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81 - 90 of 427 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 112B: Advanced Study in Public Archaeology

This service-learning course is offered only to students who have completed Anthro 112a and wish to deepen their scholarship in public archaeology and heritage practice through continued study. Students enrolled in Anthro 112b complete readings, collections management study, public archaeology events, and community-based research oriented towards their specific interests.nPrerequisite: Completion of Anthro 112a AND instructor consent
Last offered: Spring 2013 | Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 113: Culture and Epigenetics: Towards A Non-Darwinian Synthesis (ANTHRO 213)

The course examines the impact of new research in epigenetics on our understanding of long-term cultural change. The course examines the various attempts that have been made over recent decades to find a synthesis between cultural and biological evolution. These approaches, often termed neo-Darwinian, include memes, dual inheritance theory, theories of cultural selection and transmission, niche construction theory and macro-evolutionary approaches. Research in all these areas will be examined, with particular reference to explanations for the origins of agriculture, but also including other transformations, and critiqued. New research in epigenetics offers an alternative non-Darwinian evolutionary perspective that avoids many of the problems and pitfalls in the neo-Darwinian approaches. Cultural evolution comes to be viewed as cumulative, directional and Lamarckian, since heritable epigenetic variation can underlie evolutionary change. Epigenetics opens the way for human cultural entanglements to become the drivers for evolutionary change, thus allowing the full range of social processes studied in the social and cultural sciences to take their place in the study and analysis of long-term change.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Hodder, I. (PI)

ANTHRO 113B: Religious Practices in Archaeological Cultures (ANTHRO 213B, ARCHLGY 113B)

According to Hawkes (1954), religion or ideology is the most difficult part of social life to access archaeologically. Luckily, not all scholars agree; according to Fogelin (2008) 'religion is not something people think about, but something people do¿. Thus, archaeology, an inherently multidisciplinary subject that studies material culture, is well suited to delve into religion and its underpinnings.nThis course will explore religious practices, as they can be defined and interpreted from archaeological contexts spanning the Paleolithic to historic periods. Definitions of religion differ from author to author but they mostly agree that religion is a fully integrated and thus integral part of human social life. Politics, economics, identity and social class influence religion, and religion influences how these forces play out in society. Thus, the course will also examine the significance of ritual and religion in a variety of social contexts.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ANTHRO 114: Prehistoric Stone Tools: Technology and Analysis (ANTHRO 214)

Archaeologists rely on an understanding of stone tools to trace much of what we know about prehistoric societies. How to make, illustrate, and analyze stone tools, revealing the method and theory intrinsic to these artifacts.
Last offered: Spring 2011 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

ANTHRO 114A: Introduction to South Asian Archaeolgy (ANTHRO 214A, ARCHLGY 114A)

This seminar will survey the archaeology of South Asia, beginning with animal and plant domestication in the early Holocene and ending with the late Medieval Period. Given its chronological breadth and spatial scope, the class will interrogate a variety of social and historical contexts that contribute to a broad range of anthropological research concerns¿including the intersections of authority, ritual, alterity and landscape¿and at the same time critically consider the epistemological bases for their analyses through archaeological remains.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Bauer, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 114B: Landscape Archaeology and Global Information Systematics (ANTHRO 214B)

This course is meant to lay groundwork for analysis of archaeological landscapes using the methods of GIS. Throughout, we consider the various understandings of landscape, from the biographical to the biological. The course explores the history of various typologies of landscape, incorporating the cultural, the topographical, the ecological, and the topological; reviews different types of landscape data and analysis, including aerial imagery, stratigraphic excavations, and specialized analyses; addresses how to integrate different sorts of data sets and carry out analytical assessment of interrelated "layers" as dynamic constituents of landscape; considers implications of landscape studies in modern policy and management. Students will create interpretive frameworks for a public audience as a component of the final project.
Last offered: Winter 2014

ANTHRO 115: The Social life of Human Bones (ANTHRO 215, ARCHLGY 115)

Skeletal remains serve a primary function of support and protection for the human body. However, beyond this, they have played a range of social roles once an individual is deceased. The processes associated with excarnation, interment, exhumation and reburial all speak to the place that the body, and its parts, play in our cultural as well as physical landscape.n This course builds on introductory courses in human skeletal anatomy by adding the social dynamics that govern the way humans treat other humans once they have died. It draws on anthropological, biological and archaeological research, with case studies spanning a broad chronological and spatial framework to provide students with an overview of social practice as it relates to the human body.
Last offered: Winter 2015

ANTHRO 115A: The Aegean in the Neolithic and Bronze Age (ANTHRO 215A, ARCHLGY 139, ARCHLGY 239)

This course provides a survey of Aegean prehistory (7th-2nd millennium BC), focusing on traditions that were picked up or renegotiated, instead of taking a standpoint that evaluates phenomena as steps leading up to a `state-like¿ `palatial¿ society. It will draw on the region¿s wealth of data, and will be set within a theoretically informed, problem-oriented framework, aiming to introduce students to current interpretations and debates, mainly through discussion of specific case-studies.
Last offered: Winter 2013

ANTHRO 115B: Peoples and Cultures of Ancient Mesoamerica (ANTHRO 215B)

This course engages with the world of ancient Mesoamerica, focusing on the Mixtec, Aztec, Maya, Zapotec, Chichimec, Olmec, and Teotihuacan peoples. We address how questions about the past are framed through ethnographic and ethnohistoric accounts of daily life, how diverse scientific methods and theoretical perspectives are used to address these questions, how interpretations of daily life in the ancient Mesoamerican world are formulated, and how these interpretations are marshaled in contemporary politics and policies. We explore different scales of Mesoamerican communities, and compare the diverse material culture and lifeways represented in Mesoamerica at different time periods. Students will create interpretive frameworks for a public audience as a component of the final project.
Last offered: Spring 2014

ANTHRO 116: Data Analysis for Quantitative Research (ANTHRO 216)

This course allows graduate and advanced undergraduate students in archaeology and anthropology to acquire practical skills in quantitative data analysis. Some familiarity with basic statistical methods is useful but not assumed; the structure of the course will be flexible enough to accommodate a range of student expertise and interests. Topics covered include: statistics and graphics in R; database design, resampling methods, diversity measures, contingency table analysis, and introductory methods in spatial analysis.
Last offered: Winter 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
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