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111 - 120 of 408 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 126: Urban Culture in Global Perspective (URBANST 114)

Core course for Urban Studies majors. We will study urban space both historically and cross-culturally. Urban Studies, by definition, is an interdisciplinary field, where the methodological approaches draw upon a diverse set of analytic tools. Disciplines that occupy a prominent place in this class are geography, cultural anthropology, sociology, history, media studies, and literature. In this context, we will discuss the importance of cities around the world to the economic, cultural, and political well-being of modern societies and examine how forces such as industrialization, decentralization, and globalization affect the structure and function of cities.
Terms: given next year, last offered Autumn 2016 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 126A: Politics of the Past (ANTHRO 226A, ARCHLGY 126A)

The past is never dead, William Faulkner once wrote. It's not even past. This seminar explores the contested meanings of history in the political present. It particularly focuses on how archaeological work and heritage becomes entangled in larger questions of identity, belonging, belief, economics, and the stories we tell about ourselves. Students will gain an expansive and in-depth perspective on why humans so value what has come before us, and why making meaning from the past is a process suffused with power.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 128: Visual Studies

Drawing on anthropology, art history, cultural studies, and other fields, this course explores how and why one might want to think critically about the politics of visuality, social imagination, the politics of making and consuming images and things, iconophonia and iconophilia, the classification of people and things into ¿artists¿ and ¿art¿, and cultural production more generally.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Malkki, L. (PI)

ANTHRO 128A: The Boundaries of Humanity: Humans, Animals and Machines in the Age of Biotechnology

Advances in research and technology are blurring the boundaries between humans, animals, and machines, challenging conventional notions of human nature. Seminar explores the question of what it now means to be human and the personal, social, and ethical implications of our advancing technologies through the lens of various disciplines, including anthropology, cognitive psychology, neuroscience, genetics, evolutionary biology, biotechnology, and artificial intelligence. Includes guest speakers from fields and industries where important questions are being raised.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2016 | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 130B: Introduction to GIS in Anthropology (ANTHRO 230B)

How GIS and spatial tools can be applied in social research. Case studies and student projects address questions of social and cultural relevance using real data sets, including the collection of geospatial data and building of spatial evidence. Analytical approaches and how they can shape a social and cultural interpretation of space and place.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2013 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 130D: Spatial Approaches to Social Science (ANTHRO 230D, POLISCI 241S, URBANST 124)

This multidisciplinary course combines different approaches to how GIS and spatial tools can be applied in social science research. We take a collaborative, project oriented approach to bring together technical expertise and substantive applications from several social science disciplines. The course aims to integrate tools, methods, and current debates in social science research and will enable students to engage in critical spatial research and a multidisciplinary dialogue around geographic space.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 131: Genes and Identity (AFRICAAM 131, CSRE 131)

In recent decades genes have increasingly become endowed with the cultural power to explain many aspects of human life: physical traits, diseases, behaviors, ancestral histories, and identity. In this course we will explore a deepening societal intrigue with genetic accounts of personal identity and political meaning. Students will engage with varied interdisciplinary sources that range from legal cases to scientific articles, medical ethics guidelines, films, and ethnographies. We will explore several case studies where the use of DNA markers (either as proof of heritage or disease risk) has spawned cultural movements that are biosocial in nature. nnExamples include legal and political analyses of African ancestry testing as ¿evidence¿ in slavery reparations cases, debates on whether Black Freedman should be allowed into the Cherokee and Seminole Nations, considerations on whether people with genetic links to Jewish groups should have a right of return to Israel, close readings of The more »
In recent decades genes have increasingly become endowed with the cultural power to explain many aspects of human life: physical traits, diseases, behaviors, ancestral histories, and identity. In this course we will explore a deepening societal intrigue with genetic accounts of personal identity and political meaning. Students will engage with varied interdisciplinary sources that range from legal cases to scientific articles, medical ethics guidelines, films, and ethnographies. We will explore several case studies where the use of DNA markers (either as proof of heritage or disease risk) has spawned cultural movements that are biosocial in nature. nnExamples include legal and political analyses of African ancestry testing as ¿evidence¿ in slavery reparations cases, debates on whether Black Freedman should be allowed into the Cherokee and Seminole Nations, considerations on whether people with genetic links to Jewish groups should have a right of return to Israel, close readings of The U.S. Food and Drug Administration¿s crackdown on personal genomics testing companies (such as 23andMe), examinations of genetic identity politics in health disparities funding and orphan disease research, inquiries into new social movements organized around gene-based definitions of personhood, and civil liberties concerns about genetic ¿familial searching¿ in forensic databases that disproportionately target specific minority groups as criminal suspects. nnStudents will engage in a short observational ¿pilot¿ ethnographic project that allows them to further explore issues from the course for their final paper.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2014 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 132: Religion and Politics in the Muslim World

This course provides an ethnographic examination of religion and politics in the Muslim world. What is the role of Islam in the political life of modern Muslim societies? Conversely, how do modern political powers shape and constrain the terms of religious life? This course takes an anthropological perspective on the study of Islam: our investigations will not focus on the origins of scriptures and doctrines but rather on the use of religious texts and signs in social context and on the political significance of ritual and bodily practices. A major aim of the course is provide students with analytical resources for thinking critically about the history and politics of modern Muslim societies, with a particular focus on issues of religious authority, gender and sexuality, and the politics of secularism.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2013 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 132B: Islam Law in Muslim and Non-Muslim Societies

In this course, students will engage with scholarly material that demonstrates the multiple and varying ways in which Islam is invoked as a legal discourse in Muslim and Non- Muslim societies. In this course, we look at Islam not merely as being in the domain of legislation and adjudication, but as a cultural object; an important signifier in politics, for the state to enforce itself, as well as a technology for people¿s strategic use. The point of this course is therefore to consider how Islam operates in legal contexts as a 1) discourse of power and of strategy (at personal and political levels) and 2) as a discourse of identity that concerns issues of ethics, rights, gender, kinship, class and nation.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2015 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 133A: Anthropology of the Middle East (CSRE 133A)

This course examines social, political, and religious dimensions of various Middle Eastern societies. Key topics include the development of the modern nation-state, the Islamic revival, human rights, and discourses of democracy. Course materials include ethnographic studies, novels, and films, which provide a rich contextualization of social life and cultural politics in the region.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2014 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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