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231 - 240 of 390 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 150A: Minaret and Mahallah: Women and Islam in Central Asia (FEMGEN 150A, REES 250A)

Introduction to women's culture and art in Muslim countries of Central Asia. Women, bearers of family rites and folklore, are the key figures in transmission of traditional culture and guardians of folk Islam. Women helped to keep the continuity of Islamic education in Central Asia during the harsh times of Communist dominance. The whole wealth of women's oral tradition will be demonstrated and examined to the extent possible. The course will make broad use of audio-visual materials.

ANTHRO 151A: Contemporary Chinese Society Through Independent Documentary Film (ANTHRO 251A)

An overview of social issues in contemporary China as seen through its emerging independent documentary film movement. Topics covered include representations of history, political power and accountability in the reform era, human rights, urbanization, the environment, homelessness and inequality, sexualities, addiction, and the role of media in society. Each viewing is accompanied by readings in media theory or the anthropological/sociological study of contemporary China. Can be taken with or without research component. Films include English subtitles.

ANTHRO 152A: Urban Poverty and Inequality in Contemporary China

Experiences of poverty and inequality and their relationship to gender, space development, post-socialism, and globalization. How processes of class-making in China's cities are bound up with transformations in the country's sociopolitcal landscape.

ANTHRO 153A: Population and social trends in Japan (ANTHRO 253A)

Anthropological theories and concepts as applied to Japan. Postwar demographic trends. Delayed marriage.  Declining nuclear family.  Re-structuring of education and workplace. Problems for the seniors.  Foreign laborers shaking fundamentals of Japan.

ANTHRO 154: Anthropology of Drugs: Experience, Capitalism, Modernity (ANTHRO 254B, CSRE 154)

This course examines the significant role ¿drugs¿ play in shaping expressions of the self and social life; in the management populations, and in the production of markets and inequality. It engages these themes through cultural representations of drugs and drug use, analyses of scientific discourse, and social theory. Topics include: the social construction of the licit and illicit; the shifting boundaries of deviance, disease and pleasure; and the relationship between local markets and global wars.
Instructors: Garcia, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 160A: Tragedy of the Commons: Human Ecology of Communal Resources (ANTHRO 260A)

The ¿tragedy of the commons¿ is a classic social dilemma ¿ a situation in which individual interests conflict with collective ones ¿ and key to understanding past, present and future environmental degradation. This course surveys a variety of scientific perspectives on the essence of the tragedy: common property resources will ultimately be destroyed by overexploitation. Major themes include the effects of human population density and social organization on the health and management of commons, self-interest versus collective action, and potential solutions to commons problems. Modern and prehistoric case studies are examined from ecological and evolutionary perspectives.

ANTHRO 161A: Human Ecology: Adaptations to Climate and Climate Change (ANTHRO 261A)

Humans face essentially the same adaptive challenges as all organisms but are unique for having successfully adapted to virtually every environment on Earth. The resulting diversity of phenotypes and cultures¿past and present¿is key to understanding how interactions with environments shape the economic, social, and cultural lives of hunter-gatherers, pastoralists and agriculturalists. This course surveys the range of human adaptations from an ecological and evolutionary perspective to understand human adaptive capacity and vulnerability to climate change.

ANTHRO 163: Conservation and Evolutionary Ecology (ANTHRO 263)

Environmental degradation resulting from human behavior, and what can be done about it. Patterns of interaction between people and environments, and why they vary over time and space. Topics include adaptation and behavior, resource acquisition and utilization, conflicts of interest, collective action problems, conspicuous consumption, waste, land management, and public policy.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

ANTHRO 164: Natural Resource Extraction: Use and Development: Assessing Policies, Practices and Outcomes (ANTHRO 264)

This interdisciplinary course explores natural resource extraction from multiple conceptual perspectives. Logging and non-timber resource harvesting practices are examined through ecological dynamics of species and community life histories, natural and anthropogenic disturbance regimes and resilience and recovery to diverse perturbations through alternative stable states. Using a political ecology lens, we then examine historical and current policies and practices aimed to manage terrestrial resource use and extraction: maximum sustained yield, community-based forest management, certification systems, payment for ecosystem services and Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD). Through problem sets and lab/field exercises, we employ quantitative ecological measurements and experiments coupled with quantitative and qualitative methods and analyses used to assess socio-economic drivers and ecological impacts. Diverse benefits/costs imparted throughout the supply chain - from extraction to consumer ¿ are explored across temporal and spatial scales with local to global agents. No Prerequisites: course or foundation in Ecology, Community Ecology, and/or Ecosystem Ecology strongly suggested.

ANTHRO 164A: Anthropology of Ecotourism

Ecotourism has been touted as a win-win scenario for both biodiversity conservation and the well-being of local residents. In practice, these lofty ideals of ecotourism have proven difficult to implement. The rapid development of ecotourism over the last two decades. Focus is on the scholarly literature relating to ecotourism from both supporting and critical perspectives.
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