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371 - 380 of 408 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 369: Advanced Topics in Human Behavioral

Course covers a variety of advanced topics which rotate annually, such as: ownership and egalitarianism, the integration of landscape and behavioral ecology, conservation and indigenous subsistence, or fertility and demography. Course may be repeated for credit when topics change.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2014 | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 370: Advanced Theory and Method in Historical Archaeology

Current debates about theory and method. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2013 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 371: Living and Dying in the Contemporary World

This seminar explores how biological, political and social conditions transform and conjoin experiences of living and dying in the world today. Engaging contemporary ethnographies and social theory, we will examine how life and death, the natural and the social, the individual and the collective, are braided together in ways that challenge conclusions about what constitutes care, community, health, rights, and violence, among other issues. We will also reflect on whether and how the braiding together of these domains leaves room for the recognition of their singularity. Thus, an abiding question for this seminar is the relation of history to the present. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 371B: New Methodologies in the Humanities and Social Sciences (DLCL 371, REES 371B)

The course will discuss how social virtues are converted into methods of research (hope, friendship, sincerity, trust, utopia), and how they affect processes of knowledge building within the humanities and social sciences in terms of revival of futurity. The concepts will be critically examined in their positive as well as negative potential for practicing prefigurative politics the creation of desirable modes of social relationships of conviviality and co-existence in the world.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 372: Urban Ecologies

At the intersections of urbanism and environmental studies, political ecology, postcolonial theory and the new materialism, new fields are in formation. This seminar explores scholarship that connects cities with countrysides rough questions of resources and infrastructures. We will consider questions id inequality access and community as well as unexpected urban ecologies
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Ebron, P. (PI)

ANTHRO 372A: Materiality

The relationships between people and things. The world of objects plays a major role in materialism and the anthropology of material culture. Approaches that break down subject-object opposition. New social and psychological approaches that explore the mutual constitution of people and things, and object and subject. Approaches in which objects are seen to have agency, and people are seen as entangled in object worlds. Authors include Hegel, Marx, Benjamin, Miller, Gell, and Latour. Prerequisite, by instructor consent.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2016 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 373: Things: An Archaeology of the Relationships Between Humans and Things

This course examines a variety of approaches that claim to explore the relationships between humans and things. Some of the approaches include Marx and material culture studies; Heidegger; cognitive and phenomenological; Actor Network Theory. But there is a need also to examine behavioral and ecological and Darwinian approaches. Many of these approaches do not adequately deal with the physicality of things as objects and there is a need to seek a way to incorporate such aspects of things into social theory. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hodder, I. (PI)

ANTHRO 374: Archaeology of Colonialism/Postcolonialisms

Advanced graduate seminar focused on the archaeology of colonial and postcolonial contexts, both prehistoric and historic. Emphasis on intersections between archaeological research and and subaltern, postcolonial, and transnational feminist/queer theory. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2016 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 376: Archaeology: The Emergence of a Discipline

This course explores the key thinkers and practitioners who have founded the discipline of archaeology. Reaching back into the nineteenth century, the course examines in depth the key figures, their preoccupations and projects that shaped the way that archaeology grew through the 20th and into the 21st century. Global in scope, the emphasis will be on field projects and practical problems that stimulated the intellectual development of archaeology as an independent discipline closely tied to geology, history, anthropology, and the natural sciences. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 377: Authority: Anthropological Perspectives

Why do people obey others in the absence of explicit coercion? Why do people accept some leaders but not others? What does it mean to say something or someone has authority? Is authority personal or institutional? Why do people believe in the Pope? Why do people believe some objects have power and others not? Is charisma only a perfume? Can institutions wield charismatic power? These are questions that from Max Weber onwards classical and contemporary anthropologists and sociologists continue to ask.nnIn returning to (Weberian) questions of authority and legitimacy this course takes a question posed by Bourdieu ¿ what is the mystery of ministry? We will apply the question of authority broadly, not just in the explicitly political realm but also to understand, for example, how (culturally specific) charismatic and sacral authority can be fashioned through persons and through objects (eg. relics). The course will thus move between interrelated religious, moral, and political notions to try to generate some critical questions for how a contemporary anthropology that explicitly (rather than implicitly) re-addresses authority might look.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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