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211 - 220 of 238 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 373: Things: An Archaeology of the Relationships Between Humans and Things

This course examines a variety of approaches that claim to explore the relationships between humans and things. Some of the approaches include Marx and material culture studies; Heidegger; cognitive and phenomenological; Actor Network Theory. But there is a need also to examine behavioral and ecological and Darwinian approaches. Many of these approaches do not adequately deal with the physicality of things as objects and there is a need to seek a way to incorporate such aspects of things into social theory. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

ANTHRO 374: Archaeology of Colonialism/Postcolonialisms

Advanced graduate seminar focused on the archaeology of colonial and postcolonial contexts, both prehistoric and historic. Emphasis on intersections between archaeological research and and subaltern, postcolonial, and transnational feminist/queer theory. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

ANTHRO 376: Archaeology: The Emergence of a Discipline

This course explores the key thinkers and practitioners who have founded the discipline of archaeology. Reaching back into the nineteenth century, the course examines in depth the key figures, their preoccupations and projects that shaped the way that archaeology grew through the 20th and into the 21st century. Global in scope, the emphasis will be on field projects and practical problems that stimulated the intellectual development of archaeology as an independent discipline closely tied to geology, history, anthropology, and the natural sciences. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Last offered: Winter 2018

ANTHRO 378: Dynamics of Coupled Human-Natural Systems

This is a graduate research seminar on the interdisciplinary approach to the study of the dynamics of what is known as "coupled human-natural systems." We will take a critical perspective on such systems, asking to what extent the idea of coupling of discrete subsystems is intellectually profitable and what defines a "human" vs. a "natural" system? We will explore concepts such as coupling, nonlinearity, threshold behavior, feedback, complexity, resilience, and catastrophes. Case studies will be drawn from the literature on human ecology, population dynamics, disease ecology, and social dynamics. Emphasis will be on developing a working knowledge of mathematical and computational models of coupled systems embedded within a rigorous empirical framework of biosocial data collection.

ANTHRO 378A: History of Vaccines

This graduate seminar will examine the history of vaccine development focusing on technical, political, zoonotic, and ethical issues. Readings will be drawn from history, anthropology, literature, and biology. Prerequisite: consent of instructor
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: Jain, S. (PI)

ANTHRO 378B: Culture, Mind and Emotion : Anthropological and Psychological Approaches

How does culture shape the experience of thinking and feeling, the way humans relate to the world and to others? This graduate level course, taught by a psychologist who studies emotion (Jeanne Tsai) and an anthropologist who studies mind (Tanya Marie Luhrmann), explores the way that living in social worlds deeply shapes what seem to be basic processes. We explore what we know about the cultural variations in emotional experience, and about the effect of different representations of minds. We also what can be learned about the way culture shapes experience through different methods.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 5 units total)

ANTHRO 379: Empathy Lab

This lab-based class examines the ways in which various disciplines and art forms conceive of, and tell stories about, the experiences and stories of others. With permission of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

ANTHRO 381: Archaeology of Violence

This advanced graduate seminar reflects on archaeological research on violence in relation to readings in philosophy, political anthropology, cultural studies, and gender and ethnic studies. While some forensic approaches are discussed, the emphasis is more on structural and collective violence and the role of violence in the formation of the archaeological record.
Last offered: Winter 2018

ANTHRO 382J: Disasters in Middle Eastern History (HISTORY 382J)

( History 282J is an undergraduate course offered for 5 units; History 382J is a graduate course offered for 4-5 units.) This course explores the history of disasters in the Middle East from the early modern period to the mid-20th-century. We will trace the evolving meanings of disasters and misfortunes by focusing on critical moments -- plagues, fires, earthquakes, wars -- to examine how people have responded to these events, labeled them, and devised strategies to live with or forget them. The course readings follow the evolution of policies and norms together with the articulation of new forms of knowledge and expertise in the wake of catastrophe. Additionally, particular attention will be paid to how modern conceptions of disaster relate to older understandings of apocalypse, as well as to various strands of "disaster reformism," when rethinking tragedy and time helped assert radical agendas for reforming political, economic, social, communal, racial, and gender relations while remodeling social science and intellectual life. The course focuses on various trajectories of disaster thinking in Arabic, Turkish, Greek, Armenian, and Hebrew.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Zakar, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 385: Captivity

The premise for this course is that anthropology, as well as other domains of social inquiry, have unacknowledged and unredeemed debts to captivity as structure, experience, and event, from the penal colony to the slave plantation. This course is an attempt to begin to think about those debts through readings in anthropology, history, and philosophy. By instructor consent.
Last offered: Autumn 2018
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