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101 - 110 of 427 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 121A: Hip Hop, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language (AFRICAAM 121X, AMSTUD 121X, CSRE 121X, EDUC 121, LINGUIST 155)

Focus is on issues of language, identity, and globalization, with a focus on Hip Hop cultures and the verbal virtuosity within the Hip Hop nation. Beginning with the U.S., a broad, comparative perspective in exploring youth identities and the politics of language in what is now a global Hip Hop movement. Readings draw from the interdisciplinary literature on Hip Hop cultures with a focus on sociolinguistics and youth culture.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 121B: Vital Infrastructures: The Foundations of Modern Life

Infrastructure describes the material grids that exist beneath society, economy and culture: the foundation upon which everyday life rests and depends. While meant to remain invisible, out of sight and out of mind, diverse infrastructures have become lightning rods for political protest and demands for justice, rights, and a good life. From anti-dam activism in India, to campaigns for clean drinking water in South Africa, to transportation networks in urban Bolivia, and to the energy networks of the United States, infrastructure reveals the connections and disconnections of the globalized world. Taking an anthropological perspective, this course asks: why has infrastructure taken on vital importance to the modern nation-state? What do infrastructural histories reveal about the vital political ideals like freedom, development, equality, and nature? When does infrastructure take on a life of its own, undermining even the best laid plans? What happens when infrastructures fail? Through multi-disciplinary readings and exploratory assignments, this course challenges students see the world beneath their feet in new ways and to trace the material connections that define and sustain modern life itself.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 122A: Race and Culture in Mexico and Central America (ANTHRO 222A)

This course addresses the role of racial ideologies in the historical configuration of multiple hierarchies of inequality that determine the place of everyone in society in Mexico and Central America. Based on readings from the humanities and social sciences, we will discuss the cultural and racial politics of authoritarianism and indigenous insurgency, emphasizing narratives of laziness and vagrancy that have been central to the discipline of labor that shapes local processes of regressive modernization and nation building. We will analyze the hegemony of dictatorship as political necessity, the relationship between local racisms and global Whiteness, and the emergence of new local and transnational contestations to the multiple hierarchies that determine the place of everyone in society.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 122C: Research in Maya Hieroglyphic Writing (ANTHRO 222C)

Workshop. Current issues in the decipherment and analysis of Maya hieroglyphic writing and literacy.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 123: Readings in Linguistic Anthropology (ANTHRO 223)

One or two major related works on language in its cultural context. Works for 2007-08 involve attempts to correlate linguistic and non-linguistic data for analysis of prehistoric human contact and migrations. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 124: Maya Mythology and the Popol Vuh

The mythology and folklore of the ancient Maya, emphasizing the relationship between the 16th-century Quiché Maya mythological epic Popol Vuh (Book of the Council) and classic lowland Maya art, architecture, religion, and politics. General Mesoamerican mythology. Anthropological and other theories of mythology. Class participates in the creation of a web project on the Popol Vuh.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 124N: Maya Mythology and the Popol Vuh

Shortly after the Spanish conquest of Highland Guatemala, an anonymous Quiché Mayan noble translated a sacred text of his people, Popol Vuh (¿Council Book¿), and committed the Mayan to Spanish letters. His book, with its account of creations and destructions of the world by the gods, the descent of the Hero Twins into the Underworld and their ball games with its lords, and a history of the ruling clan of the Quiché state, is a grand apology for the values and world of the Quiché Maya, but it is no drab political treatise. It relates the daily life of the Quiché to their natural world (including the skies) and to the underworld journey that they expected in death, and is a compilation crafted to instruct and entertain at several levels of interpretation, from those of sophisticated scholars to children.n In the 1970¿s, we began to realize that many of the ceramic vessels unearthed from the tombs of the Classic Lowland Maya, originally intended to accompany their owners on their perilous journey through the underworld, actually illustrate scenes described in Popol Vuh. More recently, it has been possible to relate the mythology to texts newly deciphered from Mayan inscriptions as well as vases. The Popol Vuh has thus been shown to be a survival of a much older and more widespread culture. Like most survivals, though, it had been re-crafted in the image of the contemporary Quiché culture. When are mythological similarities sufficient to imply relatedness of the stories through common descent? How can mythical similarities imply universals of mind and culture? How have myths been used as state political instruments?n This is an exciting combination of archaeology, linguistics, cultural anthropology, art, and literature. Students will analyze the text critically, examine Mayan art, and help develop a web site. No prerequisites.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 125: Language and the Environment (ANTHRO 225)

Lecture course on vocabulary and grammar as keys to peoples¿ understanding and use of the environment. Ethnobotany, ethnobiology, and ethnosemantics in the analysis of the language of place, plants and animals, the earth, the body, and disease. Terminological gaps and gluts and what they imply. Language as a strategic resource in environmental management. Language contact and conflict in the modern global environment, with particular attention to the vocabularies of capitalism and property. Language extinction and its environmental implications. Anthropology concentration: CS, EE. No prerequisites.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Fox, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 125A: International Criminal Courts and the Question of Global Justice

What are the cultural, legal and political implications of the global extrapolation of our understanding of the rule of law, in general, and criminal law, in particular? This course will look at the theory and practice of the new international criminal courts, the criminalization and individualization (or humanization) of international law, and the broader system of cosmopolitan order that it presupposes, with special reference to how it differs from earlier projects for international order (international law, war crimes, human rights, and the UN system). Case studies will follow the historical development of the key institutions, individuals and legal precedents that have been determinative for the new international criminal jurisdiction, including Nuremberg and Tokyo, the ad hoc (Yugoslavia, Rwanda) and hybrid tribunals (Liberia, Sierra Leone, Lebanon, Cambodia) and now the International Criminal Court (DRC, northern Uganda, Sudan, Libya and Kenya).nn
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 125S: International Criminal Courts and the Question of Global Justice

What are the cultural, legal and political implications of the globalization of our understanding of the rule of law, in general, and criminal law, in particular? This course will look at the theory and practice of the new international criminal courts, the criminalization and individualization (or humanization) of international law, and the broader system of cosmopolitan order that it presupposes, with special reference to how it differs from earlier projects for international order (international law, war crimes, human rights, and the UN system). Case studies will follow the historical development of the key institutions, individuals and legal precedents that have been determinative for the new international criminal jurisdiction, including Nuremberg and Tokyo, the ad hoc (Yugoslavia, Rwanda) and hybrid tribunals (Liberia, Sierra Leone, Lebanon Cambodia) and now the International Criminal Court (DRC, northern Uganda, Sudan, Libya and Kenya).
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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