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261 - 270 of 446 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 222A: Race and Culture in Mexico and Central America (ANTHRO 122A)

This course addresses the role of racial ideologies in the historical configuration of multiple hierarchies of inequality that determine the place of everyone in society in Mexico and Central America. Based on readings from the humanities and social sciences, we will discuss the cultural and racial politics of authoritarianism and indigenous insurgency, emphasizing narratives of laziness and vagrancy that have been central to the discipline of labor that shapes local processes of regressive modernization and nation building. We will analyze the hegemony of dictatorship as political necessity, the relationship between local racisms and global Whiteness, and the emergence of new local and transnational contestations to the multiple hierarchies that determine the place of everyone in society.
Last offered: Spring 2015

ANTHRO 222C: Research in Maya Hieroglyphic Writing (ANTHRO 122C)

Workshop. Current issues in the decipherment and analysis of Maya hieroglyphic writing and literacy.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 223: Readings in Linguistic Anthropology (ANTHRO 123)

One or two major related works on language in its cultural context. Works for 2007-08 involve attempts to correlate linguistic and non-linguistic data for analysis of prehistoric human contact and migrations. May be repeated for credit.
| Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 223A: Debating Repatriation (ANTHRO 123A, ARCHLGY 123A)

The debates over the return of cultural property have raged for centuries. At stake are key questions about the rights of Indigenous peoples, intellectual freedom, nationalism, globalization, heritage management, the meaning of history, and the purpose of museums in the world. This seminar examines these vital discussions that intersect law and morality, science and religion, culture and politics. Discussions will be informed by cross-cultural, legal, ethical perspectives, exploring both the philosophical and practical implications of the repatriation debates. This course will provide students with a nuanced historical viewpoint of museum collections, heritage policies, and legal dimensions that underpin contests over cultural property.
Last offered: Spring 2017

ANTHRO 225: Language and the Environment (ANTHRO 125)

Lecture course on vocabulary and grammar as keys to peoples¿ understanding and use of the environment. Ethnobotany, ethnobiology, and ethnosemantics in the analysis of the language of place, plants and animals, the earth, the body, and disease. Terminological gaps and gluts and what they imply. Language as a strategic resource in environmental management. Language contact and conflict in the modern global environment, with particular attention to the vocabularies of capitalism and property. Language extinction and its environmental implications. Anthropology concentration: CS, EE. No prerequisites.
Last offered: Autumn 2015

ANTHRO 226A: Politics of the Past (ANTHRO 126A, ARCHLGY 126A)

The past is never dead, William Faulkner once wrote. It's not even past. This seminar explores the contested meanings of history in the political present. It particularly focuses on how archaeological work and heritage becomes entangled in larger questions of identity, belonging, belief, economics, and the stories we tell about ourselves. Students will gain an expansive and in-depth perspective on why humans so value what has come before us, and why making meaning from the past is a process suffused with power.
Last offered: Spring 2017

ANTHRO 230B: Introduction to GIS in Anthropology (ANTHRO 130B)

How GIS and spatial tools can be applied in social research. Case studies and student projects address questions of social and cultural relevance using real data sets, including the collection of geospatial data and building of spatial evidence. Analytical approaches and how they can shape a social and cultural interpretation of space and place.
Last offered: Winter 2013

ANTHRO 230D: Spatial Approaches to Social Science (ANTHRO 130D, POLISCI 241S, URBANST 124)

This multidisciplinary course combines different approaches to how GIS and spatial tools can be applied in social science research. We take a collaborative, project oriented approach to bring together technical expertise and substantive applications from several social science disciplines. The course aims to integrate tools, methods, and current debates in social science research and will enable students to engage in critical spatial research and a multidisciplinary dialogue around geographic space.
Terms: Win | Units: 5

ANTHRO 234: Object Lessons (ANTHRO 134)

Human-object relations in the processes of world making. Objectification and materiality through ethnography, archaeology, material culture studies, and cultural studies. Interpretive connotations around and beyond the object, the unstable terrain of interrelationships between sociality and materiality, and the cultural constitution of objects. Sources include: works by Marx, Hegel, and Mauss; classic Pacific ethnographies of exchange, circulation, alienability, and fetishism; and material culture studies.
Last offered: Winter 2014

ANTHRO 235: Cultural Studies (ANTHRO 135)

Identity, community, and culture; their interactions and formation.
Last offered: Winter 2013
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