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11 - 20 of 25 results for: AFRICAAM

AFRICAAM 102B: Art and Social Criticism (AMSTUD 102, ARTHIST 162B, CSRE 102A, FEMGEN 102)

Visual artists have long been in the forefront of social criticism in America. Since the 1960s, various visual strategies have helped emergent progressive political movements articulate and represent complex social issues. Which artists and particular art works/projects have become key anchors for discourses on racism, sexism, economic and social inequality, immigrant rights and climate change? We will learn about a spectrum of political art designed to raise social awareness, spark social change and rouse protest. The Art Workers Coalition's agit-prop opposing the Vietnam War and ACT-UP's emblematic signs and symbols during the AIDS/HIV crisis of the 1980s galvanized a generation into action. Works such as Judy Chicago's The Dinner Party (1979), Fred Wilson's Mining the Museum (1992), and Glenn Ligon's paintings appropriating fragments from African-American literature all raised awareness by excavating historical evidence of the long legacy resisting marginalization. For three decades more »
Visual artists have long been in the forefront of social criticism in America. Since the 1960s, various visual strategies have helped emergent progressive political movements articulate and represent complex social issues. Which artists and particular art works/projects have become key anchors for discourses on racism, sexism, economic and social inequality, immigrant rights and climate change? We will learn about a spectrum of political art designed to raise social awareness, spark social change and rouse protest. The Art Workers Coalition's agit-prop opposing the Vietnam War and ACT-UP's emblematic signs and symbols during the AIDS/HIV crisis of the 1980s galvanized a generation into action. Works such as Judy Chicago's The Dinner Party (1979), Fred Wilson's Mining the Museum (1992), and Glenn Ligon's paintings appropriating fragments from African-American literature all raised awareness by excavating historical evidence of the long legacy resisting marginalization. For three decades feminist artists Adrian Piper, Barbara Kruger and the Guerilla Girls have combined institutional critique and direct address into a provocative form of criticality. Recent art for social justice is reaching ever broadening publics by redrawing the role of artist and audience exemplified by the democratization of poster making and internet campaigns of Occupy and the Movement for Black Lives. We will also consider the collective aesthetic activisms in the Post-Occupy era including Global Ultra Luxury Faction, Climate Justice art projects, and the visual culture of Trump era mass protests. Why are each of these examples successful as influential and enduring markers of social criticism? What have these socially responsive practices contributed to our understanding of American history?
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hertz, B. (PI)

AFRICAAM 106: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (CSRE 103B, EDUC 103B, EDUC 337)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAAM 117: Maroon Freedom: Black Resistance, Autonomy, and Fugitivity in the U.S. South

Maroons and their communities, or communities of those some would call ¿runawaynslaves,¿ were an ever-present feature of slaveholding societies throughout the Americas. Everywhere they existed, they proved the indomitable spirit of African people and the inherent failure of the institution of slavery. This course examines the conditions and characteristics of marronage specific to the U.S. south ¿ a site that was far from impervious to this hemispheric tradition of enslaved resistance. We will look closely at the demographic, economic, and geographic opportunities for enslaved mobility and resistance that shaped marronage in U.S. contexts. Our analysis includes marronage as it occurred in the Spanish and French colonial territories of Louisiana and Florida. The central focus will be the historical impact of marronage on enslaved and enslaver communities in the south from 1700 to 1865. Moving across space and time, this course takes a chronological,nthematic, and interdisciplinary appro more »
Maroons and their communities, or communities of those some would call ¿runawaynslaves,¿ were an ever-present feature of slaveholding societies throughout the Americas. Everywhere they existed, they proved the indomitable spirit of African people and the inherent failure of the institution of slavery. This course examines the conditions and characteristics of marronage specific to the U.S. south ¿ a site that was far from impervious to this hemispheric tradition of enslaved resistance. We will look closely at the demographic, economic, and geographic opportunities for enslaved mobility and resistance that shaped marronage in U.S. contexts. Our analysis includes marronage as it occurred in the Spanish and French colonial territories of Louisiana and Florida. The central focus will be the historical impact of marronage on enslaved and enslaver communities in the south from 1700 to 1865. Moving across space and time, this course takes a chronological,nthematic, and interdisciplinary approach to investigating maroon survival, autonomy, gender, kinship, community, and the relationship between marronage and insurrection. We examine a wide range of evidence spanning periodicals, state mandates, archaeology, runaway slave advertisements, slave narratives, oral histories, and traveler¿s logs, in addition to secondary literature.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AFRICAAM 121N: How to Make a Racist (CSRE 21N, PSYCH 21N)

How does a child, born without beliefs or expectations about race, grow up to be racist? To address this complicated question, this seminar will introduce you to some of the psychological theories on the development of racial stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. Together, these theories highlight how cognitive, social, and motivational factors contribute to racist thinking. We will engage thoughtfully and critically with each topic through reflection and discussion. Occasionally, I will supplement the discussion and class activities with a brief lecture, in order to highlight the central issues, concepts, and relevant findings. We will share our own experiences, perspectives, and insights, and together, we will explore how racist thinking takes root. Come to class with an open mind, a willingness to be vulnerable, and a desire to learn from and with your peers. Students with diverse opinions and perspectives are encouraged to enroll.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Roberts, S. (PI)

AFRICAAM 124F: The Mothership Connection: Black Science Fiction Across Media (CSRE 124F)

As science fiction becomes the lingua franca of American popular culture and race takes center stage in our contemporary social and political discourses, the works of black SF creators offer a number of powerful conceptual tools for thinking about race, and particularly for exploring the experience and effects of the African diaspora. This course will consider how black authors, artists, musicians, and filmmakers have responded to or engaged the transmedia genre of SF, as well as the role that race plays in the history of science fiction. What is Afrofuturism, and is it distinct from black science fiction? How does black SF relate to other speculative genres and aesthetics (horror, fantasy, new age, psychedelia, etc.)? Is there something inherently science fictional about the Afro-diasporic experience? How do typical SF tropes - robots, spaceships, technology, the apocalypse, the posthuman - change when considered in the aftermath of the Miiddle Passage and chattel slavery?
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAAM 135A: Islam in America (AMSTUD 135X, CSRE 135, GLOBAL 137, RELIGST 135)

This course explores the history of Islam in North America with special emphasis on the experience of Muslims in the United States. Contrary to popularly held belief, Muslims have been critical participants in the construction of American identity from the 16th century onwards when Muslim slaves were forcibly brought to Colonial America. Our course will explore the diverse ways Muslims in America have imagined, practiced, and negotiated their religious identity. We will move chronologically, and we will focus upon three crucial themes: the convergence of constructions of racial, religious, and national identities in America; the ever-shifting terrain of notions of authority and authenticity amongst Muslims in America; and global resonances of the practices and ideas of American Muslims.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Morgan, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 147: History of South Africa (CSRE 174, HISTORY 147)

(Same as HISTORY 47. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 147.) Introduction, focusing particularly on the modern era. Topics include: precolonial African societies; European colonization; the impact of the mineral revolution; the evolution of African and Afrikaner nationalism; the rise and fall of the apartheid state; the politics of post-apartheid transformation; and the AIDS crisis.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Campbell, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 160J: Conjure Art 101: Performances of Ritual, Spirituality and Decolonial Black Feminist Magic (CSRE 160J, DANCE 160J)

Conjure Art is a movement and embodied practice course looking at the work and techniques of artists of color who utilize spirituality and ritual practices in their art making and performance work to evoke social change. In this course we will discuss the work of artists who bring spiritual ritual in their art making while addressing issues of spiritual accountability and cultural appropriation. Throughout the quarter we will welcome guest artists who make work along these lines, while exploring movement, writing, singing and visual art making. This class will culminate in a performance ritual co-created by students and instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Smith, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 195: Independent Study

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAAM 200X: Honors Thesis and Senior Thesis Seminar

Required for seniors. Weekly colloquia with AAAS Director and Associate Director to assist with refinement of research topic, advisor support, literature review, research, and thesis writing. Readings include foundational and cutting-edge scholarship in the interdisciplinary fields of African and African American studies and comparative race studies. Readings assist students situate their individual research interests and project within the larger. Students may also enroll in AFRICAAM 200Y in Winter and AFRICAAM 200Z in Spring for additional research units (up to 10 units total).
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Brown, N. (PI)
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