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11 - 20 of 62 results for: AAAS::core

AFRICAAM 75E: Black Cinema

How filmmakers represent historical and cultural issues in Black cinema.
Last offered: Autumn 2011 | Repeatable for credit

AFRICAAM 105: Introduction to African and African American Studies

Interdisciplinary. Central themes in African American culture and history related to race as a definitive American phenomenon. African survivals and interpretations of slavery in the New World, contrasting interpretations of the Black family, African American literature, and art. Possible readings: Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, Richard Wright, Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Malcolm X, Alice Walker, and Bell Hooks. Focus may vary each year.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED

AFRICAAM 116: Education, Race, and Inequality in African American History, 1880-1990 (AMSTUD 216, CSRE 216X, EDUC 216, HISTORY 255E)

Seminar. The relationship among race, power, inequality, and education from the 1880s to the 1990s. How schools have constructed race, the politics of school desegregation, and ties between education and the late 20th-century urban crisis.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul

AFRICAAM 123: Great Works of the African American Tradition

Foundational African and African American scholarly figures and their work from the 19th century to the present. Historical, political, and scholarly context. Dialogues distinctive to African American culture. May be repeated for credit.
| Repeatable for credit

AFRICAAM 147: History of South Africa (CSRE 174, HISTORY 147)

(Same as HISTORY 47. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 147.) Introduction, focusing particularly on the modern era. Topics include: precolonial African societies; European colonization; the impact of the mineral revolution; the evolution of African and Afrikaner nationalism; the rise and fall of the apartheid state; the politics of post-apartheid transformation; and the AIDS crisis.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Campbell, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 156: Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson (CSRE 156T, TAPS 156, TAPS 356)

This course purposefully and explicitly mixes theory and practice. Students will read and discuss the plays of August Wilson, the most celebrated and most produced contemporary American playwright, that comprise his 20th Century History Cycle. Class stages scenes from each of these plays, culminating in a final showcase of longer scenes from his work as a final project.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED

AFRICAAM 159: James Baldwin & Twentieth Century Literature (ENGLISH 159, FEMGEN 159)

Black, gay and gifted, Baldwin was hailed as a "spokesman for the race", although he personally, and controversially, eschewed titles and classifications of all kinds. This course examines his classic novels and essays as well his exciting work across many lesser-examined domains - poetry, music, theatre, sermon, photo-text, children's literature, public media, comedy and artistic collaboration. Placing his work in context with other writers of the 20C (Faulkner, Wright,Morrison) and capitalizing on a resurgence of interest in the writer (NYC just dedicated a year of celebration of Baldwin and there are 2 new journals dedicated to study of Baldwin), the course seeks to capture the power and influence of Baldwin's work during the Civil Rights era as well as his relevance in the "post-race" transnational 21st century, when his prescient questioning of the boundaries of race, sex, love, leadership and country assume new urgency.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

AFRICAAM 189: Black Life and Death in the Neoliberal Era

Professor Robin Kelley will teach this course. Of course, this is a history/genealogy of how we got to this place - precarity, mass incarceration, privatization and (re)dispossession of black lives, and the movements that erupted ¿ all since the early 1970s. It is as much an intellectual history as it is a political and cultural one since I will circle back to the roots of "neoliberal thinking¿ in 18th and 19th century liberalism, colonialism, imperialism, social Darwinism in the so-called ¿Gilded Age.¿ Will also touch on the rise of social democracy and its recasting of ¿liberal¿ as the welfare state, the ascendance of military Keynesianism, and Hayek¿s and Milton Freidman¿s Cold War resuscitation and revision of 19th century liberalism. Much of our reading and discussion will examine the global economic crisis of the 1970s, and the subsequent restructuring of the political economy, the state, and culture (not limited to the U.S. but looking at the ¿Third World¿ or Global South¿issues more »
Professor Robin Kelley will teach this course. Of course, this is a history/genealogy of how we got to this place - precarity, mass incarceration, privatization and (re)dispossession of black lives, and the movements that erupted ¿ all since the early 1970s. It is as much an intellectual history as it is a political and cultural one since I will circle back to the roots of "neoliberal thinking¿ in 18th and 19th century liberalism, colonialism, imperialism, social Darwinism in the so-called ¿Gilded Age.¿ Will also touch on the rise of social democracy and its recasting of ¿liberal¿ as the welfare state, the ascendance of military Keynesianism, and Hayek¿s and Milton Freidman¿s Cold War resuscitation and revision of 19th century liberalism. Much of our reading and discussion will examine the global economic crisis of the 1970s, and the subsequent restructuring of the political economy, the state, and culture (not limited to the U.S. but looking at the ¿Third World¿ or Global South¿issues of debt, austerity and structural adjustment policies, environmental destruction, and military intervention. But the main focus is on how neoliberalism assaulted most black lives while enriching a handful of others; how is spawned a level of state violence that sometimes feels unprecedented and against which many movements emerged.
Last offered: Spring 2016

AFRICAAM 195: Independent Study

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5

AFRICAAM 199: Honors Project

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit
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