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331 - 340 of 408 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 335A: Animism and Alter-Native Modernities (FRENCH 335A, REES 335A)

For many years indigenous knowledges were treated as a field of research for anthropologists and as "mistaken epistemologies," i. e., unscientific and irrational folklore and childish worldviews. This old view of animism was a product of the evolutionist and anthropocentric worldview of the Enlightenment. However within the framework of ecological humanities, current interest in posthumanism, postsecularism and discussions on building altermodernity (Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri), indigenous thought is used to critique modern epistemology and develop an alternative to the Western worldview. Treating native thought as an equivalent to Western knowledge is presented as a decolonizing and liberating practice. The term alter-native modernities as response to the challenges of Euromodernity and suggests modernities that might emerge out of indigenous ways of being in the world. Comparison between literature on indigenous cultures from Latin America and from Russia (animism in Amazonia an more »
For many years indigenous knowledges were treated as a field of research for anthropologists and as "mistaken epistemologies," i. e., unscientific and irrational folklore and childish worldviews. This old view of animism was a product of the evolutionist and anthropocentric worldview of the Enlightenment. However within the framework of ecological humanities, current interest in posthumanism, postsecularism and discussions on building altermodernity (Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri), indigenous thought is used to critique modern epistemology and develop an alternative to the Western worldview. Treating native thought as an equivalent to Western knowledge is presented as a decolonizing and liberating practice. The term alter-native modernities as response to the challenges of Euromodernity and suggests modernities that might emerge out of indigenous ways of being in the world. Comparison between literature on indigenous cultures from Latin America and from Russia (animism in Amazonia and Siberia). Following recent works by anthropologists and archaeologists such as Nurit Bird-Rose, Philippe Descola, Graham Harvey, Tim Ingold and Viveiros de Castro, new animism is treated as an alternative (relational) ontology that allows rethinking the problem of matter and agency, goes beyond human exeptionalism and embraces non-humans. Topics include: alternative and alter-native modernities; Jean Piaget's theory of childhood animism; problem of anthropomorphism and personification; indigenous knowledge and the problem of epistemic violence; vitalist materialism (Jane Bennett, Rosi Braidotti); connectedness as the principle of life (relational epistemologies and ontologies); non-human agency (Bruno Latour).
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2015 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 337: The Politics of Humanitarianism

What does it mean to want to help, to organize humanitarian aid, in times of crisis? At first glance, the impulse to help issui generis a good one. Helping is surely preferable to indifference and inaction. This does not mean that humanitarian interventions entail no ethical or political stakes or that they are beyond engaged critique. We need to critique precisely that which we value, and to ask some hard questions, among them these: What are the differences among humanitarianism, charity, and philanthropy? What of social obligations and solidarities? How does the neoliberal world order currently create structural inequalities that ensure the reproduction of poverty and violence? How does the current order of things resemble or differ from the colonial world order? This course examines the history of humanitarian sensibilities and the emergence of organized action in the cause of humanity. In the early years of humanitarian intervention, political neutrality was a key principle; it ha more »
What does it mean to want to help, to organize humanitarian aid, in times of crisis? At first glance, the impulse to help issui generis a good one. Helping is surely preferable to indifference and inaction. This does not mean that humanitarian interventions entail no ethical or political stakes or that they are beyond engaged critique. We need to critique precisely that which we value, and to ask some hard questions, among them these: What are the differences among humanitarianism, charity, and philanthropy? What of social obligations and solidarities? How does the neoliberal world order currently create structural inequalities that ensure the reproduction of poverty and violence? How does the current order of things resemble or differ from the colonial world order? This course examines the history of humanitarian sensibilities and the emergence of organized action in the cause of humanity. In the early years of humanitarian intervention, political neutrality was a key principle; it has now come under ever greater analytical and political scrutiny. We will examine the reasons for the politicization and militarization of aid -- be it humanitarian aid in natural disasters or political crises; development programs in the impoverished south (¿the Third World¿), or peace-keeping. We will end with a critical exploration of the concept of human rights, humanity, and personhood. The overall methodological aim of the course is to demonstrate what insights an ethnographic approach to the politics, ethics, and aesthetics of humanitarianism can offer. Prerequisite, by instructor consent.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2016 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 337B: Anthropological Approaches to Health Issues in Contemporary Latin America

The purpose of this course is to examine the anthropological and ethnographic research on emerging health issues and sufferings in Latin America. In particular, the class explores how anthropologists understand and ponder social, economic, political, environmental, spatial processes that shape patterns of health, suffering and death, and the strategies to address them. By analyzing paradigmatic case studies, we will discuss theoretical concepts and social perspectives, as well as ethnographic dilemmas and methods.nnTaking a critical perspective, this class will not only explore the standard topics on Latin American health (hunger, infectious disease, mental health, etc.). We will also focus on emerging sufferings (drug use, epidemics, environmental discomforts and sufferings, etc.). Both standard and emerging topics are examined with respect to the changes in political economy, medical institutions and policy approaches, models of care and caregiving, gender violence, circulation and a more »
The purpose of this course is to examine the anthropological and ethnographic research on emerging health issues and sufferings in Latin America. In particular, the class explores how anthropologists understand and ponder social, economic, political, environmental, spatial processes that shape patterns of health, suffering and death, and the strategies to address them. By analyzing paradigmatic case studies, we will discuss theoretical concepts and social perspectives, as well as ethnographic dilemmas and methods.nnTaking a critical perspective, this class will not only explore the standard topics on Latin American health (hunger, infectious disease, mental health, etc.). We will also focus on emerging sufferings (drug use, epidemics, environmental discomforts and sufferings, etc.). Both standard and emerging topics are examined with respect to the changes in political economy, medical institutions and policy approaches, models of care and caregiving, gender violence, circulation and appropriation of expert knowledge, contamination, migration, spatial segregation, violence, marginalization, abandonment, justice and human rights.nnInterdisciplinary investigation is conducted into most of these health issues, not only in the global health field. They are addressed by the South American Social Medicine and Collective Health approaches. This class will include a description and critical analysis of their theoretical frameworks and core concepts, as well as their relationships to international and local medical anthropological theory and research.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2016 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 338B: History and Memory

How are history and memory important in the making of collective and public memory? This seminar draws together an interdisciplinary collection of readings with an aim to provide a foundation for seminar participants¿ projects, both historical and contemporary projects. We will explore critiques of the practice of gathering material, i.e., archival and oral histories as well as delve into experimental forms that combine improvisational approaches to history and critique in an effort to develop a methodological tool kit that allows for a push beyond established projects.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Ebron, P. (PI)

ANTHRO 339: Anthropology of Religion

This course presents classic and contemporary work on the anthropology of religion: Durkheim Elementary Forms of the Religious Life; Levy-Bruhl; Primitive Mentality; Douglas Purity and Danger; Evans Pritchard Nuer Religion; and recent ethnographies/scholarly work by Robbins, Keane, Keller, Boyer, Barrett, and others.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2010 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 339A: Technologies of Extinctions: Ecocides and Genocides (FRENCH 339A)

This course will explore the relationship between history, ecological evolution and mass killing in the age of humanly caused species extinction. It will explore the universalization of the notion of the Jewish Holocaust, its use to integrate into genocide studies the Native American "spiritual" holocaust, the Japanese nuclear holocaust and the Rwandan genocide, and the ethical dilemmas posed by the ideas of biotic, animal and ecological holocausts. Anthropology and history of genocides and extinctions as well as posthumanist, multispecies theories will provide theoretical frames for the course.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2014 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 340A: Post-secular Humanities: Religion and Spirituality in the Contemporary World (FRENCH 341A, REES 340A)

The term ¿postsecularism¿ refers to various theories and approaches regarding the revival of religion in the present, as well as current reevaluations of the relationship between faith and reason in knowledge building. When thinking about a postsecular humanities, the course would follow scholars that are usually associated with this trend (like Agamben, Badiou, Derrida, Habermas), on the one hand, and discuss Braidotti's ideas of a new vitalism, Chakrabarty's postcolonial postsecularism, and Harvey's new animism, on the other. The course will examine the way interactions and collisions among various worldviews can provoke the rethinking of key ideas of our times: what it means to be secular, religious, a citizen, a hybrid, an indigenous, a non-human.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2016 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 341: The Archaeololgy of Religious Crusading in Medieval Europe

This course will present a chronologically framed outlined of the three main regions that witnessed the greatest impact of the crusading period. Commencing with the initial capture of Jerusalem and the subsequent establishment of a crusader kingdom in the Middle East in AD1099, till its eventual end in 1291, this will be followed by the `pagan conversions¿ of the Northern Baltic. Centred on Poland (Prussia) and Latvia (Livonia) from the 13th to 15th c., this example will also be compared with neighbouring Lithuania, which never fell under the political hegemony of the Monastic Orders. Finally, the course covers the Iberian case, where the Reconquista ¿ or `reconquest¿ - of lands from Muslim groups concluded with the fall of Granada and the unification of Spain in 1492. Through archaeological and historical evidence, the materials, technologies and ideas of the crusading groups will be compared and contrasted, with a particularly emphasis on bioarchaeological datasets. Ultimately, the course deals with the economic, social and practical mechanisms used by the religious orders to `colonise¿, once the initial conquest had been achieved. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2013 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 343: Culture as Commodity

Focus is on theories of commodification, interests in tourism, national cultures as marketable objects, and how identities are constituted through production and consumption. The formation of global style and taste. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Co-term students and above may sign up for this course.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 344: Graphic Medicine

In this course students will study medical cultures through visual communication ranging from x-rays and PET scans to graphic novels. Course will also include literature on visual theory.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2010 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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