience as assistant in one undergraduate course.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 441: Master's Research Thesis

Supervised work for terminal and coterminal master's students writing the master's project in the final quarter of the degree program.
Terms: Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints