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421 - 430 of 450 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 375: Archaeology and Globalism

The emergence of archaeology as a discipline in the context of the rise of the nation state. Global economies and other issues have created a new context for archaeology. How are archaeology and heritage responding? The idea of world heritage. The impact of postcolonialism. The commodification of the past: the past as theme park, as travel tourism or nostalgia, as exotic and other. Conflict between uses of the past for identity and as theme park; between heritage and resource or play. The impact of the Goddess, New Age, and other movements. Archaeology and human rights issues including forensic archaeology. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 376: Archaeology: The Emergence of a Discipline

This course explores the key thinkers and practitioners who have founded the discipline of archaeology. Reaching back into the nineteenth century, the course examines in depth the key figures, their preoccupations and projects that shaped the way that archaeology grew through the 20th and into the 21st century. Global in scope, the emphasis will be on field projects and practical problems that stimulated the intellectual development of archaeology as an independent discipline closely tied to geology, history, anthropology, and the natural sciences. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Last offered: Winter 2014

ANTHRO 377: Authority: Anthropological Perspectives

Why do people obey others in the absence of explicit coercion? Why do people accept some leaders but not others? What does it mean to say something or someone has authority? Is authority personal or institutional? Why do people believe in the Pope? Why do people believe some objects have power and others not? Is charisma only a perfume? Can institutions wield charismatic power? These are questions that from Max Weber onwards classical and contemporary anthropologists and sociologists continue to ask.nnIn returning to (Weberian) questions of authority and legitimacy this course takes a question posed by Bourdieu ¿ what is the mystery of ministry? We will apply the question of authority broadly, not just in the explicitly political realm but also to understand, for example, how (culturally specific) charismatic and sacral authority can be fashioned through persons and through objects (eg. relics). The course will thus move between interrelated religious, moral, and political notions to try to generate some critical questions for how a contemporary anthropology that explicitly (rather than implicitly) re-addresses authority might look.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

ANTHRO 378: Dynamics of Coupled Human-Natural Systems

This is a graduate research seminar on the interdisciplinary approach to the study of the dynamics of what is known as "coupled human-natural systems." We will take a critical perspective on such systems, asking to what extent the idea of coupling of discrete subsystems is intellectually profitable and what defines a "human" vs. a "natural" system? We will explore concepts such as coupling, nonlinearity, threshold behavior, feedback, complexity, resilience, and catastrophes. Case studies will be drawn from the literature on human ecology, population dynamics, disease ecology, and social dynamics. Emphasis will be on developing a working knowledge of mathematical and computational models of coupled systems embedded within a rigorous empirical framework of biosocial data collection.

ANTHRO 379: Empathy Lab (TAPS 284)

This lab-based class examines the ways in which various disciplines and art forms conceive of, and tell stories about, the experiences and stories of others. With permission of instructor.
Last offered: Winter 2015

ANTHRO 379A: Empathy Lab II: The Potential of Anthropology for the 21st Century (TAPS 379A)

This interdisciplinary arts/anthropology lab class will study and practice methods from performing arts to expand our understandings of cultural contact and develop methods of thinking more expansively about the creative elements and possibilities for ethnographic fieldwork and critical cultural studies. Prerequisite, by instructor consent.
Last offered: Winter 2016 | Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 379B: Empathy Lab II: The Potential of Anthropology for the 21st Century

This interdisciplinary arts/anthropology lab class will study and practice methods from performing arts to expand our understandings of cultural contact and develop methods of thinking more expansively about the creative elements and possibilities for ethnographic fieldwork and critical cultural studies.
Last offered: Spring 2016

ANTHRO 380: Practice and Performance: Bourdieu, Butler, Giddens, de Certeau

Poststructuralist theories of iteration and mimesis used by social scientists to negotiate the tension between social structure and social practice: Gidden's structuration theory; Bourdieu's practice theory; Butler's theories of gender performativity; and de Certeau's analysis of tactics and strategies. Ethnographic and archaeological case studies that employ methodologies inspired by these approaches. Intersections and contradictions between these theorists' work; their use in anthropological practice. Issues of gender, sexuality, and ethnicity. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Last offered: Winter 2010

ANTHRO 381: Archaeology of Violence

This advanced graduate seminar reflects on archaeological research on violence in relation to readings in philosophy, political anthropology, cultural studies, and gender and ethnic studies. While some forensic approaches are discussed, the emphasis is more on structural and collective violence and the role of violence in the formation of the archaeological record.
Last offered: Spring 2016

ANTHRO 382: Advanced Topics in Medical Anthropology

Graduate seminar. The history and theories of medical anthropology. Focus is on medical anthropology's transformations in the 20th century: how medical anthropology has emerged as a field of inquiry, grown in dialogue with other areas of scholarships, and come to offer a unique array of theoretical positions and modes of ethnographic engagement. Emphasis is on debates within interpretive and critical medical anthropology, and how an understanding of these debates may be used to assess contemporary works within the field. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2012
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