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21 - 30 of 35 results for: AFRICAST

AFRICAST 211: Education for All? The Global and Local in Public Policy Making in Africa (AFRICAST 111)

Policy making in Africa and the intersection of policy processes and their political and economic dimensions. The failure to implement agreements by international institutions, national governments, and nongovernmental organizations to promote education. Case studies of crowded and poorly equipped schools, overburdened and underprepared teachers, and underfunded education systems.
Terms: alternate years, given next year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAST 212: AIDS, Literacy, and Land: Foreign Aid and Development in Africa (AFRICAAM 111, AFRICAST 112)

Is foreign aid a solution? or a problem? Should there be more aid, less aid, or none at all? How do foreign aid and local initiatives intersect? A clinic in Uganda that addresses AIDS as a family and community problem. Multiple strategies in Tanzania to increase girls' schooling. These are imaginative and innovative approaches to pressing and contested policy challenges. We will examine several contentious issues in contemporary Africa, exploring their roots and the intense conflicts they engender, with special attention to foreign aid and the aid relationship. As African communities and countries work to shape their future, what are the foreign roles and what are their consequences?
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Samoff, J. (PI)

AFRICAST 219: Novel Perspectives on South Africa (AFRICAAM 119, AFRICAAM 219, AFRICAST 119, CSRE 119)

21st-century South Africa continues its literary effervescence. In this class we¿ll sample some recent novels and related writings to tease out the issues shaping the country (and to some degree the continent) at present. Is `South African literature¿ a meaningful category today? What are the most significant features we can identify in new writings and how do they relate to contemporary social dynamics? The course will appeal to anyone interested in present-day Cape Town or Johannesburg, including students who have spent a term in BOSP-Cape Town or plan to do so in future. Both undergraduate and graduate students are welcome. 2-3 units. Course may be repeated for credit.n nAll students will write short analyses from the prescribed texts. Students taking the course for three units will write an extended essay on a topic agreed with the instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Parker, G. (PI)

AFRICAST 220E: Renaissance Africa (COMPLIT 220, ILAC 220E, ILAC 320E)

Literature and Portuguese expansion into Africa during the sixteenth century. Emphasis on forms of exchange between Portuguese and Africans in Morocco, Angola/Congo, South Africa, the Swahili Coast, and Ethiopia. Readings in Portuguese and English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAST 224: Memory and Heritage In South Africa Syllabus

The focus of this course is to provide a forum in which students examine the role of memory and heritage in South Africa. The course will include visiting speakers, discussion and other activities. The complex relationship between memory and heritage in South Africa will provide the basis for a series of broad conversations about citizenship, national reconciliation, memorialization, justice, modernity and heritage ethics.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAST 229: Literature and Global Health (AFRICAAM 229, COMPLIT 229, CSRE 129B, FRENCH 229, HUMBIO 175L, MED 234)

This course examines the ways writers in literature and medicine have used the narrative form to explore the ethics of care in what has been called the developing world. We will begin with a call made by the editor-in-chief of The Lancet for a literature of global health, namely fiction modeled on the social reform novels of the nineteenth century, understood to have helped readers develop a conscience for public health as the field emerged as a modern medical specialty. We will then spend the quarter understanding how colonial, postcolonial, and world literatures have answered and complicated this call. Readings will include prose fiction by Albert Camus, Joseph Conrad, Tsitsi Dangaremgba, Amitav Ghosh, Susan Sontag as well as physician memoirs featuring Frantz Fanon, Albert Schweitzer, Abraham Verghese, Paul Farmer. And each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical, and policy writings that deeply inform the field of global health.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAST 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

AFRICAST 238: Conflict and Reconciliation in Africa: International Intervention (AFRICAST 138, ANTHRO 138A, ANTHRO 238A)

This course will explore recent debates on the causes and structural terms of large-scale violence in Africa in the context of key contemporary models for reconciliation and transitional justice. Discussions will emphasize the broader international legal and political order each presupposes, and specifically whether their underlying reconstitution of rights and subjectivities are compatible with cultural, political or legal diversity. A historical assessment of the predominating Nuremberg paradigm of transitional justice¿structured around international military intervention and criminal trials based on international criminal courts¿will be contrasted with other regional models that engage with the challenges of the political reconciliation of formerly divided political communities. The necessity of understanding the specificities of both global and local historical and structural contexts will be examined with respect to various proposals for how to balance of balance concerns for both justice and peace. Readings will cover case studies from South Africa, Rwanda, DRC, northern Uganda, Sudan (including Darfur and South Sudan), Libya, Mali, and CAR.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAST 239: The Politics of Development: Social Service Delivery in the Developing World (IPS 239)

In this course we will examine variation in service delivery across the developing world, with an eye to identifying key factors in success or failure, and to understanding how the interests of individuals, governments, donors, and non-state actors shape the outcomes we observe in the world. The course will include a practicum component, where students will work directly with development practitioners in developing countries to problem-solve and to write case studies. Much of the course material will be drawn from sub-Saharan Africa, but we will also cover material from Latin America, South Asia, and Southeast Asia.
Terms: offered once only | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AFRICAST 242: Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs Advancing Democracy, Development and Justice (AFRICAST 142, INTNLREL 142)

This seminar is part of a broader program on Social Entrepreneurship at CDDRL in partnership with the Haas Center for Public Service. It will use practice to better inform theory. Working with three visiting social entrepreneurs from developing and developed country contexts students will use case studies of successful and failed social change strategies to explore relationships between social entrepreneurship, gender, democracy, development and justice. It interrogates current definitions of democracy and development and explores how they can become more inclusive of marginalized populations. This is a service learning class in which students will learn by working on projects that support the social entrepreneurs' efforts to promote social change. Students should register for either 3 OR 5 units only. Students enrolled in the full 5 units will have a service-learning component along with the course. Students enrolled for 3 units will not complete the service-learning component. Limited enrollment. Attendance at the first class is mandatory in order to participate in service learning.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kelly, K. (PI)
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