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241 - 250 of 427 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 215A: The Aegean in the Neolithic and Bronze Age (ANTHRO 115A, ARCHLGY 139, ARCHLGY 239)

This course provides a survey of Aegean prehistory (7th-2nd millennium BC), focusing on traditions that were picked up or renegotiated, instead of taking a standpoint that evaluates phenomena as steps leading up to a `state-like¿ `palatial¿ society. It will draw on the region¿s wealth of data, and will be set within a theoretically informed, problem-oriented framework, aiming to introduce students to current interpretations and debates, mainly through discussion of specific case-studies.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 215B: Peoples and Cultures of Ancient Mesoamerica (ANTHRO 115B)

This course engages with the world of ancient Mesoamerica, focusing on the Mixtec, Aztec, Maya, Zapotec, Chichimec, Olmec, and Teotihuacan peoples. We address how questions about the past are framed through ethnographic and ethnohistoric accounts of daily life, how diverse scientific methods and theoretical perspectives are used to address these questions, how interpretations of daily life in the ancient Mesoamerican world are formulated, and how these interpretations are marshaled in contemporary politics and policies. We explore different scales of Mesoamerican communities, and compare the diverse material culture and lifeways represented in Mesoamerica at different time periods. Students will create interpretive frameworks for a public audience as a component of the final project.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 216: Data Analysis for Quantitative Research (ANTHRO 116)

This course allows graduate and advanced undergraduate students in archaeology and anthropology to acquire practical skills in quantitative data analysis. Some familiarity with basic statistical methods is useful but not assumed; the structure of the course will be flexible enough to accommodate a range of student expertise and interests. Topics covered include: statistics and graphics in R; database design, resampling methods, diversity measures, contingency table analysis, and introductory methods in spatial analysis.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 216B: Anthropology of the Environment (ANTHRO 116B)

This seminar interrogates the history of anthropology's approach to the environment, beginning with early functionalist, structuralist, and Marxist accounts of human-environment relationships. It builds towards more recent developments in the field, focusing on nonhuman and relational ontologies as well as current projects on the intersections of nature, capital, politics, and landscape histories. At the end of this class, students will be familiar with the intellectual histories of environmental anthropology and contemporary debates and tensions around questions of ethics, agency, environment, and historical causality.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Bauer, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 217: Thinking Through Animals (ANTHRO 117)

The human-animal relationship is dynamic, all encompassing and durable. Without exception, all socio-cultural groups have evidenced complex interactions with the animals around them, both domesticated and wild. However, the individual circumstances of these interactions are hugely complicated, and involve much more than direct human-animal contact, going far beyond this to incorporate social, ecological and spiritual contexts. This course delves into this complexity, covering the gamut of social roles played by animals, as well as the methods and approaches to studying these, both traditional and scientific. While the notion of `animals as social actors¿ is well acknowledged, their use as proxies for human autecology (the relationship between a species and its environment) is also increasingly recognised as a viable mechanism for understanding our cultural and economic past. The module presents an overview covering a broad timespan from the Pleistocene to the modern day. It will piece together the breadth of human-animal relationships using a wide geographic range of case studies.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 217B: Monuments and Landscapes: An Archaeological Perspective (ANTHRO 117B, ARCHLGY 117B)

The landscape is a result of the action and interaction of human and natural factors. Communities have altered their landscapes for a variety of reasons, including the subsistence practices; as a consequence of economic growth; to express a social ideology, and as a consequence of political and religious drivers. Accordingly, landscapes enable physical and provide psychological sustenance to people, and the human need to relate to our surroundings is part of the way in which identities are created and disputed. Within the humanities, landscape is being conceptualized as a process, a practice and as performance, and monuments within a given landscape have an equally important role, not to mention history. They are often the most durable and well-known evidence of the ancient civilizations, and should be observed jointly with the landscape. How did the landscape predefine the monument and how did the monument complement, emphasize or devalue the landscape? What philosophy channeled the construction of the monuments within the landscapes? Whether ephemeral or permanent, the human agency left traces in the landscape; thus, both monuments and landscapes are the key indicators for understanding the ideology of a particular culture. Archaeology, through its interdisciplinary nature, provides a unique perspective, as well as tools, for examining the formation processes of all man-made elements, within both natural and cultural landscapes. nnThe course will address the multifaceted issues of the ways that people have consciously and unconsciously shaped the land around them through time. It will look into diverse, geographically and periodically influenced concepts of a monument and landscape. The course will be divided into two parts, with the first one covering the theory and methodological approaches and the second part the conceptual characteristics, modifications and changeability in various archaeological and historical periods and cultural frameworks.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Caval, S. (PI)

ANTHRO 219: Zooarchaeology: An Introduction to Faunal Remains (ANTHRO 119, ARCHLGY 119)

As regularly noted, whether historic or pre-historic, animal bones are often the most commonly occurring artefacts on archaeological sites. As bioarchaeological samples, they offer the archaeologist an insight into food culture, provisioning, trade and the social aspects of human-animal interactions. The course will be taught through both practical and lecture sessions: the `hands-on¿ component is an essential complement to the lectures. The lectures will offer grounding in the main methodological approaches developed, as well as provide case-studies to illustrate where and how the methods have been applied. The practical session will walk students through the skeletal anatomy of a range of species. It will guide students on the identification of different parts of the animal, how to age / sex individuals, as well as recognize taphonomic indicators and what these mean to reconstructing post-depositional modifications.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 221: Language and Prehistory (ANTHRO 121)

Language classification and its implications for human prehistory. The role of linguistic data in analyzing prehistoric populations, cultures, contact, and migrations. Comparison of linguistic and biological classifications. Reconstruction, proto-vocabularies, and culture. Archaeological decipherment and the origins and evolution of writing. Archaeological and genetic evidence for human migrations. (DA-A; HEF II,III)
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Fox, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 222A: Race and Culture in Mexico and Central America (ANTHRO 122A)

This course addresses the role of racial ideologies in the historical configuration of multiple hierarchies of inequality that determine the place of everyone in society in Mexico and Central America. Based on readings from the humanities and social sciences, we will discuss the cultural and racial politics of authoritarianism and indigenous insurgency, emphasizing narratives of laziness and vagrancy that have been central to the discipline of labor that shapes local processes of regressive modernization and nation building. We will analyze the hegemony of dictatorship as political necessity, the relationship between local racisms and global Whiteness, and the emergence of new local and transnational contestations to the multiple hierarchies that determine the place of everyone in society.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 222C: Research in Maya Hieroglyphic Writing (ANTHRO 122C)

Workshop. Current issues in the decipherment and analysis of Maya hieroglyphic writing and literacy.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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