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AFRICAAM 209: On the Run: Fugitivity in the Early Black Atlantic

Fugitivity is being taken up more and more as a conceptual framework for thinking about possibilities for Black social life despite pervasive anti-Blackness, capture, confinement, exclusion, arrest, alienation, and social death. The fugitive, a word stemming from the Latin root ¿fug,¿ ¿to flee,¿ provides a figure of thought for reflection on the strategies and expressions of Black resistance, creativity, perseverance, and sociability in an anti-Black world. Fugitivity describes both the quotidian and extraordinary ways Black people transgress the border between freedom and unfreedom. It means creating, through the transgression of defiant movement, alternative possibilities for life outside of domination and suffering.n nGrounded in this context, this course examines the histories of enslaved flight, truancy, everyday refusal, and marronage in slaveholding Latin America, the Caribbean, and the United States. Maroons and their communities, or communities of those some would call ¿runawa more »
Fugitivity is being taken up more and more as a conceptual framework for thinking about possibilities for Black social life despite pervasive anti-Blackness, capture, confinement, exclusion, arrest, alienation, and social death. The fugitive, a word stemming from the Latin root ¿fug,¿ ¿to flee,¿ provides a figure of thought for reflection on the strategies and expressions of Black resistance, creativity, perseverance, and sociability in an anti-Black world. Fugitivity describes both the quotidian and extraordinary ways Black people transgress the border between freedom and unfreedom. It means creating, through the transgression of defiant movement, alternative possibilities for life outside of domination and suffering.n nGrounded in this context, this course examines the histories of enslaved flight, truancy, everyday refusal, and marronage in slaveholding Latin America, the Caribbean, and the United States. Maroons and their communities, or communities of those some would call ¿runaway slaves,¿ were an ever-present feature of slaveholding societies throughout the Americas. Everywhere they existed, from Brazil to Jamaica, from Virginia to Suriname, or from Mexico to Haiti, they proved the indomitable spirit of African descendants and the great failures of white domination and the institution of slavery. Throughout the course, we will look closely at the demographic, economic, and geographic opportunities for enslaved mobility and resistance that shaped the formation of the Atlantic world. The central focus will be an analysis of the historical impact of Black fugitivity across the Americas from 1502 to 1865.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
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