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31 - 40 of 390 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 102C: Indigenous Cultural Heritage: Protection, Practice, Repatriation (ARCHLGY 101, ARCHLGY 202, CSRE 102, NATIVEAM 102)

This interdisciplinary seminar explores challenges and avenues for furthering protection of the cultural heritage rights enshrined in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Using an innovative combination of online lectures by Stanford faculty and students, and recorded interviews with Indigenous leaders, artists, performers, scholars and museum professionals, the seminar will explore and problematize: historic and contemporary understandings of "Indigenous cultural heritage" and the impact of colonialism, urbanization and other forces on Indigenous identity and cultural heritage; current and potential domestic and international legal and non-legal frameworks for Indigenous cultural heritage protection and repatriation; past and present museum approaches to Indigenous peoples and their cultural material; and optimal methods of resolving repatriation disputes. While the seminar will cover primarily the situation of Indigenous peoples in North America, comparisons will be drawn with other regions of the globe. The on-campus component of the seminar will involve directed discussions of the online content, the online forum, assigned readings and short writing assignments. Students can choose between a final exam, paper or video project. Lunch is provided.
| UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Jessiman, S. (PI)

ANTHRO 106: Incas and their Ancestors: Peruvian Archaeology (ANTHRO 206A, ARCHLGY 102B)

The development of high civilizations in Andean S. America from hunter-gatherer origins to the powerful, expansive Inca empire. The contrasting ecologies of coast, sierra, and jungle areas of early Peruvian societies from 12,000 to 2,000 B.C.E. The domestication of indigenous plants which provided the economic foundation for monumental cities, ceramics, and textiles. Cultural evolution, and why and how major transformations occurred.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Rick, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 108E: Catalhoyuk and Neolithic Archaeology (ARCHLGY 108E)

Catalhoyuk as a case study to understand prehistoric social life during the Neolithic in Anatolia and the Near East. Developments in agriculture, animal domestication, material technology, trade, art, religion, skull cults, architecture, and burial practices. Literature specific to Catalhoyuk and other excavations throughout the Anatolian and Levantine regions to gain a perspective on diversity and variability throughout the Neolithic. The reflexive methodology used to excavate Catalhoyuk, and responsibilities of excavators to engage with larger global audiences of interested persons and stakeholders.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Hodder, I. (PI)

ANTHRO 111: Archaeology of Sex, Sexuality, and Gender (ANTHRO 211)

How archaeologists study sex, sexuality, and gender through the material remains left behind by past cultures and communities. Theoretical and methodological issues; case studies from prehistoric and historic archaeology.

ANTHRO 111B: Muwekma: Landscape Archaeology and the Narratives of California Natives (ARCHLGY 111B, NATIVEAM 111B)

This course explores the unique history of San Francisco Bay Area tribes with particular attention to Muwekma Ohlone- the descendent community associated with the landscape surrounding and including Stanford University. The story of Muwekma provides a window into the history of California Indians from prehistory to Spanish exploration and colonization, the role of Missionaries and the controversial legacy of Junipero Serra, Indigenous rebellions throughout California, citizenship and land title during the 19th century, the historical role of anthropology and archaeology in shaping policy and recognition of Muwekma, and the fight for acknowledgement of Muwekma as a federally recognized tribe. We will visit local sites associated with this history and participate in field surveys of the landscape of Muwekma.
Instructors: Wilcox, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 112: Public Archaeology: Market Street Chinatown Archaeology Project (ANTHRO 212, ASNAMST 112)

This internship-style course centers on the practice and theory of historical archaeology research and interpretation through a focused study of San Jose's historic Chinese communities. The course includes classroom lectures, seminar discussion, laboratory analysis of historic artifacts, and participation in public archaeology events. Course themes include immigration, urbanization, material culture, landscape, transnational identities, race and ethnicity, gender, cultural resource management, public history, and heritage politics. The course includes required lab sections, field trips, and public service. Transportation will be provided for off-site activities.
Last offered: Summer 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED

ANTHRO 113B: Religious Practices in Archaeological Cultures (ANTHRO 213B, ARCHLGY 113B)

According to Hawkes (1954), religion or ideology is the most difficult part of social life to access archaeologically. Luckily, not all scholars agree; according to Fogelin (2008) 'religion is not something people think about, but something people do¿. Thus, archaeology, an inherently multidisciplinary subject that studies material culture, is well suited to delve into religion and its underpinnings.nThis course will explore religious practices, as they can be defined and interpreted from archaeological contexts spanning the Paleolithic to historic periods. Definitions of religion differ from author to author but they mostly agree that religion is a fully integrated and thus integral part of human social life. Politics, economics, identity and social class influence religion, and religion influences how these forces play out in society. Thus, the course will also examine the significance of ritual and religion in a variety of social contexts.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Caval, S. (PI)

ANTHRO 114: Prehistoric Stone Tools: Technology and Analysis (ANTHRO 214)

Archaeologists rely on an understanding of stone tools to trace much of what we know about prehistoric societies. How to make, illustrate, and analyze stone tools, revealing the method and theory intrinsic to these artifacts.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

ANTHRO 115: The Social life of Human Bones (ANTHRO 215, ARCHLGY 115)

Skeletal remains serve a primary function of support and protection for the human body. However, beyond this, they have played a range of social roles once an individual is deceased. The processes associated with excarnation, interment, exhumation and reburial all speak to the place that the body, and its parts, play in our cultural as well as physical landscape.n This course builds on introductory courses in human skeletal anatomy by adding the social dynamics that govern the way humans treat other humans once they have died. It draws on anthropological, biological and archaeological research, with case studies spanning a broad chronological and spatial framework to provide students with an overview of social practice as it relates to the human body.
Instructors: Seetah, K. (PI)

ANTHRO 116: Data Analysis for Quantitative Research (ANTHRO 216)

This course allows graduate and advanced undergraduate students in archaeology and anthropology to acquire practical skills in quantitative data analysis. Some familiarity with basic statistical methods is useful but not assumed; the structure of the course will be flexible enough to accommodate a range of student expertise and interests. Topics covered include: statistics and graphics in R; database design, resampling methods, diversity measures, contingency table analysis, and introductory methods in spatial analysis.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
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