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261 - 270 of 408 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 254B: Anthropology of Drugs: Experience, Capitalism, Modernity (ANTHRO 154, CSRE 154)

This course examines the significant role ¿drugs¿ play in shaping expressions of the self and social life; in the management populations, and in the production of markets and inequality. It engages these themes through cultural representations of drugs and drug use, analyses of scientific discourse, and social theory. Topics include: the social construction of the licit and illicit; the shifting boundaries of deviance, disease and pleasure; and the relationship between local markets and global wars.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Garcia, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 255: Research Methods in Ecological Anthropology (ANTHRO 155)

The course prepare students for the methodological and practical aspects of doing ecologically oriented, quantitative anthropological field research. The primary goal is to explore what it means to ask anthropological questions in a systematic way. We will focus on understanding what can constitute an interesting question, how to frame a question in way that facilitates investigation, and how to design methods to begin investigating a question. In turn, the course will provide a format to refine research projects in preparation for doing more extensive fieldwork.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2015 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 256: Japanese Anthropology (ANTHRO 156)

This is an advanced reading seminar in the field of Japanses Anthropology. nIt will explore the historical development of the field and the contemporary issues and topics taken up by scholars of Japanese anthropology. Prior knowledge of Japanese language, history, and, society is required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Inoue, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 259C: Ecological Humanities (ANTHRO 159C, DLCL 259C, REES 259C)

What sort of topics, research questions, approaches, theories and concepts lead to an integration of various kinds of knowledges? Ecological Humanities provides a conceptual platform for a merger of humanities and social sciences with earth and life sciences, soil science and forensic sciences. The course will discuss such selected topics as the Anthropocene, geologic/mineral and exhumed subjects/personae, bio- and geosocial collectives, symbiotic life-forms, non-human agencies, and forensic landscapes as examples of this merger.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Domanska, E. (PI)

ANTHRO 260: Social and Environmental Sustainability: The Costa Rican Case (ANTHRO 160)

Seminar focused on issues of tropical sustainability with a particular emphasis on the Osa Peninsula of Costa Rica. Offered in conjunction with the Osa Initiative in the Wood¿s Institute for the Environment, the course highlights issues of human development in the tropics, through such means as agricultural development, ecotourism, conservation efforts, private and indigenous reserves, and mining. The course will draw from diverse disciplines including anthropology, rural sociology, conservation biology, geosciences, history, political science, and journalism. In addition to weekly discussions, students will development a research paper throughout the term which will be presented to a panel of selected Wood¿s Faculty during the final week of the term.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2015 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 260A: Tragedy of the Commons: Human Ecology of Communal Resources (ANTHRO 160A)

The ¿tragedy of the commons¿ is a classic social dilemma ¿ a situation in which individual interests conflict with collective ones ¿ and key to understanding past, present and future environmental degradation. This course surveys a variety of scientific perspectives on the essence of the tragedy: common property resources will ultimately be destroyed by overexploitation. Major themes include the effects of human population density and social organization on the health and management of commons, self-interest versus collective action, and potential solutions to commons problems. Modern and prehistoric case studies are examined from ecological and evolutionary perspectives.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2013 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 261A: Human Ecology: Adaptations to Climate and Climate Change (ANTHRO 161A)

Humans face essentially the same adaptive challenges as all organisms but are unique for having successfully adapted to virtually every environment on Earth. The resulting diversity of phenotypes and cultures¿past and present¿is key to understanding how interactions with environments shape the economic, social, and cultural lives of hunter-gatherers, pastoralists and agriculturalists. This course surveys the range of human adaptations from an ecological and evolutionary perspective to understand human adaptive capacity and vulnerability to climate change.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2012 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 262: Indigenous Peoples and Environmental Problems (ANTHRO 162)

The social and cultural consequences of contemporary environmental problems. The impact of market economies, development efforts, and conservation projects on indigenous peoples, emphasizing Latin America. The role of indigenous grass roots organizations in combating environmental destruction and degradation of homeland areas.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2016 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 263: Conservation and Evolutionary Ecology (ANTHRO 163)

Environmental degradation resulting from human behavior, and what can be done about it. Patterns of interaction between people and environments, and why they vary over time and space. Topics include adaptation and behavior, resource acquisition and utilization, conflicts of interest, collective action problems, conspicuous consumption, waste, land management, and public policy.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2010 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 263A: Endangered Languages and Language Revitalization (ANTHRO 163A, LINGUIST 163A, LINGUIST 263, NATIVEAM 163)

Languages around the world are dying at such a rapid rate that the next century could see half of the world's 6800 languages and cultures become extinct unless action is taken now. This course looks at how and why languages die, and what is lost from a culture when that occurs. We will investigate how this trend can be reversed by methods of language documentation and description, the use of innovative technologies, multimodal fieldwork, writing dictionaries and grammars for different audiences, language planning, and data creation, annotation, preservation, and dissemination. We will focus on a number of current programs around the world to revitalize languages. Finally, the course will examine ethical modes of fieldwork within endangered language communities, and the possibilities of successful collaborations and capacity building, focusing especially on Northern California Indian peoples and their languages.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2015 | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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