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121 - 130 of 450 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 127A: Cities and the Future: Utopias, Dystopias, and Other Urbanisms to Come

What sort of futures are being imagined for the cities of the twenty-first century? An interdisciplinary seminar, this course will critically analyze how the future of cities, and the cities of the future, are being thought about and acted upon in the present. It is designed for graduate students and advanced undergraduates with experience in the social sciences and humanities and who also have a keen interest in urban studies. Its primary objective is to develop sophisticated ways of thinking about the future of cities, since doing so has real significance for the kind of city we want to, and eventually will, ourselves inhabit.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 127C: Anthropology of Sport and the Body

This course will use the work of anthropology and critical studies to analyze modern sport and how it shapes the body. We will begin by looking at various ways in which theorists have proposed studying sport, and then use these theoretical frameworks to examine contemporary sport, from individual practice to global spectacle. We will look too at how sport has historically been used as a technique of both control and resistance. We will read several anthropologists work on sport across the world. We will conclude the course with a sustained discussion of the Olympic Games, using the tools we have studied to think through this massive spectacle of global import. nThis course is ideally suited for anyone interested in how sport can be examined as a form of culture and social exchange and, more broadly, how theory can be used to break open contemporary culture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Kayne, S. (PI)

ANTHRO 128: Visual Studies

Drawing on anthropology, art history, cultural studies, and other fields, this course explores how and why one might want to think critically about the politics of visuality, social imagination, the politics of making and consuming images and things, iconophonia and iconophilia, the classification of people and things into ¿artists¿ and ¿art¿, and cultural production more generally.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Malkki, L. (PI)

ANTHRO 128A: The Boundaries of Humanity: Humans, Animals and Machines in the Age of Biotechnology

Advances in research and technology are blurring the boundaries between humans, animals, and machines, challenging conventional notions of human nature. Seminar explores the question of what it now means to be human and the personal, social, and ethical implications of our advancing technologies through the lens of various disciplines, including anthropology, cognitive psychology, neuroscience, genetics, evolutionary biology, biotechnology, and artificial intelligence. Includes guest speakers from fields and industries where important questions are being raised.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 129A: Photography and Anthropology (ARTHIST 159A)

This course focuses on anthropologists¿ engagement with photographs as part of their research and writing. In thinking about the relationship between text and image, we will consider how photographs have been used as documentation, data, evidence, art, illustration, and research tools. The course examines some ethical and aesthetic issues anthropologists have struggled with when producing, analyzing, writing about, investigating with and publishing photographs. Students in this course will take and display photographs, as well as discuss, analyze, read about and write about them.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Wetsel, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 130A: Interpreting Space and Place: An Introduction to Mapmaking

How mapmaking, geographical information systems (GIS), and spatial tools can be applied in social research. Qualitative and quantitative approaches in the use of geospatial information. Methodologies and case examples.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 130B: Introduction to GIS in Anthropology (ANTHRO 230B)

How GIS and spatial tools can be applied in social research. Case studies and student projects address questions of social and cultural relevance using real data sets, including the collection of geospatial data and building of spatial evidence. Analytical approaches and how they can shape a social and cultural interpretation of space and place.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 130D: Spatial Approaches to Social Science (ANTHRO 230D, POLISCI 241S, URBANST 124)

This multidisciplinary course combines different approaches to how GIS and spatial tools can be applied in social science research. We take a collaborative, project oriented approach to bring together technical expertise and substantive applications from several social science disciplines. The course aims to integrate tools, methods, and current debates in social science research and will enable students to engage in critical spatial research and a multidisciplinary dialogue around geographic space.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 130E: GIS, Archaeological Evaluation, Impact Assessment, and Site Management (ANTHRO 230E, ARCHLGY 130E)

The course explores archaeological GIS and the techniques adopted to acquire, evaluate and manage spatial data. The students will be provided both with theoretical and practical principles of GIS for archaeological use and site management.nnStudents will learn a complete GIS workflow, from data acquisition to decision making. They will use Venice, a multilayered site, as a test case. The course will examine practical evaluation processes in consideration of current and future development projects in the Venetian lagoon, listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Calaon, D. (PI)

ANTHRO 131: Genes and Identity (AFRICAAM 131, CSRE 131)

In recent decades genes have increasingly become endowed with the cultural power to explain many aspects of human life: physical traits, diseases, behaviors, ancestral histories, and identity. In this course we will explore a deepening societal intrigue with genetic accounts of personal identity and political meaning. Students will engage with varied interdisciplinary sources that range from legal cases to scientific articles, medical ethics guidelines, films, and ethnographies. We will explore several case studies where the use of DNA markers (either as proof of heritage or disease risk) has spawned cultural movements that are biosocial in nature. nnExamples include legal and political analyses of African ancestry testing as ¿evidence¿ in slavery reparations cases, debates on whether Black Freedman should be allowed into the Cherokee and Seminole Nations, considerations on whether people with genetic links to Jewish groups should have a right of return to Israel, close readings of The more »
In recent decades genes have increasingly become endowed with the cultural power to explain many aspects of human life: physical traits, diseases, behaviors, ancestral histories, and identity. In this course we will explore a deepening societal intrigue with genetic accounts of personal identity and political meaning. Students will engage with varied interdisciplinary sources that range from legal cases to scientific articles, medical ethics guidelines, films, and ethnographies. We will explore several case studies where the use of DNA markers (either as proof of heritage or disease risk) has spawned cultural movements that are biosocial in nature. nnExamples include legal and political analyses of African ancestry testing as ¿evidence¿ in slavery reparations cases, debates on whether Black Freedman should be allowed into the Cherokee and Seminole Nations, considerations on whether people with genetic links to Jewish groups should have a right of return to Israel, close readings of The U.S. Food and Drug Administration¿s crackdown on personal genomics testing companies (such as 23andMe), examinations of genetic identity politics in health disparities funding and orphan disease research, inquiries into new social movements organized around gene-based definitions of personhood, and civil liberties concerns about genetic ¿familial searching¿ in forensic databases that disproportionately target specific minority groups as criminal suspects. nnStudents will engage in a short observational ¿pilot¿ ethnographic project that allows them to further explore issues from the course for their final paper.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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