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61 - 70 of 390 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 141B: The Anthropology of Bits and Bytes: Digital Media in the Developing World

Recent historical developments, including the widespread adoption of the mobile phone across Africa and Southeast Asia, the ¿Arab Spring,¿ and the rise of technology sectors in cities such as Nairobi, Bangalore, and Accra, have turned digital technology in the ¿global South¿ into a topic of growing popular interest and increasing scholarly concern. This course attempts to make sense of these developments by interrogating diverse theoretical approaches to digital technology and assessing what these approaches reveal and obscure in specific cases of technology adoption in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Students will be introduced to an overview of scholarly approaches to digital technology from anthropology, science and technology studies (STS), critical theory, geography, and communications studies. We will analyze the relative utility of these explanations through case studies of specific instances of technological production and/or use. These case studies will be drawn from both secondary texts and primary materials such as social media, digital maps, videos, blogs, and news reports. At the same time, we will examine how digital discourses and practices both draw upon and inform broader issues of context-specific political and cultural importance. Major topics to be discussed include ¿development¿ and the State, civil society and the ¿public sphere,¿ youth culture, gender politics, mobility, and globalization. Students will come away from the course with a strong understanding of the major issues at stake in the increasing digitalization of the ¿global South,¿ and the socio-cultural, political, and technical debates that frame them
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Poggiali, L. (PI)

ANTHRO 143: Title Social Change in Contemporary China: Modernity and the Middle Kingdom (ANTHRO 243)

Over the last twenty years, residents of the People¿s Republic of China have experienced dramatic changes in nearly every facet of life. This undergraduate seminar introduces students to contemporary China through an examination of various types of social transformation. We will analyze how PRC residents of different backgrounds are confronting such processes as economic liberalization, migration, kinship transformation, sexual commodification, media proliferation, industrialization, and transnationalism? Priority is placed on reading, discussing and assessing research that uses qualitative methods and that situates political economy in dialogue with lived experience.
| UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 147: Nature, Culture, Heritage (ANTHRO 247)

Seminar. Shared histories of natural and cultural heritage and their subsequent trajectories into the present. How thought about archaeological sites and natural landscapes have undergone transformations due to factors including indigenous rights, green politics, and international tourism. The development of key ideas including conservation, wilderness, sustainability, indigenous knowledge, non-renewability and diversity. Case studies draw on cultural and natural sites from Africa, the Americas and Australia.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 147A: Folklore, Mythology, and Islam in Central Asia (REES 247A)

Central Asian cults, myths, and beliefs from ancient time to modernity. Life crisis rites, magic ceremonies, songs, tales, narratives, taboos associated with childbirth, marriage, folk medicine, and calendrical transitions. The nature and the place of the shaman in the region. Sources include music from the fieldwork of the instructor and the Kyrgyz epoch Manas. The cultural universe of Central Asian peoples as a symbol of their modern outlook.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

ANTHRO 148: Health, Politics, and Culture of Modern China (ANTHRO 248)

One of the most generative regions for medical anthropology inquiry in recent years has been Asia. This seminar is designed to introduce upper division undergraduates and graduate students to the methodological hurdles, representational challenges, and intellectual rewards of investigating the intersections of health, politics, and culture in contemporary China.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 149: South Asia: History, People, Politics (ANTHRO 249)

The South Asian subcontinent (comprising of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan and Sri Lanka) is one of the most diverse and densely populated regions in the world and increasingly prominent in new global political and cultural economies. South Asia has also provided the inspiration for cutting edge theories about the colonial state, postcolonial studies, democracy, popular culture, and religious conflict. The course will provide an overview of major historical events and social trends in contemporary South Asia and focus on themes such as gender, religion, caste, migration and movement, new technologies, the urban and rural, the state, and new forms of consumption among others.Thus, the course will give students historically and theoretically informed perspectives on contemporary South Asia, as well as how to apply insights learned to larger debates within the political and social sciences.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 151: Women, Fertility, and Work (ANTHRO 251, HUMBIO 148W)

How do choices relating to bearing, nursing, and raising children influence women's participation in the labor force? Cultural, demographic, and evolutionary explanations, using crosscultural case studies. Emphasis is on understanding fertility and work in light of the options available to women at particular times and places.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender

ANTHRO 152: Ritual, Politics, Power (SOC 156)

Our everyday lives are made up of multiple routines, some consciously staged and imagined and others unconscious and insidious. Anthropologists call these rituals. Rituals shape every aspect of our lives, creating our symbolic universes and governing the most minute of our practices. nnFor early anthropologists and for those interested in religious and symbolic life, rituals and rites were seen as both one of the most universal features of human existence, and, as that which enables us to reflect upon our human existence. A prominent example are that of the ¿rites de passage¿ found in every culture, from puberty initiation rites, weddings or funerals, which socially signal the change from one status to another. While initially for anthropologists, rituals marked the difference between the sacred and the profane, soon scholars began to see the ubiquity of ritual and the symbolic in shaping even the most mundane activity such as the structure of a meal and why one is not meant to eat dessert before the main course. The first half of the class examines these different debates surrounding the meaning and effects of rituals and rites. The second half of the class takes these debates to think about the question of power and politics. We return to the question of how our symbolic universes are staged and imagined by us through ritual forms such as the annual Presidential ¿pardoning the turkey¿ at Thanksgiving. The question of power however pushes us even further to ask why it is that we obey particular kinds of authority, consent to particular actions, and find ourselves doing things we haven¿t consciously decided to do. Many have argued that these kinds of political questions about how we respond and are shaped by power have something to do with our symbolic worlds and ritual, from the most obvious (the monarchy) to the most subtle (listening in a classroom). Throughout the course, these abstract questions will be grounded in cross-cultural examples and analysis.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 155: Research Methods in Ecological Anthropology (ANTHRO 255)

The course prepare students for the methodological and practical aspects of doing ecologically oriented, quantitative anthropological field research. The primary goal is to explore what it means to ask anthropological questions in a systematic way. We will focus on understanding what can constitute an interesting question, how to frame a question in way that facilitates investigation, and how to design methods to begin investigating a question. In turn, the course will provide a format to refine research projects in preparation for doing more extensive fieldwork.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
Instructors: Curran, L. (PI)

ANTHRO 156B: Environment, Nature and Race (CSRE 156J)

Environment, nature and race: Politics of belonging, exclusion, and embodiment. Scientific and popular understandings of race and ethnicity remain deeply entangled with ideas about "nature" and the "environment". This course will introduce students to some of the many ways that nature, environment, and race have been and remain intertwined, for better or for worse. What does it mean to claim race is "natural"? To what extent is race shaped by environment and vice versa? How are the politics of race linked to the politics of environmentalism? The class will begin with a brief treatment of current critical consensus on the biology of race and the cultural politics of race and nature, and move on to a theoretical discussion of how humans and "nature" interact. From there, the course moves into historical and ethnographic examples of the politics of race and the environment: the racialized and racializing character of particular environments; the ways that racial politics shape natural environments; and the politics of exclusion and belonging in environmental movements. Case studies will be both rural and urban and draw from anthropology, geography, history, and biology. The course will end by considering the recent resurgence of the race concept in biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Gardiner, M. (PI)
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