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301 - 310 of 427 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 279A: Health, Illness, and Healing in South Asia (ANTHRO 179A)

This course has three related goals pertinent to medicine and healing in South Asia. The first is to understand the experiences of illness, and therapy in ordinary South Asian communities. How do social and economic inequality, religious commitments, available healing traditions, and community and family contexts shape the experience of illness and healing? The second goal is to think about South Asian medical systems using a broad historical perspective. How had biomedicine been used during the colonial period to manage the health of native populations? What is the legacy of this colonial history on current practices? What happens when South Asian medical traditions (such as Ayurveda) become global? Third, we will explore crucial health problems in South Asia from the perspective of medical anthropology. Possible topics for the third portion of the course include: child birth and maternal health, sex-selection technologies, malnutrition, metabolic diseases, the selling of organs, medical tourism, tuberculosis, HIV, suicide, and schizophrenia.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 282: Medical Anthropology (ANTHRO 82, HUMBIO 176A)

Emphasis is on how health, illness, and healing are understood, experienced, and constructed in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics: biopower and body politics, gender and reproductive technologies, illness experiences, medical diversity and social suffering, and the interface between medicine and science.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kohrman, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 282A: Down and Out: Marginal Lives and Institutional Technologies (ANTHRO 182A)

This course examines the neglect and management of socially marginalized persons including the mentally ill, youth runaways, child wards of the state, drug addicts and prisoners. In this course, we will approach the concept of marginality by investigating the spaces and institutions of decay, neglect and rehabilitation to which unwanted and indigent individuals are relegated. Readings are focused on qualitative research conducted within institutions of health, welfare, and reform. There will be two comparative public mental health sections in this course: one focused on South Asia and the second on Africa. This course is relevant for students interested in medical anthropology, applied anthropology, public health policy, or clinical careers in medicine, psychology, or social work.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 283: Ecology, Evolution, and Human Health

Human ecology, human environments, adaptation and plasticity, and their relationship to health and well-being. Comparative context. Topics include human population history, subsistence ecology, demography, reproductive decision making, migration, infectious disease, risk management, and social inequalities. Particular attention will be paid to small-scale subsistence populations. Small-scale societies demonstrate an enormous range of variation in both environmental challenges faced and adaptations thereto. The process of human adaptation cannot be understood in the absence of a grounding in this range of challenge and adaptation.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 283B: Human Mobility and Adaptability (ANTHRO 183B)

Mobility, whether in the form of seasonal or permanent migration, is an ancient practice necessary for many subsistence strategies, including hunting-and-gathering and pastoralism. Many new forms of mobility have emerged and now it is nearly impossible to consider a patch of human society that is not engaged in or directly impacted by habitual, patterned geographic mobility. Today, almost everywhere in the world, people can get farther, faster; urbanization, environmental degradation, and civil unrest are driving groups of people who do not have a cultural tradition of nomadic migration to adopt a mobile lifestyle¿sometimes permanently, sometimes temporarily¿in search of new economic or resource opportunities. In this seminar course, we will explore modern patterns of human mobility and migration as adaptive strategies for predictably and unpredictably changing environments. Using a framework of biological and cultural adaptation, we will discuss the major types of current human mobility (e.g. nomadism, immigration, migrant labor, displacement) and how they influence and are influenced by social systems, resource access, and health.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hazel, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 285: Medical Anthropology of Contemporary Africa (ANTHRO 185)

In this course we will examine the place of Africa in global health discourses while reading in-depth histories and ethnographies of the varied causes and consequences of some of the most difficult problems facing African countries today. We will study the effects of colonialism and conflict on health, explore the military and humanitarian connections in the fight against HIV/AIDS, weigh the risks and benefits of population genetic studies on African populations, examine biomedical interventions on, and erasures of, local health problems, and query the role of violence, memory, insecurity, and power in daily life on the continent.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 286: Culture and Madness (ANTHRO 186)

'Madness' lends insight into the construction of the normal and abnormal; the boundaries of reason and unreason; the epistemological relation of mind and body, and the management of difference and disease. Taking an interdisciplinary perspective, this course explores the fundamental questions madness poses to subjectivity, culture and modernity.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 293B: Master's Thesis Writing Seminar

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 298B: Digital Methods in Archaeology (ANTHRO 98B, ARCHLGY 98B)

This is a course on digital technologies in archaeology used for documentation, visualization, and analysis of archaeological spaces and objects. Emphasizes hands-on approaches to image manipulation, virtual reality, GIS, CAD, and photogrammetry modeling methods.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 298C: Digital Methods in Anthropology (ANTHRO 98C)

The course provides an introduction to a broad range of digital tools and techniques for anthropological research. It is geared towards those interested in exploring such methodologies for their research and wanting to add hands-on experience with state-of-the-art digital tools to their skill set. Students will learn to work with some of the most common tools used to collect and manage digital data, and to perform various types of analysis and visualization.nUndergraduate students register for 5 Units, Graduate students can register for 5 or 3 units.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Engel, C. (PI)
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