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11 - 20 of 450 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 13SI: Zombies: Anthropology of the American Undead

The zombie apocalypse, affectionately known as the ¿Zombiepocalypse.¿ In this combination class on zombie history, ethnography, biology, and culture, we will explore the origins of zombie legends (or truths?) and how the undead have been represented in American culture for the past 200 years. Classes will include lectures, film clip viewings, literary analysis, medical anthropology components, and disaster survival planning.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ANTHRO 14: Introduction to Anthropological Genetics

For upper division undergraduates. The extent and pattern of variation among human genomes, the origin of these patterns in human evolution, and the social and medical impact of recent discoveries. Topics include: the Human Genome Project; human origins; ancient DNA; genetic, behavioral, linguistic, cultural, and racial diversity; the role of disease in shaping genetic diversity; DNA forensics; genes and reproductive technology.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 15: Sex and Gender

Commonality and diversity of gender roles in crosscultural perspective. Cultural, ecological, and evolutionary explanations for such diversity. Theory of the evolution of sex and gender, changing views about men's and women's roles in human evolution, conditions under which gender roles vary in contemporary societies, and issues surrounding gender equality, power, and politics.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 16: Native Americans in the 21st Century: Encounters, Identity, and Sovereignty in Contemporary America (ANTHRO 116C, ARCHLGY 16, NATIVEAM 16)

What does it mean to be a Native American in the 21st century? Beyond traditional portrayals of military conquests, cultural collapse, and assimilation, the relationships between Native Americans and American society. Focus is on three themes leading to in-class moot court trials: colonial encounters and colonizing discourses; frontiers and boundaries; and sovereignty of self and nation. Topics include gender in native communities, American Indian law, readings by native authors, and Indians in film and popular culture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Wilcox, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 18: Peopling of the Globe: Changing Patterns of Land Use and Consumption Over the Last 50,000 Years (ARCHLGY 12, EARTHSYS 21, HUMBIO 182)

Fossil, genetic and archaeological evidence suggest that modern humans began to disperse out of Africa about 50,000 years ago. Subsequently, humans have colonized every major landmass on earth. This class introduces students to the data and issues regarding human dispersal, migration and colonization of continents and islands around the world. We explore problems related to the timing and cause of colonizing events, and investigate questions about changing patterns of land use, demography and consumption. Students are introduced to critical relationships between prehistoric population changes and our contemporary environmental crisis.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Ready, E. (PI)

ANTHRO 19Q: Hauntings, Visions, and Prophecy

Preference to sophomores. Why do people see ghosts? Why do people believe that stars foretell the future? When do people see demons and angels? Focus is on the conditions under which people experience themselves as having sensory evidence of supernatural phenomena and the role of training and expectation in the process. Intellectual exploration of what is known from the ethnographic, historical, and psychological record. Practical experimental projects involve attempting to induce positive supernatural experience. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 21N: The Anthropology of Globalization

Preference to freshmen. Anthropological approach to how cultural change, economic restructuring, and political mobilization are bound up together in the process of globalization.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 22: Archaeology of North America

Why and how people of N. America developed. Issues and processes that dominate or shape developments during particular periods considering the effects of history and interactions with physical and social environment. Topics include the peopling of the New World, explaining subsequent diversity in substance and settlement adaptations, the development of social complexity, and the impact of European contact.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 22N: Ethnographies of North America: An Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology

Preference to freshmen. Ethnographic look at human behavior, including cultural transmission, social organization, sex and gender, culture change, and related topics in N. America. Films.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 23N: Glimpses of Divinity

Preference to freshmen. How human beings search for and identify the presence of the divine in everyday human life. Sources include spiritual classics in the Christian, Jewish, and Hindu traditions including works by Augustine, Teresa of Avila, Jonathan Edwards, the Bhagavad Gita, the Zohar, and some ethnographies of non-literate traditions.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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