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221 - 230 of 408 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 210B: Examining Ethnographies (ANTHRO 110B)

Eight or nine important ethnographies, including their construction, their impact, and their faults and virtues.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 211: Archaeology of Sex, Sexuality, and Gender (ANTHRO 111)

How archaeologists study sex, sexuality, and gender through the material remains left behind by past cultures and communities. Theoretical and methodological issues; case studies from prehistoric and historic archaeology.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 211A: Archaeology of the Andes of Argentina (ANTHRO 111A)

The aim of this course is to provide a panorama of the archaeology of the andean region of Argentina, along some main topics of past and current researches. North andean Argentina has been considered for a long time as subordinated to the major developments in the central Andes and Puna, as if it were in a marginal position that mirrored their history. More than a hundred years of research in the area have produced different insights, which put that affirmation in relative terms. nThe course will give an overview of major historical contributions and contemporary trends in the archaeological thinking in relation to themes such as time, the space, people, things and nature. An overview of the conceptions and construction of time. Space seen as cultural area; natural environment and built landscape; archaeological areas as national territory. Historical conceptions of people; bodies; social inequality; the past and present others in the archaeological research. Artefacts, classifications more »
The aim of this course is to provide a panorama of the archaeology of the andean region of Argentina, along some main topics of past and current researches. North andean Argentina has been considered for a long time as subordinated to the major developments in the central Andes and Puna, as if it were in a marginal position that mirrored their history. More than a hundred years of research in the area have produced different insights, which put that affirmation in relative terms. nThe course will give an overview of major historical contributions and contemporary trends in the archaeological thinking in relation to themes such as time, the space, people, things and nature. An overview of the conceptions and construction of time. Space seen as cultural area; natural environment and built landscape; archaeological areas as national territory. Historical conceptions of people; bodies; social inequality; the past and present others in the archaeological research. Artefacts, classifications and typologies; material archaeological contexts as cultural units; from artefacts to things; past ontologies. Nature and environment; domestication; ecological approaches; agropastoralism; nature/culture. nIt is expected that by the end of the course students will gain a panorama of the major problems of the archaeology of andean Argentina with historically and theoretically informed perspectives.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2013 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 212: Public Archaeology: Market Street Chinatown Archaeology Project (ANTHRO 112, ASNAMST 112)

This internship-style course centers on the practice and theory of historical archaeology research and interpretation through a focused study of San Jose's historic Chinese communities. The course includes classroom lectures, seminar discussion, laboratory analysis of historic artifacts, and participation in public archaeology events. Course themes include immigration, urbanization, material culture, landscape, transnational identities, race and ethnicity, gender, cultural resource management, public history, and heritage politics. The course includes required lab sections, field trips, and public service. Transportation will be provided for off-site activities.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2014 | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 213: Culture and Epigenetics: Towards A Non-Darwinian Synthesis (ANTHRO 113)

The course examines the impact of new research in epigenetics on our understanding of long-term cultural change. The course examines the various attempts that have been made over recent decades to find a synthesis between cultural and biological evolution. These approaches, often termed neo-Darwinian, include memes, dual inheritance theory, theories of cultural selection and transmission, niche construction theory and macro-evolutionary approaches. Research in all these areas will be examined, with particular reference to explanations for the origins of agriculture, but also including other transformations, and critiqued. New research in epigenetics offers an alternative non-Darwinian evolutionary perspective that avoids many of the problems and pitfalls in the neo-Darwinian approaches. Cultural evolution comes to be viewed as cumulative, directional and Lamarckian, since heritable epigenetic variation can underlie evolutionary change. Epigenetics opens the way for human cultural entanglements to become the drivers for evolutionary change, thus allowing the full range of social processes studied in the social and cultural sciences to take their place in the study and analysis of long-term change.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hodder, I. (PI)

ANTHRO 213B: Religious Practices in Archaeological Cultures (ANTHRO 113B, ARCHLGY 113B)

According to Hawkes (1954), religion or ideology is the most difficult part of social life to access archaeologically. Luckily, not all scholars agree; according to Fogelin (2008) 'religion is not something people think about, but something people do¿. Thus, archaeology, an inherently multidisciplinary subject that studies material culture, is well suited to delve into religion and its underpinnings.nThis course will explore religious practices, as they can be defined and interpreted from archaeological contexts spanning the Paleolithic to historic periods. Definitions of religion differ from author to author but they mostly agree that religion is a fully integrated and thus integral part of human social life. Politics, economics, identity and social class influence religion, and religion influences how these forces play out in society. Thus, the course will also examine the significance of ritual and religion in a variety of social contexts.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2016 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 214: Prehistoric Stone Tools: Technology and Analysis (ANTHRO 114, ARCHLGY 114)

Archaeologists rely on an understanding of stone tools to trace much of what we know about prehistoric societies. How to make, illustrate, and analyze stone tools, revealing the method and theory intrinsic to these artifacts.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2016 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 214A: Introduction to South Asian Archaeolgy (ANTHRO 114A, ARCHLGY 114A)

This seminar will survey the archaeology of South Asia, beginning with animal and plant domestication in the early Holocene and ending with the late Medieval Period. Given its chronological breadth and spatial scope, the class will interrogate a variety of social and historical contexts that contribute to a broad range of anthropological research concerns¿including the intersections of authority, ritual, alterity and landscape¿and at the same time critically consider the epistemological bases for their analyses through archaeological remains.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2016 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 214B: Landscape Archaeology and Global Information Systematics (ANTHRO 114B)

This course is meant to lay groundwork for analysis of archaeological landscapes using the methods of GIS. Throughout, we consider the various understandings of landscape, from the biographical to the biological. The course explores the history of various typologies of landscape, incorporating the cultural, the topographical, the ecological, and the topological; reviews different types of landscape data and analysis, including aerial imagery, stratigraphic excavations, and specialized analyses; addresses how to integrate different sorts of data sets and carry out analytical assessment of interrelated "layers" as dynamic constituents of landscape; considers implications of landscape studies in modern policy and management. Students will create interpretive frameworks for a public audience as a component of the final project.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2014 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 215: The Social life of Human Bones (ANTHRO 115, ARCHLGY 115)

Skeletal remains serve a primary function of support and protection for the human body. However, beyond this, they have played a range of social roles once an individual is deceased. The processes associated with excarnation, interment, exhumation and reburial all speak to the place that the body, and its parts, play in our cultural as well as physical landscape.n This course builds on introductory courses in human skeletal anatomy by adding the social dynamics that govern the way humans treat other humans once they have died. It draws on anthropological, biological and archaeological research, with case studies spanning a broad chronological and spatial framework to provide students with an overview of social practice as it relates to the human body.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Seetah, K. (PI)
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