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131 - 140 of 450 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 131B: Six degrees:Introduction to social network analysis for Anthropologists

What are social networks and how do they influence patterns we observe in the world around us? Although the rise of social media and big data has made social network analysis (SNA) a hot topic in recent years, scholars in anthropology and sociology have been analyzing social networks and interaction patterns - and related debates over structure and agency - since the early days of these disciplines.nThis course will introduce upper-level undergraduates to the theory and methods used in social network analysis. Coursework will involve problem sets, student presentations, and weekly participation. The main output of the course however will be a student-designed project analyzing social relationships in a community (virtual, historical, or physical-world) of interest. There are no prerequisites, but familiarity with R would be helpful. Lectures on R will be provided early in the course, so if you¿re interested in thinking creatively about social relationships, don't let your lack of programming experience be a deterrent!
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Brown, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 132: Religion and Politics in the Muslim World

This course provides an ethnographic examination of religion and politics in the Muslim world. What is the role of Islam in the political life of modern Muslim societies? Conversely, how do modern political powers shape and constrain the terms of religious life? This course takes an anthropological perspective on the study of Islam: our investigations will not focus on the origins of scriptures and doctrines but rather on the use of religious texts and signs in social context and on the political significance of ritual and bodily practices. A major aim of the course is provide students with analytical resources for thinking critically about the history and politics of modern Muslim societies, with a particular focus on issues of religious authority, gender and sexuality, and the politics of secularism.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 132A: Theories of Science, Technology, and Culture

Do science and technology have cultures? Or, being factual and technical, are they beyond cultural analysis? Modern science and technology are some of the defining features of the contemporary world, but they often resist being understood in their social and cultural contexts. This class introduces students to key theoretical approaches in the social study of science alongside recent ethnographic studies. The class will cover concepts like objectivity, boundary-work, materiality, and indigenous knowledge. We will also analyze the design, use, and repair of technologies, as well as the politics folded into them. We will look at medical science and technology, including assumptions about race, class, and health disparities. By the end of the course, students will learn to see science, technology, and medicine as social and cultural products that can be analyzed with anthropological research methods.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Droney, D. (PI)

ANTHRO 132B: Islam Law in Muslim and Non-Muslim Societies

In this course, students will engage with scholarly material that demonstrates the multiple and varying ways in which Islam is invoked as a legal discourse in Muslim and Non- Muslim societies. In this course, we look at Islam not merely as being in the domain of legislation and adjudication, but as a cultural object; an important signifier in politics, for the state to enforce itself, as well as a technology for people¿s strategic use. The point of this course is therefore to consider how Islam operates in legal contexts as a 1) discourse of power and of strategy (at personal and political levels) and 2) as a discourse of identity that concerns issues of ethics, rights, gender, kinship, class and nation.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 133A: Anthropology of the Middle East (CSRE 133A)

This course examines social, political, and religious dimensions of various Middle Eastern societies. Key topics include the development of the modern nation-state, the Islamic revival, human rights, and discourses of democracy. Course materials include ethnographic studies, novels, and films, which provide a rich contextualization of social life and cultural politics in the region.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 133B: Covering Islam: On What We Learn to See, Think and Hear about Islam & Muslims (AFRICAST 133B, CSRE 133B)

In this course, students will think critically about how knowledge about Islam, Muslims, and Muslim Societies is produced and circulated. As a class, we will consider why and how certain kinds of ideas about Islam and Muslims become representative (i.e., authoritative discourse) while others ideas do not. This is an interdisciplinary class; course material will draw on readings from anthropology, literary criticism, history, sociology and media and cultural studies. We will also be engaging with other kinds of material, including news articles, editorials, documentaries, and films.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 134: Object Lessons (ANTHRO 234)

Human-object relations in the processes of world making. Objectification and materiality through ethnography, archaeology, material culture studies, and cultural studies. Interpretive connotations around and beyond the object, the unstable terrain of interrelationships between sociality and materiality, and the cultural constitution of objects. Sources include: works by Marx, Hegel, and Mauss; classic Pacific ethnographies of exchange, circulation, alienability, and fetishism; and material culture studies.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 134B: Conflict and Change in the Middle East

Following the Arab Spring, the hope for political and social change has been widely raised and celebrated in the Middle East. This hope, however, has been shattered alongside the recent cycles of violence and conflict in different parts of the region, from Syria and Iraq to Egypt. This course examines political violence, change, and boundary making in the modern Middle East. By taking a historical and anthropological look at the political conflict and change, this course will explore how particular political, economic, and social narratives, encounters, and contradictions have accompanied the conflict and change in the region. The course will focus on the cases from Turkey, Iraq, Syria, Iran, Egypt, Morocco, and Israel/Palestine.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 135: Cultural Studies (ANTHRO 235)

Identity, community, and culture; their interactions and formation.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 135A: The Anthropology of Security (ANTHRO 235A)

This seminar begins by outlining the main theoretical and empirical challenges in the areas of surveillance studies and security studies. The seminar provides a space wherein students will be able to discuss these inter-disciplinary areas and develop their own Anthropology-informed perspectives. The seminar then discusses the work of Anthropologists who through their ethnographic and theoretical work have helped developed and important and emergent area: ¿The Anthropology of Security¿. Areas covered include, inter alia, national security, security and war, biometrics, gated-ness, and environmental and bio-security threats.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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