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201 - 210 of 450 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 170: Australian Ecosystems: Human Dimensions and Environmental Dynamics (ANTHRO 270, EARTHSYS 172)

This cross-disciplinary course surveys the history and prehistory of human ecological dynamics in Australia, drawing on geology, climatology, archaeology, geography, ecology and anthropology to understand the mutual dynamic relationships between the continent and its inhabitants. Topics include anthropogenic fire and fire ecology, animal extinctions, aridity and climate variability, colonization and spread of Homo sapiens, invasive species interactions, changes in human subsistence and mobility throughout the Pleistocene and Holocene as read through the archaeological record, the totemic geography and social organization of Aboriginal people at the time of European contact, the ecological and geographical aspects of the "Dreamtime", and contemporary issues of policy relative to Aboriginal land tenure and management.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 170A: Multispecies Ethnography: Human, Animal, Plant, Mineral, and Microbe (ANTHRO 270A)

This course explores new modes of writing and researching in anthropology. Multispecies ethnography considers nonhuman life as objects of analysis¿animals, plants, fungi, bacteria, and viruses¿as having political lives and import. By studying how these nonhuman entities, including metals, interact with and shape human existence, multispecies ethnographers who study ¿life¿ ¿ from the human down to the microbe, must engage in multiple worlds: from the jungle to the laboratory, from the field to the desk. This course will incorporate readings on ¿zoe¿ and ¿bios¿, the making of species categories, relationships between the human and nonhuman, current debates on breaking with the species concept and ¿the rights of mother earth.¿ We will read the conceptual works in conjunction with current multispecies ethnographies to give grounding to the theory.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 171: The Biology and Evolution of Language (ANTHRO 271, HUMBIO 145L)

Lecture course surveying the biology, linguistic functions, and evolution of the organs of speech and speech centers in the brain, language in animals and humans, the evolution of language itself, and the roles of innateness vs. culture in language. Suitable both for general education and as preparation for further studies in anthropology, biology, linguistics, medicine, psychology, and speech & language therapy. Anthropology concentration: CS, EE. No prerequisites.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 171A: Linguistic Field Methods

Workshop applying methods for gathering and analyzing linguistic data in the field, i.e., from consultants who are native speakers of a language essentially unknown to the investigator. Principles of language documentation. Students will do local field projects and work on these both in and out of class. Format involves lectures, discussion, working with native speakers, and student presentations. Topics include: choosing a language; planning the project; computerized collection, storage, and analysis of linguistic data; field recording equipment; interviews and elicitation; diagnostic vocabulary lists and grammatical schedules; field study of everyday communication and discourse; area surveys and the ethnography of communication; ethics, reflexivity, and bias; working with human subjects and governments. Prerequisite: a course in linguistics or in anthropological field methods.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 172: Seminar on Cultural Evolution and Coevolution (ANTHRO 272)

Upper division/graduate seminar on recent approaches to the study of cultural evolution and coevolution. Critical evaluation of Darwinian and non-Darwinian theories, with special attention to the interplay of culture, genes, environment and society. Students will undertake projects of their own design to review, test, or improve current theoretical formulations. Prerequisite: a university-level course in evolution, ecology, or human behavioral biology.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 172B: Anthropology of Gender/Sexuality: Eco-Feminist Persepctives (ANTHRO 272B)

This course takes an eco-feminist approach to anthropology, investigating the different meanings of ¿eco¿ in eco-nomy and eco-logy. The term, ¿eco¿, from the Greek, ¿oikos,¿ means ¿household,¿ ¿house,¿ or ¿family¿, laying the foundation for examining women¿s roles in changing forms of kinship, beyond and within the concept of the human.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 173: Human Dimensions of Global Environmental Change: Resilence, Vulnerability, and Environmental Justice (HUMBIO 111)

The complexity of social and political issues surrounding global environmental change. Emphasis is on synergies precipitated by human-induced climatic change. Case studies and scenarios to explore the vulnerability and resilience in households, communities, regions, and nationmstates most affected by extreme weather conditions. Their concerns, livelihood changes, and diverse responses of rural smallholders, indigenous communities, the state, and local and regional migrants. Central theme is environmental justice.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 174: Beginnings of Social Complexity (ANTHRO 274)

Models and examples of the social evolution of stratification and political centralization in prehistoric human societies. Inferences from the archaeological record concerning the forces and mechanisms behind the rise and fall of complex societies, particularly in S. America. (HEF II; DA-B)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 175: Human Skeletal Anatomy (ANTHRO 275, BIO 174, BIO 274, HUMBIO 180)

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual¿s age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Klein, R. (PI)

ANTHRO 176: Cultures, Minds, and Medicine (ANTHRO 276)

This workshop aims to bring together scholars from the social sciences, humanities, medicine and bio-science and technology to explore the ways that health and illness are made through complex social forces. We aim for informal, interactive sessions, full of debate and good will. Dates of meetings will be listed in the notes section in the time schedule.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Luhrmann, T. (PI)
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