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211 - 220 of 408 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 202A: Ancient Civilizations: Complexity and Collapse (ANTHRO 102A)

How archaeology contributes to understanding prehistoric civilizations. How and why complex social institutions arose, and the conditions and processes behind their collapse. The development of monumental architecture, craft specialization, trade and exchange, and social stratification using examples from the archaeological record. (HEF II, III; DA-B)
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2010 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 203A: Human Osteoarchaeology (ANTHRO 103A)

The course will cover the methodological and theoretical backgrounds to human osteoarchaeology, introduce the student to the chemical and physical characteristics of bone, and to the functional morphology of the human skeleton. Classes will consist of a taught component that outlines how osteoarchaeologists reconstruct individual life-histories based on age, sex etc.; this is combined with hands-on identification of different skeletal elements and the markers used to inform the analytical methods. Additional scientific methodologies are also introduced that increasingly form a major component of human osteoarchaeology.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2014 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 204: Language and Culture (ANTHRO 4)

Comparative approach, using examples from many languages. Emphasis is on generally non-Western speech communities. Topics include: the structure of language; the theory of signs; vocabulary and culture; grammar, cognition, and culture (linguistic relativism and determinism); encodability of cultural information in language; language adaptiveness to social function; the ethnography of speaking; registers; discourse (conversation, narrative, verbal art); language and power; language survival and extinction; and linguistic ideology (beliefs about language).
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2014 | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 205: Ancient Cities in the New World (ANTHRO 105)

Preindustrial urbanism as exemplified by prehispanic New World societies. Case studies: the central and southern highlands of Mesoamerica, and the Maya region. Comparative material from highland S. America.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2011 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 205A: Archaeological Fieldwork: Critical Analysis and Practical Application (ANTHRO 105A)

This introduction to archaeological fieldwork involves both field and seminarncomponents, each component meeting once per week. During the field sessions,nwe will investigate an archaeological site on campus using methods of survey,nmapping, testing, and excavation (digging, recording units/features, profilenillustration). In seminar, we will critically examine archaeological fieldworknthrough reading, writing, and discussion, exploring topics such as history ofnarchaeological excavation, production of archaeological knowledge, disjuncturenbetween theory and practice, reflexive methodologies, ethics, collaboration, andnspecialization. No experience necessary, but students with fieldwork experiencenare welcome.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2013 | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 206: Human Origins (ANTHRO 6, HUMBIO 6)

The human fossil record from the first non-human primates in the late Cretaceous or early Paleocene, 80-65 million years ago, to the anatomically modern people in the late Pleistocene, between 100,000 to 50,000 B.C.E. Emphasis is on broad evolutionary trends and the natural selective forces behind them.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2013 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 206A: Incas and their Ancestors: Peruvian Archaeology (ANTHRO 106, ARCHLGY 102B)

The development of high civilizations in Andean S. America from hunter-gatherer origins to the powerful, expansive Inca empire. The contrasting ecologies of coast, sierra, and jungle areas of early Peruvian societies from 12,000 to 2,000 B.C.E. The domestication of indigenous plants which provided the economic foundation for monumental cities, ceramics, and textiles. Cultural evolution, and why and how major transformations occurred.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Rick, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 209A: Archaeology of the Modern World (ANTHRO 109A, ARCHLGY 109A)

Historical archaeology, also called the archaeology of the modern world, investigates the material culture and spatial history of the past five centures. As a discipline, historical archaeology has been characterized by (1) a methodological conjunction between history and archaeology; (2) a topical focus on the ¿three Cs¿: colonization, captivity, and capitalism ¿ forces which arguably are constitutive of the modern world; and (3) an epistemological priority to recovering the perspectives of ¿people without history.¿ Each of these three trends is widely debated yet they continue to profoundly shape the field. This seminar provides an in-depth examination of the emergence and development of this historical archaeology, with a focus on current issues in theory and method. For undergraduates, the prerequisite is Anthro 3 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Voss, B. (PI)

ANTHRO 210: Environmental Archaeology (ANTHRO 110, ARCHLGY 110)

This course investigates the field of environmental archaeology. Its goals are twofold: 1) to critically consider the intellectual histories of environmental archaeology, and, 2) to survey the various techniques and methods by which archaeologists assess historical environmental conditions through material proxies. The course will include lab activities.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Bauer, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 210A: Neandertals and Modern Humans: Origin, Evolution, Interactions (ANTHRO 110A)

The expansion out of Africa of our species represents the last spectacular step in the course of Human Evolution. It resulted in the colonization of the whole planet and the replacement of archaic forms of humans in Eurasia. One way to investigate why Homo sapiens has been such a successful species is to compare its evolution with that of its closest relative, the Neandertals. Exploring the bio-cultural processes at work in the two lineages leads to examine some of the main issues in Paleoanthropology and the most recent methodological advances in the field.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2011 | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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